Fake-fictions – Ghosts Of Abu Ghraib http://ghostsofabughraib.org/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 18:44:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-120x120.jpg Fake-fictions – Ghosts Of Abu Ghraib http://ghostsofabughraib.org/ 32 32 Weekend crossword: how a fake island tricked Google Maps https://ghostsofabughraib.org/weekend-crossword-how-a-fake-island-tricked-google-maps/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 04:31:12 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/weekend-crossword-how-a-fake-island-tricked-google-maps/ Sandy Island was first recorded by the whaling ship Velocity in 1876. Image Credit: Google Maps At the end of 2012, the island of Sandy, which was supposed to be located in the region between Australia and New Caledonia, was “undiscovered”. In other words, it has been declared that it does not exist. Click Start […]]]>

Sandy Island was first recorded by the whaling ship Velocity in 1876.
Image Credit: Google Maps

At the end of 2012, the island of Sandy, which was supposed to be located in the region between Australia and New Caledonia, was “undiscovered”. In other words, it has been declared that it does not exist.

Click Start to play the weekend crossword, which explores the names of all the imaginary lines around the Earth that people have agreed to, as a standard in geography.

In the old days, explorers traveled on ships to uncharted territory in the hope of finding new lands and establishing settlements. But in the South Pacific, a mysterious island that had appeared on maps (even Google Maps) and appeared as a black polygon on Google Earth, must have experienced the opposite – an “undiscovered” or removing all charts – because when a group of Australian scientists sailed there they found open water instead of land.

But how does a supposed island make its way across the maps when in reality it doesn’t exist?

According to an April 2013 report published on the US science news site LiveScience, Sandy Island was first recorded by the whaler Velocity in 1876, and was first mentioned on a British Admiralty map. in 1908. But as several expeditions failed to find the island. , it was removed from some official maps related to the region in the 1970s. Yet it has remained on other maps and made its way into digital databases, such as the World Vector Shoreline Database, developed by the US Army.

So what did the Velocity crew see?

Some scientists believe they mistook a giant pumice raft for dirt. Pumice is formed when lava cools quickly – it traps gas inside and creates rocks so light they can float. Sandy Island sits along a pumice highway, so to speak – in 2012, an erupting underwater volcano called Havre Seamount drifted pumice off the coast of New Zealand, and it covered 22,000 square miles. Sandy Island is in the same region.

When Sandy Island was not discovered, an obituary for the island was published in newspapers around the world.

In a time when we have mapped our entire world and there isn’t much room left for discovering new lands (or even fake lands), the Sandy Island hoax was a great reminder of how our vast planet can still surprise us!

Do you know the island? Play the weekend crossword puzzle and let us know at games@gulfnews.com.


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Today’s Word Search: Real-Life Princesses That Looked Nothing Like Disney’s Versions https://ghostsofabughraib.org/todays-word-search-real-life-princesses-that-looked-nothing-like-disneys-versions/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 04:30:27 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/todays-word-search-real-life-princesses-that-looked-nothing-like-disneys-versions/ An etching by Rani Padmini (also known as Padmavati) circa 1765, in the Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris. Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons If fairy tales are to be believed, princesses throughout the ages were damsels in distress, who only waited helplessly in their stone towers to be saved. History says otherwise. Click Start to play […]]]>

An etching by Rani Padmini (also known as Padmavati) circa 1765, in the Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris.
Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

If fairy tales are to be believed, princesses throughout the ages were damsels in distress, who only waited helplessly in their stone towers to be saved. History says otherwise.

Click Start to play today’s word search, where you can spot “royalty” among other words.

The lives of historical princesses paint a different picture than what we are told in story books. Here are three examples that might surprise you:

1. Princesses could defend their house

Eldest daughter of Edward I, King of England from 1272 to 1307, Princess Aliénor married Henry, ruler of a small province of France. In 1293, when captured by hostile French forces and taken prisoner, Eleanor became responsible for securing the county. She not only succeeded in raising money for Henri’s ransom, but managed to gather what was left of her husband’s army to defend her home and safeguard her children’s inheritance.

2. Princesses could decide their own fate

Belonging to the royal family of the Singhal Kingdom, Rani Padmini was a legendary 13th century princess who was adept in war strategy and combat skills. When the time came to select a suitor, she made a condition that she would only marry the person who was able to defeat her champion. This champion turned out to be Rani Padmini herself. She managed to defeat dozens of hopes until she lost to King Rawal Ratan Singh of Chittor, who was well known for his bravery, administrative tactics, and love of art. Their love affair was short-lived, however, as the Sultan of Delhi – Alaudin Khilji – heard of her beauty and waged a war to win her hand. As the battle raged, Rani Padmini and around 13,000 of her female companions escaped to Jauhar Kund through a secret passage, where they lit a mass pyre and self-sacrificed, rather than fall into the hands of the military. by Khilji. Rani Padmini’s story has inspired many historical fictions and even a controversial Bollywood film.

3. Princesses could go against the king’s wishes

Joan of Acre

Jeanne d’Acre, daughter of Edward I Longshanks, with her fiancé Hartman of Germany, son of Rudolph I of Germany.
Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Known to be stubborn and to get by, Jeanne d’Acre married against her father’s will and even though she owed him many debts, never paid him back. His most direct snub to the king’s authority came in July 1305, when King Edward confiscated the estates and income of his son (the later Edward II). He did so to berate the prince for his disturbing favoritism in court. Despite the king’s orders, Joan sent her own seal to her brother, asking him to use it for whatever he wanted. Although others could never have gotten away with such insolence, the king was used to his stubborn daughter, and once the chastened Prince Edward returned the seal, nothing more was said about the incident.

4. Princesses could rule

tamar

A color reproduction of the 1895 lithograph depicting Queen Tamar of Georgia.
Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

George III’s daughter, Tamar of Georgia, co-ruled with her father for nearly six years as a princess, before defeating her opponents to ascend the throne at the age of 18, after the king’s death . She is known as “King Tamar” because she is the only female monarch in Georgian history.

5. The princess could go into battle

rani lakshmi bai

A statue of Rani Lakshmi Bai in Agra, India
Image Credit: Creative Commons / Jugga Dery

When Jhansi’s Rani Lakshmi Bai lost her husband at the age of 22 and was stripped of her titles by the British who were occupying India at the time, she revolted. She led an Indian army into combat, using her childhood experience learning archery, horseback riding and swordwork, as well as the tactics she learned as a girl. an assistant to the Indian Prime Minister. Legend has it that she even fought the British intensely with her adopted son strapped to her back. People still flock to Jhansi Fort, to see the spot from which Rani Lakshmi Bai jumped to escape British forces.

Which princess do you admire the most in history? Play today’s word search and let us know at games@gulfnews.com.


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Fact check: this metamorphosed image of Mount Fuji blurs the truth https://ghostsofabughraib.org/fact-check-this-metamorphosed-image-of-mount-fuji-blurs-the-truth/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 16:51:49 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/fact-check-this-metamorphosed-image-of-mount-fuji-blurs-the-truth/ Social networks have often enlightened us on the mysterious paths of nature. Whether it’s rocks, forests or clouds, Mother Nature has always captivated us with her creations. Lately, an image of Mount Fuji in Japan with multi-layered cloud formations above its peak circulating on the Internet. Several users have posted this image showing a formation […]]]>

Social networks have often enlightened us on the mysterious paths of nature. Whether it’s rocks, forests or clouds, Mother Nature has always captivated us with her creations.

Lately, an image of Mount Fuji in Japan with multi-layered cloud formations above its peak circulating on the Internet. Several users have posted this image showing a formation of evenly stacked sharp clouds over Mount Fuji. The caption reads: “Lenticular clouds hover over Mount Fuji in Japan”.

India Today Anti Fake News War Room (AFWA) discovered that it was a retouched photo. The actual image was taken by a Raymond R Carr in 2005. In the actual image, only one layer of lenticular cloud can be seen. The other layers were digitally added into the viral image.

AFWA probe

Using the reverse image search, we found the original image, which was posted by a Raymond R Carr on his Flickr account on March 15, 2005. The caption with the image reads: “Just an interesting cloud formation that has formed over Fujijama looks a bit like the hats some rice farmers wear.”

By comparing the original and viral images, one can easily spot the differences. In the original image, a single layer of lenticular cloud can be seen, while in the viral image, multiple layers of clouds have been digitally added.

We also noticed that the original photograph has been flipped horizontally in the viral image so that it looks different. Identical ice sheet formation can be seen on both images but on opposite sides because the viral image has been inverted.

Lenticular cloud and Mount Fuji

Lenticular clouds look a lot like the traditional flying saucers in science fiction. These strange, unnatural lens-shaped clouds form when the air is stable and winds blow over mountains from the same or a similar direction at different heights across the troposphere.

Mount Fuji, also called Fujiyama or Fuji-san in Japanese, is the highest mountain in Japan. With a height of 12,388 feet, it is located approximately 60 miles west of Tokyo. It is an active volcano but dormant since its last eruptions in 1707.

The formation of lenticular clouds over Mount Fuji is a familiar natural occurrence. Several Getty images show lenticular cloud formations above this mountain. These images can be seen here and here.

But the viral image is not real and was created digitally.

ClaimLenticular clouds over Mount Fuji in Japan. ConclusionThis is a retouched photo. The actual image was taken by a Raymond R Carr in 2005. In the actual image, only one layer of lenticular cloud can be seen. The other layers were digitally added into the viral image.

JHOOTH BOLE KAUVA KAATE

The number of crows determines the intensity of the lie.

  • 1 crow: half true
  • 2 crows: mostly lies
  • 3 crows: Absolutely false


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“A Time Outside This Time” asks uncomfortable questions of responsibility and complicity https://ghostsofabughraib.org/a-time-outside-this-time-asks-uncomfortable-questions-of-responsibility-and-complicity/ Sun, 21 Nov 2021 03:00:00 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/a-time-outside-this-time-asks-uncomfortable-questions-of-responsibility-and-complicity/ Amitava Kumar A time outside of this time reads less like a novel and more like a validation of all the fears, anger and disbelief with which we have lived in recent years, in the face of the worrying rise of global right-wing extremism, an ever-widening intolerance of ” other “, and the relentless nightmare […]]]>

Amitava Kumar A time outside of this time reads less like a novel and more like a validation of all the fears, anger and disbelief with which we have lived in recent years, in the face of the worrying rise of global right-wing extremism, an ever-widening intolerance of ” other “, and the relentless nightmare of a virus that has brought all humanity to its knees. It reads less like a novel than a mediation on the collective trauma of a world plunging into despair.

It reads less like a novel and more like a collective sigh of relief to have found a community that struggles with the same concerns, the same challenges and desperately tries to hold on to the tenuous hope that things will change, that there will to be a time outside of this terrible time.

Lies and Perceptions

Written as a first-person narrative, the tale begins with a writing fellowship amid a motley team of researchers from various disciplines, in glamorous European surroundings, a villa on an island, close to “where George and Amal Clooney spend their summers. “Its temporal location appears to be in early 2020, just before the virus began its devastating death march.

The narrator, journalist / writer of fiction and non-fiction, works on a novel that is interested in lies and deception but also in how these are received / consumed and what this says about public behavior , ethics and nebulous morality of a post-truth world. He states that the idea for the book, tentatively titled Enemies of the people, was born two days after the start of Donald Trump’s presidency, amid false news already spread to receptive citizens.

Satya, our novelist-narrator, tells us that the main question her novel explores is: “Who among your neighbors will look away when an authority figure comes to your door and puts a boot in your face?” Perhaps the corollary to this is also important. Which of our neighbors goes not look the other way when that boot in the face comes in?

This ambiguous space of action / inaction and how much each of us is willing to be complicit in the progressive erosion of the rights and freedoms of individuals and communities and of ethnic / linguistic / religious minorities, is what the book is all about. Kumar complex seems to be involved.

India United States bhai bhai

Kumar made explicit the kinship relationship between India and the United States. Both led by leaders with totalitarian leanings, both thriving on a systemic discrediting of verified, science-based, and evidence-based information as the pandemic struck. The parallels are as obvious as they are irritating. Hate crimes in America have focused on race; in India, on caste and religion.

While the United States sponsored racial hatred with Trump’s insistence on the “Chinese virus” nomenclature, Indian ministers and godfathers / women touted magical ways to “boost immunity.” Even as the crisis escalated, Trump claimed they had it under control, that everything would be fine, calling the virus a Democrats’ “new hoax”. Meanwhile in India we have been urged to clap, beat plates and ring bells, ostensibly in support of health workers, but interpreted by ruling party spokespersons as a way to fight against the virus since “the ancient Hindu scriptures tell us that temple bells and blowing in conch kills germs.”

Before the rational world finished delving into this inanity, we were inundated with similar “ancient wisdom” about how to light candles. en masse was going to burn the virus. Kumar pulls these examples together, reinforcing his case for ridicule and large-scale validation of the “fake news” and “alternative facts” that defined the state’s responses to a massive threat to life and resources. subsistence in India and the United States.

Fake news, Satya insists, is starting to shape public perception. The phenomenal success of WhatsApp in India and the ease with which WhatsApp is presented as gospel truth is testament to Satya’s claim. It is “a formula, often sentimental, and has a sickening repetitiveness quality (…) It exists to create uncompromising believers in an incomplete and intolerant view of the world”. The lies sold to us by those in positions of power take on a life of their own, generating wide-ranging, often violent responses ranging from people choosing to drink bleach to lynchings of those suspected of kidnapping, or worse, for trying to injure cows. .

Lewis Carroll’s Alice, while in the mirror world, may have met a queen who is very proud to have believed “up to six things impossible before breakfast,” but Trump, real and living and running the most powerful country in the world, is believed to have told an average of six lies a day, during his first three years in office, Kumar reminds us. Lies and fake news and their means of dissemination – social networks, WhatsApp, news agencies – remain the challenge of Satya’s world as much as they are ours.

What is fiction

The boundaries between fiction and fact are blurred, not only in the novel, but also in our daily reality, lived and experiential. What then is the role of fiction, in a world where truth itself has become a victim? Kumar’s answer is rooted in the writer’s sense of social responsibility. Citing as examples the short fictions of Anton Chekhov and Alice Munro, Satya emphasizes the excoriating nature of fiction. It shakes us, he says, “out of our complacent understanding of the world.” This makes us skeptical about what we think we know about ourselves and, more than that, about others. ”

Fiction disturbs. He asks questions. The fiction writer is not only a chronicler of the world, but also a modifier that changes what stories are told, how they are told, and influences how they are to be consumed. The boot in the face can only be turned around, after all, through responsible collective action. Imaginative literature, we are told, promotes reader engagement. Does the novel then become a tool for social change?

The book emphatically addresses the role of fiction in this dystopian world in which we have come to inhabit. Satya reads Orwell’s 1984, marveling at the confluences between an imaginary totalitarian regime and contemporary political structures that claim democracy but seem to largely destabilize it. Surveillance, propaganda, non-compliant citizens and demise protesters no longer just happen in the pages of 1984.

While Orwell’s book remains Kumar’s primary intertext, those of us interested in gender and assaults on bodily autonomy can’t help but return to this other dystopian text that has come horribly alive. in this disjointed period, the book by Margaret Atwood. The Handmaid’s Tale. In both cases, what seemed to be fiction has now become everyday.

Satya’s wife, Vaani (such a clever choice of names for characters exploring the nature of truth and the silence of voices – “Satya” meaning truth, and “Vaani” meaning voice or speech), in an almost academic study impartial on racism, describes it as “a part of the social subconscious of American citizens”. Human beings, according to research, she says, are trained to be wary of those who are unlike them, those who are different.

But can we possibly ignore the hierarchy of races, Kumar forces us to ask. Distrust only translates into violence in a one-way way. Power, as always, rests with the dominant majority, whether in America or India. While America witnessed the brutality of George Floyd’s murder in an act of racial mistrust, India has an unfortunate number of Mohammad Naeems and Tarbez Ansaris who were lynched for belonging to the wrong religion.

Kumar’s novel denies the reader the indulgence of oblivion. He insists on chronicling names, incidents, exact acts of brutality, removing bubble wrap, closing the gap between romantic storytelling and journalistic excavation of truths. When regimes and state archives erase or falsify the past and silence the present, it behooves the protesting citizen to keep records and chronicle our truth (s), as Satya does, when he reconstructs the story of an encounter with insurgents and the repercussions it leaves. in its wake.

Interspersed with anecdotes, literary references, reports, snippets of poetry, behavioral psychology experiences and topical news, A time outside of this time tackles uncomfortable questions of responsibility and complicity. It is fiction, to be sure, but it is also a detailed assessment of injustices, excesses, acts of violence and lack of empathy, in the face of the horrors of a pandemic. He refuses to conform to strict gender or stylistic standards, also refusing the luxury of stepping away from difficult topics of race, religion, caste, migrant crisis and hate crimes. Satya’s project could just as easily be the reader’s own – analyzing the truth of lies, resisting oppression, making sure the boot in front of a neighbor doesn’t take our eyes off us.

A time outside of this time, Amitava Kumar, Aleph Book Company.


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Reviews | Here’s a fact: we’re systematically asked to use left-wing fictions https://ghostsofabughraib.org/reviews-heres-a-fact-were-systematically-asked-to-use-left-wing-fictions/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 20:25:43 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/reviews-heres-a-fact-were-systematically-asked-to-use-left-wing-fictions/ Our time often reminds me of “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof” by Tennessee Williams, when Big Daddy said: “What is the smell in this room?” Don’t you notice it, Brick? Don’t you notice a powerful and odious smell of lies in this room? “ These days, an aroma of illusion lingers, with ideas presented […]]]>

Our time often reminds me of “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof” by Tennessee Williams, when Big Daddy said: “What is the smell in this room?” Don’t you notice it, Brick? Don’t you notice a powerful and odious smell of lies in this room? “

These days, an aroma of illusion lingers, with ideas presented to us of a supposedly brave new world that is, in reality, blatantly absurd. Yet we are supposed to pretend otherwise. Emphasizing the Emperor’s nudity is the height of impropriety, and I suspect that the extent to which we are asked to engage in this cover-up will remain a hallmark of the times: do you believe that a commitment to the should diversity be crucial in assessing a candidate for a physics professorship? Do you believe it is essential for physicians to describe are people in particular at risk of contracting certain diseases not as “vulnerable (or disadvantaged)” but as “oppressed (or made vulnerable or disenfranchised)”? Do you think that being “diverse” doesn’t make a selective college or university candidate more likely to be admitted?

In some circles these days you’re supposed to say yes.

The Department of Physics at San Diego State University is looking for a physicist. The job description asks applicants to show how they “meet” at least three of the following criteria: within the discipline, (c) have experience or have demonstrated a commitment to teaching and mentoring under-represented students, (d) have experience or have demonstrated a commitment to mainstreaming the understanding of under-represented populations and communities into research, (e) have experience or have demonstrated a commitment to expanding the knowledge of the opportunities and challenges in achieving artistic / academic success to members of an under-represented group, (f) have experience of or have demonstrated a commitment to research that engages under-represented communities, (g) have expertise or a demonstrated commitment to developing expertise in cultural communication and collaboration, and / or (h) have research interests that contribute to diversity and equal opportunity in higher education.

These are all wonderful activities and goals. However, they are much less applicable to becoming or being a physicist than, say, social work, education, or even disciplines such as anthropology and sociology. That a candidate for the university’s physics department be required to meet such criteria is a very modern proposition, and probably leaves most of the people who now read this job posting – physicists or not – to scratch or shake. the head. Yet this emphasis is increasingly found in fields related to the hard sciences: earlier this year, for example, the leaders of the National Institutes of Health announced their “UNITE initiative“, A” framework for ending structural racism in the biomedical research enterprise “.

The idea seems to be that practitioners and academics, in all disciplines, should devote a considerable amount of their time to allegedly anti-racist initiatives. This is a bold proposition, but given how fragile its actual justification is, it is reasonable to assume that in recent times this devotion is imposed by decree, as opposed to organic bestowal. And if the price of challenging that notion is to be seen as somewhere on a spectrum from backward to racist, it is a price few are willing to pay. One is more to pretend.

The American Medical Association and the Association of American Medical Colleges have published a “guide” that urges practitioners to employ a left glossary in the pursuit of “health equity”. The problem is, what they recommend would be virtually unworkable in the real world.

While caring for their patients, physicians are encouraged to model their statements to reflect that the vulnerability is not just existing, but something imposed on certain patients. This is technically true, but to what extent is it realistic – or useful in relation to the care itself – to suggest that physicians to say “Oppressed” rather than “vulnerable”? Or, based on the same socio-political perspective, what is the use of replacing the statement “Low-income people have the highest level of coronary heart disease in the United States” with “fairness-oriented language that recognizes root causes “such as” People underpaid and forced into poverty by banking policies, real estate developers gentrifying neighborhoods and businesses weakening the power of labor movements, among others, have the highest level of coronary heart disease in the USA ” ? Certainly, even in this day and age, clinicians should focus on treatment, not medical newspeak.

The chances that real doctors will ever use language like this are slim. The commitment to healing the sick makes it clear that energy needs to be focused on ways of caring for unhealthy people, rather than studiously ideological ways of talking about them and them. This means that any polite engagement with documents like this, from their very production to any forum in which their proposals are politely engaged, amounts to an act.

The jukebox musical based on “Jagged Little Pill” by Alanis Morissette features a character who is the white mother of a black girl. In one scene, friends mention that the girl will be more likely to enter a top college because she is black. The mother takes this as a slam and gives a scathing reply implying that the very assumption is racist, with the additional assumption that the audience will agree (which he did vocally the night I attended a representation).

This, however, is wrong. That selective schools regularly admit black students with adjusted standards is undeniable. Examples include “Harvard’s race-conscious admissions program” – as US circuit judge Sandra Lynch describe last year – and the circumstances of the famous Supreme Court Gratz v. Bollinger decision, where this aspect of the admissions process has been widely publicized, as among a number of other cases in recent decades.

My purpose here is not to discuss the pros and cons of affirmative action. There are legitimate arguments on both sides of this debate. My point is that the existence of various forms of affirmative action in admissions is a fact, and to say otherwise is a fiction. Beyond this musical, it is often suggested that it is fallacious, even racist, to assume that a black student was admitted to a school through racial preferences. But that leaves the question of what we must assume that the purpose of these policies was, when the educational institution defends them so vehemently.

The fact that athletes and heritage students are also admitted by preference does not contradict the fact that there are also admissions preferences based on race in many schools. It is a kind of politeness that this not being mentioned is a kind of politeness which forces us to procrastinate on a subject which is already difficult enough to discuss and decide.

All of this characterizes a thread running through our time, thicker than ever, where we think it’s ordinary not to voice our questions about things that clearly deserve them, terrified of the response objectors often receive. History teaches us that this is never a good thing.

Do you have any comments? Send a note to McWhorter-newsletter@nytimes.com.

John McWhorter (@JohnHMcWhorter) is Associate Professor of Linguistics at Columbia University. He hosts the podcast “Lexicon Valley“And is the author, more recently, of”Racism awakened: How a New Religion Betrayed Black America.



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Diana Gabaldon avoids books where bad things happen to children https://ghostsofabughraib.org/diana-gabaldon-avoids-books-where-bad-things-happen-to-children/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 10:00:04 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/diana-gabaldon-avoids-books-where-bad-things-happen-to-children/ Which, I guess, just goes to show that you shouldn’t jump to conclusions about what people want to say, at least not without a more in-depth conversation. On the other hand, maybe she was just trying to spare my feelings. What touches you most about a literary work? Honesty. Emotional honesty, in particular. Certainly, an […]]]>

Which, I guess, just goes to show that you shouldn’t jump to conclusions about what people want to say, at least not without a more in-depth conversation. On the other hand, maybe she was just trying to spare my feelings.

What touches you most about a literary work?

Honesty. Emotional honesty, in particular. Certainly, an author (more or less by definition) not only takes liberties with reality, he deliberately manipulates the feelings and thoughts of the reader. Yet an emotion that doesn’t ring true will kill a book for me.

Do you prefer books that touch you emotionally or intellectually?

I kind of think that a Well the book should do both. Even the lightest of escape fictions must have an intrinsic sense of structure, self-awareness, and intelligence. On the other hand, I totally consider laughter to be an important emotion.

What genres do you particularly like to read? And what do you avoid?

Honestly, I will read anything including the label on the Tabasco bottle if there is nothing else. Do you know what’s in Tabasco? Peppers (mashed, presumably), vinegar, and water. So simple, but do people make theirs at home? No, so why not? And who are these McIlhennys and how did they start this thing? (I posted a Thanksgiving photo last year – with our placemat for 10, with clean empty dishes (because everyone stayed home, isolating themselves during the pandemic) – but with a glimpse of the kitchen counter, which had a bottle of Tabasco on it. Some alert soul noticed it, and the company quickly sent me a cute caddy of Tabasco, with six different shapes of sauce. ‘urged to put a bottle of Krug on the counter this year and see what happens.)

That said, I avoid books in which terrible things happen to children (not to mention autobiographies of people who have survived terrible things that happened to them when they did. were children; these are fascinating) – and there is a very small group of authors whose books I don’t read because the spirit I feel behind them bothers me. (In all fairness, mine bothers a few people as well.)

How do you organize your books?

What is that strange term, “organize”…? Basically, it’s management by piles. The TBR stack (well, one of them) is out there, and contains everything from sci-fi and history to outright crime and memoir – to say nothing of “Love Drunk Cowboy” , by Carolyn Brown, that I’m taking with me to Europe on Thursday. In the office bathroom there is a stack of (mostly) historical reference books, including the one from the Firefox books that I find useful right now, as well as my brand new (used) copy of “L ‘World Almanac of the American Revolution’ (my original shattered into several pieces, having been used throughout the writing of the last four or five novels), and an intriguing thing called “How to Read Water” (a great skill to have), plus a huge, exquisitely illustrated book called “Lichens”. At the bottom of the girls’ wing (all of our kids have been grown up for a long time, but they come back for visits) is a small shelf that is stacked (the shelves are full of games like Monopoly and something in a black box with a vulgar name that I don’t have time to look at right now) with mostly popular fiction – chicks, fantasy, murder mysteries, biographies, etc. – that someone in the house has already read but didn’t want to throw away or give to the library, so here it is for anyone who might be interested. And… uh… well, several more of the same. Batteries, I mean.

What book might people be surprised to find on your shelves?

I’m pretty sure people who read my books (not to mention those who actually know me) wouldn’t even be slightly surprised if I had titles like “Medieval Punishments: An Illustrated History of Torture” or “The sex life of the Foot and Shoe”, not to mention “Blood and Guts” or “Carmina Gadelica”, “The Mask of Command” (that’s military history / commentary, not BDSM (that’s on another shelf …)), and three different books on symbology, plus a few dozen slang dictionaries.


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101 Fake News author on EndSARS exposes inconsistencies in report – https://ghostsofabughraib.org/101-fake-news-author-on-endsars-exposes-inconsistencies-in-report/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 05:32:03 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/101-fake-news-author-on-endsars-exposes-inconsistencies-in-report/ Award-winning campus reporter and author of 101 Fake News on EndSARS, Dahiru M. Lawal, among other Nigerians, exposed what they see as inconsistencies in a report submitted by Judge Doris Okowubi, President of the Judicial Commission of Inquiry which investigated allegations of brutality against EndSARS protesters in Lagos State. The panel paper was submitted barely […]]]>

Award-winning campus reporter and author of 101 Fake News on EndSARS, Dahiru M. Lawal, among other Nigerians, exposed what they see as inconsistencies in a report submitted by Judge Doris Okowubi, President of the Judicial Commission of Inquiry which investigated allegations of brutality against EndSARS protesters in Lagos State.

The panel paper was submitted barely a month after the book’s presentation on EndSARS in Abuja.

The book, “101 Fake News on #EndSARS,” identifies key misinformation that contributed to the mass destruction after the peaceful #EndSARS movement turned into violent nationwide protests in 2020.

After receiving the report on Monday, Lagos State Governor Babajide Sanwo-Olu established a four-member White Paper committee, pledging to ensure that justice is served to all concerned.

Speaking to PRNigeria, following the controversy, Lawal said he looked at the 300+ page report where he identified a number of claims that raise more questions than answers.

He said: “Much of what the panel relied on to reach its conclusions was based on accounts from protesters, the same group of people who peddled the disinformation and fake news that sabotaged the EndSARS movement. .

“So how reliable can these accounts be?

“In addition, Judge Okowubi stated that the Panel reviewed 186 of the 252 petitions it received.

“What happened to the other 66 and on what basis were they filtered and to what extent can we trust the procedure which filtered out what was taken into account and what was not ? “

Lawal also expressed shock at some of the names in the report allegedly listed as victims of the “Lekki massacre”.

He said: “For example, pages 168 and 185 of the report identify Kolade Salami (Johnson) as a victim of the Lekki Tollgate incident when in fact the media from April 2019 identified the same Kolade as a victim killed by men believed to be from special anti-sect police unit while watching a football match at a neighborhood observation center.

“At the time, Lagos police spokesman Bala Elkana issued a statement at around 6:40 pm the following Monday, announcing the arrest of the squad members who carried out the act.

Another name, Nathaniel Solomon, who appeared when the panel resumed hearing on January 30, 2021, who was also reported, claiming that his brother who died in the Lekki incident had since been buried in Mubi , in Adamawa State.

“The same name Nathaniel Solomon was also among the deceased in the report.

“Likewise, a certain Folorunsho Olabisi, mentioned on page 185 as a victim, had already been denied by the Saint-Nicolas hospital in Lagos.

However, reactions continued to follow the report from various quarters, with some describing it as riddled with concoctions and fallacies.

Social media influencer Adejare Ibrahim described the EndSARS group report as spurious and inconsistent.

Posting on Facebook, Ibrahim said the Lagos State Commission of Inquiry had done many Nigerians a disservice.

He said: “The report is a pure distortion of glaring facts and cannot, in the face of full investigation and sophisticated analysis, stand the test of time. the claim by some Nigerians that no one really died at Lekki Tollgate. “

Citing some of the examples of Kolade Johnson, Nathaniel Solomon, Florunso Olabisi among others, he said:, VI, Lagos. Hospital management then debunked the malicious allegations that they had not received any corpses at their hospital. To date, no one has countered the request of the Saint-Nicolas hospital. The fact remains that the presumed death of Folorunso Olabisi remains a myth. How the name crept into the Okuwobi Panel Report later is surprising.

Mentioning the names of Jide, Tola and Wisdom, Ibrahim simply wrote, “Honestly, this is hilarious and laughable. I don’t want to believe that a retired Lagos High Court judge approved this below-the-belt report for public consumption. For God’s sake, what is the significance of this? Who is Jide, Tola, Wisdom without names, descriptions, nothing! It is shameful !

“Kenechukwu Ugoh: his identity could not be found on social networks. The only person, whose name is close to that, is not active on social media. I have browsed the profiles of some of his family and friends. None of them said he was dead. The Panel should tell us how they arrived at his name.

“Olalekan Abideen Ashafa: No one has that name on social media. How he doesn’t have a social media address or someone declaring him dead is amazing.

“Olamilekan Ajasa: There are people with that name on Facebook. Some of them are active and alive. There is no indication that they are dead.

“These are the people Judge Okuwobi wants us to believe are dead in Lekki, when there is no specific fact to support these claims. The Panel should have understood that Nigerians are critical thinkers, who will not accept anything thrown at them with hook, line and sinker. They will always verify the veracity of anything you tell them. Nigerians are very bright.

“To this day, no member of their family has come forward. The panel tells us that they have no family members in Nigeria. After all, family members of the Ikoyi collapse victims, within hours, quickly showed up after the sad incident. Why haven’t family members of Lekki’s ghost victims show up after a year? Are they still afraid?

“The truth is that the Nigerian army, represented by Major General Ibrahim Taiwo, had told the plain truth on the day of the presentation to the Panel. The presentation was evidence-based and devoid of empty emotions. The army, as a public institution, deserves a certain respect from Governor Babajide Sanwo-Olu. Their report revealed the truth. Many of us have also presented the truth in its simplest form. Our reports deserve to be examined, not the report of those who turned out not to be neutral from the start of the report.

“In conclusion, I implore Governor Babajide Sanwo-Olu to think deeply and meditate on this report before accepting it as a fact. The report is no different from all the garbage reported by CNN, some Nigerian newspapers and their social media cronies. It is full of irregularities, discrepancies and fictions. It would be a huge disservice to many Nigerians if the report was taken into account in any way.

“Lagos State Attorney General and Justice Commissioner Moyosore Onigbanjo (SAN) should carefully review the report before issuing a white paper as ordered by the governor. Those who have killed and maimed our security guards and innocent citizens and destroyed public and private property deserve to be punished and not compensated for their criminal acts.

Okuwobi said he took 186 petitions out of the 252 received into writing his report.

PR Nigeria.


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Author of 101 Fake News on EndSARS, Other Expose Incohérences in Panel Report https://ghostsofabughraib.org/author-of-101-fake-news-on-endsars-other-expose-incoherences-in-panel-report/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 18:28:21 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/author-of-101-fake-news-on-endsars-other-expose-incoherences-in-panel-report/ 101 fake news about EndSARS 101 Fake News author on EndSARS exposes inconsistencies in panel report Award-winning campus reporter and “101 Fake News on EndSARS” author Dahiru M. Lawal, among other Nigerians, exposed what they see as inconsistencies in a report submitted by Judge Doris Okowubi, President of the judicial panel investigating allegations of brutality […]]]>

101 fake news about EndSARS

101 Fake News author on EndSARS exposes inconsistencies in panel report

Award-winning campus reporter and “101 Fake News on EndSARS” author Dahiru M. Lawal, among other Nigerians, exposed what they see as inconsistencies in a report submitted by Judge Doris Okowubi, President of the judicial panel investigating allegations of brutality against End of SARS protesters in Lagos.

The document was submitted barely a month after the presentation of the book on EndSARS in Abuja.

The book “101 Fake News on #EndSARS” identifies key misinformation that contributed to the mass destruction after the peaceful #EndSARS movement turned into violent nationwide protests in 2020.

After receiving the report on Monday evening, Lagos State Governor Babajide Sanwo-Olu established a four-member committee for the white paper, pledging to ensure that justice is served to all concerned. .

Speaking to PRNigeria, following the controversy, Lawal said he looked at the 300+ page report where he identified a number of claims that raise more questions than answers.

“Much of what the panel relied on in reaching its conclusions was based on accounts from protesters, the same group of people who paddled the disinformation and fake news that sabotaged the EndSARS movement. So how reliable can these accounts be?

“Further, Judge Okowubi said the panel reviewed 186 of the 252 petitions it received, what happened to the remaining 66 and on what basis were they screened and to what extent can we trust the process that filtered out what was reviewed and what was not? “

Lawal also expressed shock at some of the names in the report allegedly listed as victims of the “Lekki massacre”.

He said: “For example, pages 168 and 185 of the report identify Kolade Salami (Johnson) as a victim of the Lekki Tollgate incident when in fact media reports in April 2019 identified the same Kolade as a victim killed by men suspected of belonging to the police. special anti-cult unit while watching a football game in a neighborhood viewing center.

“At the time, Lagos police spokesman Bala Elkana issued a statement at around 6:40 pm the following Monday, announcing the arrest of the squad members who carried out the act.

Another name, Nathaniel Solomon, who appeared at the resumed panel hearing on January 30, 2021 which was also reported, claiming that his brother who died in the Lekki incident had since been buried in Mubi, in Adamawa State. The same name Nathaniel Solomon was also among the deceased in the report

“Likewise, a certain Folorunsho Olabisi who was mentioned on page 185 as a victim had already been denied by Saint Nicholas Hospital in Lagos.”

However, reactions continued to follow the report from various quarters, with some describing it as riddled with concoctions and fallacies.

Likewise, a social media influencer, Adejare Ibrahim, described the EndSARS group report as errors and inconsistencies on Lekki,

Posting on Facebook, Ibrahim said the Lagos State Inquiry Group on EndSARS, chaired by Judge Doris Okuwobi, had done many Nigerians a huge disservice.

He said: “The report is a pure distortion of glaring facts and cannot, in the face of full investigation and sophisticated analysis, stand the test of time. the claim by some Nigerians that no one really died at Lekki Tollgate.

Citing some of the examples of Kolade Johnson, Nathaniel Solomon, Florunso Olabisi among others, he said that “amid the spread of fake news by the protagonists and supporters of EndSARS, a Folorunso Olabisi was shot dead by the army and its corpse deposited at St. Nicholas Hospital, VI, Lagos. Hospital management then debunked the malicious allegations that they had not received any corpses at their hospital. ‘countered the request of St. Nicholas Hospital. The fact remains that the presumed death of Folorunso Olabisi remains a myth. The way the name later crept into the panel’s report Okuwobi is surprising.

Mentioning the names of Jide, Tola and Wisdom, Ibrahim simply wrote that “honestly, this is hilarious and laughable. I don’t want to believe that a retired Lagos High Court judge approved this below-the-belt report for public consumption. For God’s sake, what is the significance of this? Who is Jide, Tola, Wisdom without names, descriptions, nothing! It is shameful !

“Kenechukwu Ugoh: his identity could not be found on social networks. The only person, whose name is close to that, is not active on social media. I have browsed the profiles of some of his family and friends. None of them said he was dead. The Panel should tell us how they arrived at his name.

“Olalekan Abideen Ashafa: No one has that name on social media. How he doesn’t have a social media address or someone declaring him dead is amazing.

“Olamilekan Ajasa: There are people with that name on Facebook. Some of them are active and alive. There is no indication that they are dead.

“These are the people Judge Okuwobi wants us to believe are dead in Lekki, when there is no specific fact to support these claims. The Panel should have understood that Nigerians are critical thinkers, who will not accept anything thrown at them with hook, line and sinker. They will always verify the veracity of anything you tell them. Nigerians are very bright.

“To this day, no member of their family has come forward. The panel tells us that they have no family members in Nigeria. After all, family members of the Ikoyi collapse victims, within hours, quickly showed up after the sad incident. Why haven’t family members of Lekki’s ghost victims show up after a year? Are they still afraid?

“The truth is that the Nigerian army, represented by Major General Ibrahim Taiwo, had told the plain truth on the day of the presentation to the Panel. The presentation was evidence-based and devoid of empty emotions. The army, as a public institution, deserves a certain respect from Governor Babajide Sanwo-Olu. Their report revealed the truth. Many of us have also presented the truth in its simplest form. Our reports deserve to be examined, not the report of those who turned out not to be neutral from the start of the report.

“In conclusion, I implore Governor Babajide Sanwo-Olu to think deeply and meditate on this report before accepting it as a fact. The report is no different from all the garbage reported by CNN, some Nigerian newspapers and their social media cronies. It is full of irregularities, discrepancies and fictions. It would be a huge disservice to many Nigerians if the report was taken into account in any way.

“Lagos State Attorney General and Commissioner for Justice, Mr. Moyosore Onigbanjo (SAN), should carefully review the report before issuing a white paper as ordered by the governor. Those who killed and mutilated our security agents and innocent citizens and destroyed public and private property deserve to be punished and not compensated for their criminal acts, ”he concluded.

Judge Doris Okuwobi, who led the panel, said she considered 186 of the 252 petitions she received in writing her report.

Meanwhile, fact-checking specialist Dahiru M. Lawal is due to appear on Arise TV today at 9 p.m. on Latest Development.

By PRNigeria

Kidnapped schoolchildren

Yauri FGC students, Kebbi
153 days 7 hours 37 minutes 7 seconds,


Baptist school students, Kaduna
135 days 9 hours 18 minutes 32 seconds


Students of Tegina Islamiya, Niger (Released)

Spent 88 days from May 30, 2021 to August 26, 2021


Report by: PRNigeria.com


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Does your dog deserve a private park? https://ghostsofabughraib.org/does-your-dog-deserve-a-private-park/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 17:12:29 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/does-your-dog-deserve-a-private-park/ Maybe it’s the rats. Or the smell. Or the bad reputation of vets, animal lovers and newspapers. Whatever the reason, it seems more and more New York dog owners no longer think the city’s public dog parks are a good place for their puppies to play. “It’s unruly. Dogs knock people down, ”Rachel Sedor said […]]]>

Maybe it’s the rats. Or the smell. Or the bad reputation of vets, animal lovers and newspapers. Whatever the reason, it seems more and more New York dog owners no longer think the city’s public dog parks are a good place for their puppies to play.

“It’s unruly. Dogs knock people down, ”Rachel Sedor said of her visits to the Washington Square Dog Run, a public dog park in the West Village. “One urinated on my friend’s leg. The owner didn’t say anything!

Ms Sedor, 52, said her Australian Shepherd mix Frankie ultimately refused to enter space, which is used by up to 100,000 dogs a year. (Eileen Shulock, president of the Washington Square Dog Run, said run use doubled during the pandemic.)

Instead, Ms. Sedor joined the private Mercer-Houston Dog Run, a few blocks away, for an annual fee of $ 60.

She is not alone. For an annual fee ranging from free to $ 2,200, private dog courses offer an alternative to the city’s 84 public courses that, during the pandemic – and the canine boom it caused – became more crowded and chaotic.

In true New York style, there is a range of options, from simplicity to whimsy.

Annual Fee: $ 795 for non-guests; free for hotel guests

This tony run, which is attached to the SoHo Grand Hotel, “welcomes all dogs, big and small, as long as they’re furry and cute – or not,” said Lauren Richards, hotel manager. She said Leonard Stern is the owner of the hotel as well as the CEO of Hartz Mountain, the large pet supply company, so he “has a special affinity for dogs.”

The park is open to uninvited guests, that is, if they are lucky enough to get on a growing waiting list (and want to spend nearly $ 800 a year). The hefty price covers a Zen rock garden, a small pond, and seasonal flowers. There is also a small fire hydrant which “makes the park more interactive, a little more fun for the dogs,” Ms. Richards said.

The surfaces of the park – which come in AstroTurf and gravel – are electrically washed at least twice a week, and the hotel’s Wi-Fi is available so owners can work while their pets are away. let off steam.

Eileen Murphy and Crixus, a 4-year-old boxer, take trips twice a year to New York from Boston. Ms Murphy, 49, said the race attracted “a nice crowd of dogs.” In public parks, she said, people don’t pay as much attention to their dogs as they should.

Annual membership fee: $ 245

The West Village DOG Run on Little West 12th Street is as easy as a park could be. Looks like a prison yard.

“It’s functional, period,” said Sabrina Schollmeyer, who frequently visits Rubin, a Basenji, a rare cat-like breed that can climb trees. “It’s a space. It’s closed. He has what he needs: running water to spray the surface, bowls for the dogs to drink, a few balls.

Although naked, the spirit of the DOG race has attracted hundreds of dogs and owners, some of whom have returned – with a second and third dog – for the past 30 years.

“We are a community,” said Tracey Sides, a writer and photographer who founded the park in 1992 with her late husband, Randy. “When you walk in the door, it doesn’t matter who you are or what you do. Small dogs don’t have to be afraid here.

Ms Sides said anyone can join the West Village DOG Run as long as they have proof of vaccination and a friendly dog ​​with good manners.

“Everyone volunteers, shovels snow in winter, washes the surface in summer, dumps garbage. »The annual subscription covers rent, electricity and cleaning products. A big plus: WVDOG, unlike most parks, is open 24 hours a day. There are security cameras so people feel safe.

“It helps,” said Ms Schollmeyer, 42, “that there is a bar next door.”

Annual membership fee: $ 2,200

When she became disillusioned with public dog parks, Annie Grossman founded the School for the Dogs, which offers training programs and, according to her website, “the only dog ​​run supervised by a trainer in New Town. York “where” member dogs can have fun with their friends or just enjoy off-leash time with their favorite person in our indoor / outdoor facility.

“People sit on the perimeter of public roads and look at their phones. It’s like the Wild West, ”said Ms. Grossman, 41. “No one is in charge. It can be quite dangerous.”

Located in the East Village, the school yard, as the dog management department is called, is ideal for dogs that require a lot of attention and perhaps a little extra supervision. No more than five dogs – carefully assorted according to size and temperament – are allowed in each 45-minute playground. That’s a big plus for owners like Stephanie Higgs, 50, whose 7-year-old Papillon, Mu, is overwhelmed in public parks.

Adam Davis, who oversees some of the classes, has 10 years of canine experience and keeps a close watch on Mu, Bobby, Tacy, Lola and other Yard regulars, offering treats when appropriate and firmly calling ‘pause’ when dogs become disjointed or aggressive. .

With its steep membership fees, which covers five visits per month, the Yard isn’t for everyone, including running dogs: the small outdoor area, covered in “pet-specific faux grass.” , is not exactly a meadow. But the sessions here train dogs and new owners to understand dog play better and ideally navigate other dog courses better.

Annual membership fee: $ 60; $ 30 for people aged 62 and over

Also in the no-frills category: this downtown dog park. A concrete fenced-in area, with an enclosed tree, a concrete ramp, a bone-shaped plastic pool, and a hose to spray, you know, “things,” the Mercer-Houston trail is sandwiched between two. towers, one of which is now under construction. It is a race for members only, open to the public.

It’s not fancy, but “it’s user-friendly. There aren’t too many people. It’s not smelly, ”said Jen Railla, 51, who enjoys the park daily with her Labrador.

Annual membership fee: $ 40

Astro’s may be one of New York’s latest and greatest deals.

This Hell’s Kitchen hub is a great example of how New Yorkers can scratch a little something out of nothing, or at least very little. The park sits on a triangle-shaped plot of land between the traffic lanes near the entrance to the Lincoln Tunnel; it is an area that would otherwise be unusable. Clean, well-lit and pleasantly equipped with flowerpots and tennis balls, Astro’s is rarely crowded.

“It’s very cold – a nice, caring community,” said Peter Shankman, an entrepreneur who visits his one-year-old rescue dog, Waffle, a mix of dachshund and pit bull at least once a day.

Astro’s has a locked entrance and double gate and Mr Shankman, 49, said he felt safe inside during the height of the pandemic when hotels in the area closed and the streets were relatively deserted. “It’s wonderful,” he said. “Once you get used to the rumble of the trucks every second. “

Annual fee: None

Jackson Heights Canine Recreational Wonderland in Queens offers what Manhattan parks often can’t: lots and lots of space. JHCREW, as it’s called, occupies half a block on land donated by the New York City Department of Transportation.

Membership is open to everyone. JHCREW lead volunteer Gerald Gold said the park’s “props” – tubes the dogs can walk through, benches, solar lights, and a rain barrel that volunteers fill with cool water for the dogs – are “rudimentary”.

But the park has separate areas for large and small dogs, a luxury for space-tight Manhattan parks. Volunteers empty trash cans and patrol to make sure owners clean up after their dogs.

Green space is scarce in the Jackson Heights neighborhood, and Mr. Gold said he and his neighbors take pride in the park. After all, in a dog-eating dog world, they have come together and created a place that serves the interests of the community.


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Pamplin Media Group – Land recognition proposal splits Gladstone City Council https://ghostsofabughraib.org/pamplin-media-group-land-recognition-proposal-splits-gladstone-city-council-2/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/pamplin-media-group-land-recognition-proposal-splits-gladstone-city-council-2/ The proposed recognition of indigenous lands drew personal attacks at a city council meeting. Gladstone’s proposal to read an acknowledgment of Indigenous lands ahead of city council meetings this month has led to regional controversy and deepening political divisions among council members. Gladstone City Councilor Annessa Hartman, a member of the Cayuga Nation, put forward […]]]>

The proposed recognition of indigenous lands drew personal attacks at a city council meeting.

Gladstone’s proposal to read an acknowledgment of Indigenous lands ahead of city council meetings this month has led to regional controversy and deepening political divisions among council members.

Gladstone City Councilor Annessa Hartman, a member of the Cayuga Nation, put forward a proposal last month to begin council meetings by reading an acknowledgment of the Grand Ronde tribes who occupied the Gladstone area prior to its incorporation as city.

“It’s important because the indigenous peoples have not been recognized,” Hartman said.

Hartman’s proposal was defeated 3-4 October 12, with some city councilors expressing concern about adding to their list of items they are trying to complete before the end of the year. Ahead of the Gladstone meeting on November 9 and in anticipation of National Native American Heritage Month, city officials received signed statements from more than 30 elected officials across Oregon, including officials from state, school boards and government officials. municipal councils which have adopted land recognitions in their jurisdictions.

At the November 9 meeting, North Clackamas School Board member Kathy Wai read a statement to Gladstone officials on behalf of the Color Caucus Oregon School Board members.

“Land recognition is the first step, and certainly not the last, in healing the generational trauma suffered by Indigenous peoples,” the caucus statement said. “For Gladstone City Council to begin to heal, it would be a step in the right direction for non-natives to take the initiative and include land recognition in their daily work.”

As city officials discussed whether to reconsider their vote on land recognition, Gladstone councilor Randy Ripley announced he could claim indigenous status, citing a grandmother born in a stockpile.

Councilor Greg Alexander said Ripley’s announcement contradicts Hartman’s previous claim in 2020 of becoming the first Indigenous member elected to Gladstone City Council since Ripley took office two years earlier.

Ripley said he identified himself as Caucasian on official government documents because of his family’s other racial identifiers. He said he had not previously discussed his Indigenous heritage because he did not want to use it for political purposes.

“Complaining about this stuff is getting so old; I’ve never complained about my heritage,” Ripley said. “I don’t use my inheritance as leverage or as a commodity.”

Hartman criticized Ripley for not bringing up his legacy until now in an apparent effort to gain “weight” in the land recognition discussion.

“All of you, if you are Native American, should see this honor,” Hartman told Ripley.

Telling Hartman to “get over it,” Ripley has since maintained her statements at the board meeting, while Hartman said she was disappointed in herself for her behavior later in the meeting. .

“I’m disappointed in myself that I lost my temper, but if we can normalize racism and ignorance, we can normalize marginalized people who lose their temper,” Hartman said after the meeting.

Councilor Matt Tracy said land recognitions should not be of concern as government agencies officially recognize many other types of events and facts. Tracy sarcastically praised Mayor Tammy Stempel’s habit of announcing an obscure holiday and suggested that no harm could come from recognition honoring the Natives who previously inhabited Gladstone.

“I attended meeting after meeting where we honored Happy Bouncing Ball Day, Happy Cupcake Day, ad nauseum, in our live meetings, and I appreciate that, Mayor,” said Tracy.

Stempel said she was happy with Tracy’s reminder to celebrate the holidays at council meetings, promising to revert to her habit of announcing special holidays, but said recognition of Indigenous lands was different. , requiring an official city resolution. Hartman agreed that recognition of the land should not be compared to holiday celebrations, and compared it more to the city’s practice of reciting the pledge of allegiance before every meeting.

Ripley said he was embarrassed that his Indigenous heritage was associated with a call for recognition of the land and was “offended” by the suggestion.

“No one in my family complains where they are from,” he said.

Hartman said no one “whined” asking for field reconnaissance.

“I’m not sitting here saying it’s embarrassing that you show up in your pajamas to the council meeting; I’m not sitting here and saying it’s embarrassing that you choose to slice the pizza in front of the camera, “Hartman said, before the mayor said,” Enough, it’s over. ”

Ripley ate pizza and wore slippers at town meetings, but said he wasn’t embarrassed to do so. Hartman could only say a few more words before city officials adjourned the meeting.

“These are people who still live here; he can say it’s embarrassing that I want to do the native people honor,” Hartman said before Stempel moved to adjourn the meeting.

Hartman said the abrupt end of the meeting and the city council’s opposition to recognition of the land “seemed personal” because of his indigenous status. While she believes Gladstone’s elected officials are unwilling to listen to her, she still hopes they will listen to the growing appeals of other elected officials across Oregon.


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