Fake-fictions – Ghosts Of Abu Ghraib http://ghostsofabughraib.org/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 16:09:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-120x120.jpg Fake-fictions – Ghosts Of Abu Ghraib http://ghostsofabughraib.org/ 32 32 FALSE HEADLINE: Cameroon dam failed to kill 300 Nigerians | by PesaCheck | Sep 2022 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/false-headline-cameroon-dam-failed-to-kill-300-nigerians-by-pesacheck-sep-2022/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 16:09:29 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/false-headline-cameroon-dam-failed-to-kill-300-nigerians-by-pesacheck-sep-2022/ 300 Nigerians died from the 2022 floods, not from water released from the Lagdo Dam in September. A press article to claim that 300 Nigerians died after excess water spilled from the Lagdo Dam in Cameroon has a FALSE TITLE. The headline reads: ‘Lagdo dam in Cameroon kills over 300 Nigerians’. The National Emergency Management […]]]>

300 Nigerians died from the 2022 floods, not from water released from the Lagdo Dam in September.

A press article to claim that 300 Nigerians died after excess water spilled from the Lagdo Dam in Cameroon has a FALSE TITLE.

The headline reads: ‘Lagdo dam in Cameroon kills over 300 Nigerians’.

The National Emergency Management Agency of Nigeria (NEMA) warned that the release of excess water from the Lagdo dam on September 13, 2022 could worsen the situation in areas already flooded due to heavy rains.

At the time, NEMA said 300 were dead, 500 injured and more than 100,000 displaced due to flood until September 2022.

On September 19, 2022, Mustapha Ahmed, chief executive of the emergency management agency, called on affected states to “match this early warning with rapid action.”

PesaCheck has reviewed a news report that the release of water from the Lagdo Dam resulted in the death of 300 people in Nigeria and found it had a FALSE TITLE.

This post is part of an ongoing series of PesaCheck fact checks examining content marked as potential misinformation on Facebook and other social media platforms.

By partnering with Facebook and similar social media platforms, third-party fact-checking organizations like PesaCheck help tell fact from fiction. We do this by giving audiences deeper insight and context into the posts they see in their social media feeds.

Have you spotted what you think is fake or false information on Facebook? Here’s how you can report. And, here is more information on The PesaCheck methodology to check for questionable content.

This fact check was written by climate change fact checker PesaCheck Christiaan van der Merwe and edited by the editor of PesaCheck Cedrick Irakoze and acting editor Francis Mwaniki.

The article has been approved for publication by the editor of PesaCheck Doreen Wainainah.

PesaCheck is the first public finance fact-checking initiative in East Africa. It was co-founded by Catherine Gicheru and Justin Arensteinand is incubated by the continent’s largest civic tech and data journalism accelerator: Code for Africa. It aims to help the public separate fact from fiction in public statements about the numbers that shape our world, with particular emphasis on public finance statements that shape government delivery of public services and development goals. (SDGs), such as health care, rural development and access to water/sanitation. PesaCheck also tests the accuracy of media reporting. To learn more about the project, visit pesacheck.org.

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PesaCheck is an initiative of Code for Africathrough his fund innovateAFRICAwith the support of Deutsche Welle Academyin partnership with a coalition of local African media and other civic watch organizations.



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Be Afraid (But Not Too Afraid): Graphic Horror Novel for Intermediate Readers https://ghostsofabughraib.org/be-afraid-but-not-too-afraid-graphic-horror-novel-for-intermediate-readers/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 23:44:50 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/be-afraid-but-not-too-afraid-graphic-horror-novel-for-intermediate-readers/ Graphic novels offer thrills and chills, and intermediate-level readers are spoiled for choice. Brigid Alverson reviews the format and recommends 13 titles that deftly blend scary and fun. Artwork by Stephen Gilpin As a child, Mark Fearing watched old horror movies with his family. Later, he thinks about how he would escape the various monsters. […]]]>

Graphic novels offer thrills and chills, and intermediate-level readers are spoiled for choice. Brigid Alverson reviews the format and recommends 13 titles that deftly blend scary and fun.

Artwork by Stephen Gilpin

As a child, Mark Fearing watched old horror movies with his family. Later, he thinks about how he would escape the various monsters. “Werewolves were the worst,” he says. “I could outrun Frankenstein’s monster. If you have a crucifix with Dracula, it will be fine. Damn, those werewolves! They can climb through a second story window!
As an adult, Fearing still ponders the best way to survive a monstrous encounter, but from a different perspective: he is the author of Welcome to Feralthe first of a planned two-volume series set in a haunted town.

Graphic novels deliver thrills and chills, and intermediate-level readers are spoiled for choice. Some mix humor with horror; others pack in action and suspense. Links abound, from one stranger things spinoffs to adaptations of classic horror titles such as Bunnicula and shows like “Goosebumps” and “The Bailey School Kids.” One thing they all have in common? Kids lead the action, whether they’re battling monsters or befriending ghouls.

Halloween provides an excuse to showcase these titles, but kids love horror year-round. “I usually have an endless reserve list for our horror graphic novels,” says Julie Shatterly, K-5 school librarian at WA Bess Elementary in Gastonia, North Carolina. Although the collection is small, demand is high, especially for readers in grades 2 to 5, she adds. “It doesn’t matter if they are struggling readers or proficient readers, they love the chilling mix of words and images.”

There is also a lesson hiding under the cobwebs. “Horror is an allegorical storytelling device,” says film producer and graphic novel editor Sandy King, who runs horror comics publisher Storm Kids. “Whether it is for children or adults, it allows us to process our fears in a safe way. We can face what bothers us or scares us and make sense of it.

Read: 16 Spooky Middle Grade Books for Young Horror Fans

“Kids like to be scared when they think they’re safe at the same time,” says RL Stine, creator of “Goosebumps” and the “Just Beyond” graphic novel series. That’s why his books always have a happy ending. “It can get pretty scary – they can have these crazy adventures – but they know it’s all going to work out eventually, and that’s really important.”

For Stine, surprise is the secret sauce of mean horror. “Most children’s literature is very linear,” he says. “You can predict where this is all going to go. But you can’t do that with ‘Goosebumps’. There are always two or three real bumps and real twists and turns that rock everything. And I think kids like it. I think they like to be teased.

Stine puts a lot of constraints on his mid-level stories. “Nobody ever dies,” he says. “No one is ever seriously hurt. No real-world issues. If I think a scene is getting too intense, I add something fun. You don’t really want to terrify the kids.

Artists also strive to achieve the right degree of terror. Ira Marcks remembers reducing the horror in a scene from his graphic novel shark summerr. The story is about a group of children on Martha’s Vineyard watching the movie Jaws being filmed, and one of the props is a severed fake head – a head that his editor originally thought was too realistic. “She’s like, ‘You’re drawing this in too much detail,'” Marcks explains. “”Draw it to be a little more cartoonish, leave out the rot around the mouth, make the blood a little darker. “”

Graphic novels allow creators to balance the dark parts of a story with comic book art, as Fearing does in Welcome to Feral. “My style allows me to do much scarier things than if I were drawing in a very realistic style,” he says. “I hope to walk the line where it’s scary and fun and readable and interesting and intriguing and all that, but not, you know, scary. I have stories that I could illustrate that are really, horribly scary, but it is not what it is.

Sample pages from left:
Bunnicula: The Graphic Novel by James Howe, adapted by Andrew Donkin/illus. by Stephen Gilpin; Prunella and the Cursed Skull Ring by Matthew Loux;
Scare School (Just Beyond series) by RL Stine, ill. by miscellaneous; Welcome to Feral by Mark Fearing; Have You Seen The Darkness (Black Sand Beach Series) by Richard Fairgray.

Ages and stages

At Storm Kids, King constructs a carefully curated series of horror stories for different age groups. “With the smaller children’s books, I use artists who can draw in a Disney-esque style that’s accessible and kid-friendly,” she says. “As the books go up in ages, I get a little bolder in style and colors.”

“I want the younger kids to have fun and join in the fun,” she says. “I want them to enjoy the BOO! scare or the pumpkins and the bats and the ghosts. As they get older, I want them to feel good when they get off the rollercoaster safe and sound. When they get to YA , I would like them to learn to love the power of suspense and release, the dynamics of good storytelling.

Read: 15 Frightful Favorites: A Fifth Grader’s Horror Booklist

“It’s not about chopping off heads and having nightmares,” King adds. “This is the AHA!” moments.”

And there are all kinds of readers. “It’s amazing how something doesn’t faze one child but scares another,” observes Shatterly. Like King, she focuses on different types of stories for different ages. For K-2 students, she chooses uplifting folk tales with a spooky twist, like “Little Red Riding Hood.” In third grade, she presents stories in which things may not be what they seem, such as in “The Bailey School Kids”. For older readers, Shatterly explores parallels between horror and history with classic folk stories from North Carolina and the Appalachian region.

When kids choose their own horror stories, Shatterly says, many strive to keep up with what their friends read. “I think they’re also exploring the boundaries and freedoms they’ve just gained as new, middle-level readers,” she says. “Intermediate readers independently explore what their horror tolerance is and where they can personally draw the line.” While many students at this age are heavily influenced by movies, TV and books marketed to teenagers, she says, “I told them they put aside the horror that was just too much for them. .

The hidden monster

“It’s not the monster behind the door that terrifies people,” says Jack Axworth, a character in Marcks’ graphic novel Spirit week. “It’s what they conjure up in their minds the moment before that door opens.” Loosely inspired by the film the brilliantSpirit Week centers on a group of kids who want to save an aging hotel and eventually remove a local curse.

“That thing you don’t see, like the shark in Jaws— that’s the trick” that puts the imagination in awe, adds Marcks.

Other works offer the fear factor, then have an emotional impact when appearances are deceiving and the scary creature turns out to be a friend, not a foe. In Prunella and the Cursed Skull Ring, a young girl discovers that the monsters her village is so afraid of are warmer and more tolerant creatures than the people in her community. In Terror Tales of Grimm’s Town: The Rise of the Creeper, a monster cries after being hit with a baseball bat; it turns out he’s an ally, not an enemy. And in The ghoul next doora ghoul living in a graveyard explains that his kind doesn’t choose his corpse-eating way of life, then befriends the human protagonist.

Scary graphic novels inspire readers to face their fears and think about how they would escape the werewolf, just as Fearing did – and they often tap into newly discovered reserves of bravery or skill.

“At every stage of our lives, books help us process the world around us,” King says. “Some people will always be afraid of the monster under the bed. Others will gain confidence having beaten this monster before, in all its disguises.

Brigid Alverson edits the blog “Good comics for children.”


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Lexia Learning Survey Shows Teacher Burnout Top Concern for Educators for 2022-23 School Year | app https://ghostsofabughraib.org/lexia-learning-survey-shows-teacher-burnout-top-concern-for-educators-for-2022-23-school-year-app/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 13:03:47 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/lexia-learning-survey-shows-teacher-burnout-top-concern-for-educators-for-2022-23-school-year-app/ BOSTON–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Sept. 27, 2022– A national survey conducted by Lexia Learninga Cambium Learning® Group company, found that the majority of educators (71%) are concerned about teacher burnout in the 2022-23 school year. × This page requires JavaScript. Javascript is required for you to play premium content. Please enable it in your browser settings. kAm%92E 4@?46C? […]]]>

BOSTON–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Sept. 27, 2022–

A national survey conducted by Lexia Learninga Cambium Learning® Group company, found that the majority of educators (71%) are concerned about teacher burnout in the 2022-23 school year.

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Copyright BusinessWire 2022.


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Political events now turn into a soap opera so quickly that we risk confusing fact with fiction | Marthe Gill https://ghostsofabughraib.org/political-events-now-turn-into-a-soap-opera-so-quickly-that-we-risk-confusing-fact-with-fiction-marthe-gill/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 13:04:00 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/political-events-now-turn-into-a-soap-opera-so-quickly-that-we-risk-confusing-fact-with-fiction-marthe-gill/ Oinston Churchill was not immortalized on British screens until five years after his death. The Profumo affair took a quarter of a century to take shape. But the speed at which politics is appropriated by showbusiness – with prosthetics obscuring the traditional difference between the two – is rather faster these days. Wednesday we will […]]]>

Oinston Churchill was not immortalized on British screens until five years after his death. The Profumo affair took a quarter of a century to take shape. But the speed at which politics is appropriated by showbusiness – with prosthetics obscuring the traditional difference between the two – is rather faster these days.

Wednesday we will have This Englanda drama spanning Boris Johnson’s tenure, with Kenneth Branagh in clumsy, pseudo-Churchilian mode and Ophelia Lovibond, with a bump and twice as much hair, as Carrie.

It seems rather fast – maybe too fast. It’s pure coincidence that the series didn’t air while Johnson is still Prime Minister. Lovibond told interviewers how odd it was to see her character on the front page as she showed up to film and spoke about her responsibility – as if on a jury – not to be swayed by speaking to people. bad people about it. Filming also wrapped too soon for director Michael Winterbottom to include the true ending to the story, which he has to kick himself over, and the series will even dwell on the Covid rampages, with dying patients and sobbing relatives. Too early?

Political dramas have been happening too soon for some time. While still in office, Tony Blair was immortalized to death (The agreementstarring Michael Sheen, one of Blair’s many docudramas, premiered just five years after he took office). Brexit: the uncivil war came out in 2019 when big decisions about the event were still looming and Dominic Cummings, the main character, was still going wild in Downing Street.

What result, if any, will this momentum have to turn news into drama? Unlike political balance in the media, for example, the effect that political fiction might have on the body politic is not taken particularly seriously. But fiction and television series are changing the way people view politics and politicians. It might even change the way we vote.

This is of course not a new observation. Shelley once wrote that poets are the “unacknowledged legislators of the world.”

The political novel has had a profound effect on politics over the years – the anti-slavery novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin is credited with pushing America toward abolition and Civil War, Charles Kingsley water babies with child labor laws.

One always reaches classic works such as Nineteen Eighty four and The Handmaid’s Tale to explain and rally feelings around political events. Fictional victims, who have taken the time to draw us into their psychological universe, may have more emotional power than the real ones.

But the power of fiction can go far beyond its use as a political tool in the realms of the involuntary. Take a recent US study that exposed subjects to a wacky movie about a government conspiracy – Walk the dog — and found they were much more likely to believe that a president will stage a fake war in the future than a real president has in the past. Another study found that even smart viewers bought into conspiracy theories in Oliver Stone’s movie jfkwhich mixed fact and fiction in a narrative about his assassination.

This tendency to confuse drama with reality is true even with depictions of current politicians whose stories we know extremely well. Research reveals that fact-initiated audiences have come to believe blatant lies if they see them in a dramatic documentary (a contradiction in terms if there ever was one). “In the end, when we saw the real Tony and Gordon on College Green, we barely noticed they weren’t [Michael] Shine and [David] Morrissey,” as critic Andrew Billen wrote of The agreement.

This credibility can apply even to those who witnessed the events themselves. In his book A State of playSteven Fielding recounts Geoffrey Howe’s reaction to watching Thatcher: The Last Days. “Nearly every moment my actions, my words were depicted, I was aware of serious, probably unintentional, inaccuracies. Literally, nothing was right. Yet for all those sequences where I wasn’t on screen, the disbelief was largely suspended… ‘So that’s why George’ – or Peter or whoever – ‘did that’, I found myself thinking over and over again.

It doesn’t help that politicians have discovered in recent decades that the key to electoral success is telling personal stories about themselves; become the heroes of their own dramas. Nor that they seek to draw favorable comparisons between themselves and fictional politicians. Westminster’s obsession with The west wing led to excruciating maxims such as “let Boris be Boris” and “let Starmer be Starmer” (a reference to “let Bartlet be Bartlet”, from the show’s fictional US president).

Fielding writes that Ukip once deliberately acquired a web address similar to that used by the BBC to promote The Incredible Mrs. Pritchard, a series about a popular politician. But perhaps the best evidence of this modern blend of politics with its on-screen portrayal is the career of the extraordinary Volodymyr Zelenskiy, who was elected because he played the Ukrainian president on a TV show.

Fiction influences democracy. It would be wrong to do anything about it, of course, but we shouldn’t ignore it either. Those who make films about spin-doctors are themselves a kind of spin-doctor. They have influence. We can only urge them to take it seriously.

Martha Gill is a political journalist and former lobby correspondent


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The fight against fake news is our responsibility https://ghostsofabughraib.org/the-fight-against-fake-news-is-our-responsibility/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 10:20:29 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/the-fight-against-fake-news-is-our-responsibility/ The prevalence of fake news on social media has increased. [iStockphoto] Not so long ago, the rise of social media in people’s lives inspired great optimism about its ability to smooth access to economic and political opportunities, enable collective action and facilitate new forms of expression. The world is no longer optimistic about this potential. […]]]>
The prevalence of fake news on social media has increased. [iStockphoto]

Not so long ago, the rise of social media in people’s lives inspired great optimism about its ability to smooth access to economic and political opportunities, enable collective action and facilitate new forms of expression.

The world is no longer optimistic about this potential. Social media has incredibly allowed rampant misinformation and spawned fake news campaigns to thrive.

We expected technological tools to help the world fend off common threats such as food insecurity, climate change, global pandemic, and nuclear war, among others.

However, it has become the vehicle for a constant stream of inflammatory disinformation, tailored to our individualized psychological profiles and designed to thwart social and political cohesion.

Today we have fake news, fake social media profiles, and fabricated narratives to mislead, sometimes as part of a coordinated cognitive warfare campaign. Misinformation is a threat to security, public health, civic discourse, community cohesion and democratic governance.

The dissemination of disinformation, the use of half-truths and non-rational arguments to manipulate public opinion in pursuit of political goals and disinformation, is made possible largely through social media and social messaging . This raises the question of the extent of regulation and self-regulation of companies providing these services.

Despite efforts by Google, Twitter and Facebook to combat fake news in all its forms, its prevalence on social media has increased. In Kenya, political misinformation has certainly had a lot of success over the past few months.

We also had a lot of misinformation in health, science and non-political news. The reasons for this misinformation are pervasive. It’s getting harder and harder for people to separate fact from fiction.

However, can the knife be blamed for a murder? Is it then fair to blame social media or messaging platforms solely for problems with hate messages, propaganda and misinformation? Like anyone else mobile-savvy, chances are you have unwittingly forwarded, retweeted, or shared “fake news” or misinformation online.

Whether we accept it or not, the fight against fake news is a longer process that involves education, awareness and socio-behavioural changes. It is a collective responsibility that we must assume, without intention or malice.

Several factors enable misinformation and misinformation to spread on social media platforms. Part of the problem arises when there is a high demand for information on a topic, but the supply of accurate and reliable information is insufficient. Lack of information creates opportunities for misinformation. Lessons learned from other topics such as Covid-19 vaccine ingredients and technologies show how rapid responses and proactive “pre-bunking” with accurate information helps mitigate misinformation.

To control the Covid-19 infodemic, the WHO has partnered with governments to create and distribute content to counter misinformation through a series of communication campaigns.

The consequences of ignoring the risk of political misinformation posed by these information gaps could be severe. Already, in Kenya, voter confidence in elections has plunged in 2022.

We can help citizens become critical consumers of information. Political elites can help by exposing bad behavior. News organizations can help us by telling us how they know what they know and by being more transparent and accountable about the process of gathering information.

-The writer is public communications officer at the Pharmacy and Poisons Board


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HOAX: This recruitment advertisement at the EKA hotel is a scam | by PesaCheck | Sep 2022 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/hoax-this-recruitment-advertisement-at-the-eka-hotel-is-a-scam-by-pesacheck-sep-2022/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 14:01:24 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/hoax-this-recruitment-advertisement-at-the-eka-hotel-is-a-scam-by-pesacheck-sep-2022/ The Nairobi-based hotel has disavowed the advertisement and urged the public to disregard it. An announcement shared on Facebook claiming to recruit for EKA Hotel is a hoax. According to the announcement, the Nairobi-based hotel is looking to recruit chefs, cleaners, receptionists and waiters. Prospective applicants must provide original identity cards and the job opportunities […]]]>

The Nairobi-based hotel has disavowed the advertisement and urged the public to disregard it.

An announcement shared on Facebook claiming to recruit for EKA Hotel is a hoax.

According to the announcement, the Nairobi-based hotel is looking to recruit chefs, cleaners, receptionists and waiters.

Prospective applicants must provide original identity cards and the job opportunities offer a salary package of KShs 20,000, the advertisement adds.

The ad also includes an overview map of the hotel.

However, no further details on applications or recruitment are given.

Our search for hotel details websitehis Facebook page and Twitter account, where the hotel regularly publishes such advertisements, does not reveal any such job offers.

The hotel, through a Facebook post on September 8, 2022, disavowed the recruitment campaign.

“Our attention has been drawn to the circulation of the publications below on social networks. Please note that this is a fake. All job openings at Hotel Eka will always be posted on the hotel website or on our official social media pages,” the post read.

EKA Hotel’s online sales manager, Wycliff Mokaya, also dismissed the ad, calling it fake.

“Please note that this is false advertising and has not been sanctioned by Eka Hotel,” Mokaya said in an email response to the PesaCheck inquiry.

PesaCheck reviewed the recruitment ad at the EKA hotel and found it to be a hoax.

This post is part of an ongoing series of PesaCheck fact checks examining content marked as potential misinformation on Facebook and other social media platforms.

By partnering with Facebook and similar social media platforms, third-party fact-checking organizations like PesaCheck help tell fact from fiction. We do this by giving audiences deeper insight and context into the posts they see in their social media feeds.

Have you spotted what you think is fake or false information on Facebook? Here’s how you can report. And, here is more information on The PesaCheck methodology to check for questionable content.

This fact check was written by PesaCheck’s senior fact checker Simon Muli and edited by the editor of PesaCheck Cedrick Irakoze and acting editor Francois Mwaniki.

The article has been approved for publication by the editor of PesaCheck Doreen Wainainah.

PesaCheck is the first public finance fact-checking initiative in East Africa. It was co-founded by Catherine Gicheru and Justin Arensteinand is incubated by the continent’s largest civic tech and data journalism accelerator: Code for Africa. It aims to help the public separate fact from fiction in public statements about the numbers that shape our world, with particular emphasis on public finance statements that shape government delivery of public services and development goals. (SDGs), such as health care, rural development and access to water/sanitation. PesaCheck also tests the accuracy of media reporting. To learn more about the project, visit pesacheck.org.

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PesaCheck is an initiative of Code for Africathrough his fund innovateAFRICAwith the support of Deutsche Welle Academyin partnership with a coalition of local African media and other civic watch organizations.



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blond | Coil World | timesnewspapers.com https://ghostsofabughraib.org/blond-coil-world-timesnewspapers-com/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 13:34:00 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/blond-coil-world-timesnewspapers-com/ THE PARCEL: Opening in 1933 Los Angeles, Norma Jeane Mortenson (Lily Fisher/Ana de Armas) who would become Marilyn Monroe, suffers from a childhood of abuse and neglect. Abandoned by her father, abused by her mentally unstable mother, Norma Jeane is finally brought to a home for orphans. In her late teens, she was “discovered” by […]]]>

THE PARCEL:

Opening in 1933 Los Angeles, Norma Jeane Mortenson (Lily Fisher/Ana de Armas) who would become Marilyn Monroe, suffers from a childhood of abuse and neglect. Abandoned by her father, abused by her mentally unstable mother, Norma Jeane is finally brought to a home for orphans.

In her late teens, she was “discovered” by Hollywood to continue a life of abuse, fear and mental instability.

As Norma Jeane’s career propels her to stardom and notoriety, money, fame, and marriages never fill the void of abandonment left in her soul.

KENT’S OPINION:

“Blonde” is a standout film based on the bestselling novel of the same name by Joyce Carol Oates.

The contrast between this beautiful film and the dark subject creates an unusual dynamic. Norma Jeane sees Marilyn Monroe as her stage persona, but as her fame grows she becomes her alter ego, a dark pool in which she begins to drown.

After her career as she goes from magazine pin-up girl to B-star to A-level star, her mental stability becomes increasingly sketchy.

The people around him amplify his stress. From spoiled Hollywood royalty Cass (Xavier Samuel) and Eddy (Evan Williams), husband Joe Dimaggio (Bobby Cannavale) and soon-to-be husband Authur Miller (Adrien Brody), Monroe’s failures in relationships and marriage continued to spiral descending.

Her struggles with pregnancy, abortion, and motherhood also create a very complex layer in the film. With feelings of abandonment as a foundation, her emotional struggles with abortion turn directly into a growing stain of guilt.

Director Andrew Dominik presents us with a magnificent film. It’s like opening a window for the audience to literally step back in time. The style, coloring and lighting are remarkable. The sets are exquisite and further deepen the realization of each moment. Yet despite all the care and detail put into this story, the film’s constant negativity continually weighs on viewers.

Monroe is portrayed as a victim of society, culture, family, and nature. Any flicker of happiness she might experience is quickly snatched away from her and us to continue the victimization of this poor woman. This lack of balance begins to dilute the impact of his struggles as this constant darkness overwhelms the story.

Dominik describes his film as “an avalanche of images and events”. It’s an apt description, the similarities line up with Terrance Malek’s “Tree of Life,” but the lyrical quality of this film differs in that it’s used to tell a very dark story. Norma Jeane is rarely shown to be happy and when she is, it quickly turns into tragedy or struggle. This story isn’t about Marilyn Monroe’s career, it’s about what the glitz and glamor was hiding. The detail and graphic nature of this story weakens the adjective “entertainment” as a descriptor. The rampant nudity, graphic perspectives of abortion and sexuality will sour viewers’ tastes and define why this film is rated NC-17.

The cast is outstanding throughout. The story is so tight and deftly tailored that a weak performance would stand out like a blemish on Monroe’s perfect skin. Of course, the strength of the whole film rests on the often bare shoulders of Ana de Armas. His immensely complex portrayal of Norma Jeane and Marilyn Monroe set the stage for everything this movie has to offer. His two characters are distinct, but are the same person. She bares her body, her emotions and her soul to create a sad and vulnerable victim of the society, culture and Hollywood of the 50s and 60s. She becomes the star child of the male sexualization of women, of sexual misconduct and sexual abuse. It presents itself as a cautionary tale about the abandonment of family, mental illness and the distorting nature of power.

As this 2 hour and 45 minute film unfolds, we discover that Norma Jeane has her very own “Rosebud” representing her lost youth, her fork in life’s path, and her chance at happiness. “Blonde” takes viewers into the ominous depths of Marilyn Monroe’s life, delivering a dark and depressing story of glamour, glitz and sadness.

LYNN’S OPINION:

Based on the 2000 fictional novel by Joyce Carol Oates, “Blonde” is a deeply flawed semi-biopic that blurs fantasy and reality regarding the life of movie star legend Marilyn Monroe. The reality is an alarming American tragedy, and the fiction is a relentlessly disturbing film.

With its NC-17 rating and shocking graphic sexual content, “Blonde” is a polarizing and controversial take on one of Hollywood’s most enduring icons. Norma Jeane deserved better in life, and a much better portrayal in a movie after her death.

Not that Ana de Armas doesn’t impress in a remarkable transformation as the stunningly gorgeous, breathy-voiced actress whose traumatic childhood forever damaged her psyche.

She has the looks, the voice, and the demeanor in her recreation, but sadly, she spends much of the film in tears.

She wears these memorable outfits well and costume designer Jennifer Johnson captures every look in great detail.

With such copious nudity and its running time of 2 hours and 46 minutes, at least half an hour of topless could have been cut. Not that edgier editing would have saved the film, but it certainly would have helped.

Writer-director Andrew Dominik worked on bringing this adaptation to the screen for over 10 years. The source material is deeply flawed anyway as it’s filmed as a dreamlike fantasy – so unless you know the factual details of Marilyn’s life, you’ll be adrift. What is wrong and what really happened? You will have to find out for yourself.

For example, her first husband, baseball legend Joe DiMaggio, is not mentioned by name in the credits, only “Ex-Athlete”. To be fair, Bobby Cannavale is a fine incarnation of the puncher.

As second husband Arthur Miller, Adrien Brody fares better and has the best scene when they talk together for the first time. It’s well established that Miller was captivated by her enthusiasm for “the job” and her knowledge of the literature and the characters. She had an intuitive sense of the material, but unfortunately she was not allowed to realize her great potential.

Growing up with a schizophrenic mother (a terrifying performance by Julianne Nicholson), Norma Jean was sent to an orphanage. She endured so much hardship that we see why she had such big issues with her dad and just wanted to be loved. Young actress Lily Fisher is heartbreaking as young Norma Jeane.

Starting out as a model, Monroe moved on to acting – her first role was in the Oscar-winning ‘All About Eve’ as a date with the villainous George Sanders. The studio system’s casting couch is nothing new, but the way Marilyn was brutalized by men in power is heartbreaking. Treated like a toy boy and nothing more than a sex toy is unsettling enough, and when the film dissolves into porn scenes with lascivious pals Charlie Chaplin Jr. (Xavier Samuel) and Edgar G. Robinson Jr. (Garret Dillahunt), it’s time to squirm.

(I wonder how long it will take Netflix viewers to turn off the movie after these graphic sexual encounters). The more sordid things, especially the lewd JFK scene, are painful to watch, very unsettling.

The fantasy aspect is concerning, and after revealing that she had an abortion ordered in the studio and then lost a baby through miscarriage, did we need a voice and image of the fetuses?

Dominik’s overly melodramatic and turgid script, which he describes as an avalanche of images and events, is confusing and messy, and does not serve the actress well. No one is portrayed in a good light. (Although cinematographer Chayse Irvin’s work with black and white and technicolor scenes is interesting).

The film only shows fleeting snippets of joy, and yes, its public and private images are so uncomfortably contrasted.

“Blonde” is a confusing, disturbing, dark film that does the tragic star a disservice and ends more like a nightmare because of its feverish dreamy elements. I’ll never watch this again, and I can’t ignore the things I wish I could see.


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Pandemic Aid Fraud Program, Hurricane Fiona Aid, King Charles, Memes, Spider Season. Tuesday’s news. https://ghostsofabughraib.org/pandemic-aid-fraud-program-hurricane-fiona-aid-king-charles-memes-spider-season-tuesdays-news/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 21:53:22 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/pandemic-aid-fraud-program-hurricane-fiona-aid-king-charles-memes-spider-season-tuesdays-news/ The Justice Department has charged 47 people with stealing $250 million from a pandemic food program for children. How you can help those affected by Hurricane Fiona in Puerto Rico. And what’s next for King Charles? 👋 It’s Laura Davis. It’s Tuesday. And it’s news time. Let’s go. But first, this thing fell from the […]]]>



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Media rants about Don Lemon’s past prejudices https://ghostsofabughraib.org/media-rants-about-don-lemons-past-prejudices/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 11:05:38 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/media-rants-about-don-lemons-past-prejudices/ Bill Maher thinks conservatives and liberals want to whitewash history. Friday on HBO Real time with Bill Maherthe comedian ended his “New Rules” segment with a takedown of what’s called the “wake-up call.” “You can get creative with a novel, a TV show, or a movie,” Maher began. “But the history books? This is not […]]]>

Bill Maher thinks conservatives and liberals want to whitewash history.

Friday on HBO Real time with Bill Maherthe comedian ended his “New Rules” segment with a takedown of what’s called the “wake-up call.”

“You can get creative with a novel, a TV show, or a movie,” Maher began. “But the history books? This is not meant to be fanfiction.

“How we teach history to our children has become a big controversy these days,” Maher continued. “The Liberals accuse the Conservatives of wanting to whitewash the past. Sometimes it’s true. Sometimes they do. But many liberals also want to abuse history to control the present and last month an academic named James Sweet came under fire for calling on them to do just that.

“[Sweet] criticized the phenomenon known as “presentism”, which involves judging everyone in the past by the standards of the present. It’s the belief that people who lived 100, 500 or 1,000 years ago really should have known better,” the host joked. “Which is so stupid. It’s like getting mad at yourself for not knowing what you know now when you were 10.

“Who doesn’t have moments from your past that make us cringe?” Who hasn’t said ‘I can’t believe I said that.’ I can’t believe I wore this. I can’t believe I thought that. I can’t believe I did this. You ate dirt. You wanted to be a Ghostbuster. You stole gum. You tried to be a white breakdancer. You wanted to marry Scott Baio. I read Ayn Rand,” Maher admitted before laughing and shaking his head.

“Did Christopher Columbus commit atrocities? Sure. But people back then were generally atrocious.

Real time with Bill Maher is currently in his 20e season on HBO.


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From Shetland to Midsomer, why TV crime dramas are set in such beautiful places https://ghostsofabughraib.org/from-shetland-to-midsomer-why-tv-crime-dramas-are-set-in-such-beautiful-places/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 23:19:45 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/from-shetland-to-midsomer-why-tv-crime-dramas-are-set-in-such-beautiful-places/ From Shetland to Midsomer, why TV crime dramas are set in such beautiful places Calendar An icon of a desktop calendar. to cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across it. Caret A right-pointing solid arrow icon. E-mail An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of Facebook’s “f” mark. Google […]]]>





From Shetland to Midsomer, why TV crime dramas are set in such beautiful places


































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