Hybrid documentary – Ghosts Of Abu Ghraib http://ghostsofabughraib.org/ Tue, 07 Dec 2021 03:12:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-120x120.jpg Hybrid documentary – Ghosts Of Abu Ghraib http://ghostsofabughraib.org/ 32 32 The Kabir Cultural Center announces the winners of the 11th edition of the Montreal South Asian Film Festival https://ghostsofabughraib.org/the-kabir-cultural-center-announces-the-winners-of-the-11th-edition-of-the-montreal-south-asian-film-festival/ Tue, 07 Dec 2021 01:45:43 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/the-kabir-cultural-center-announces-the-winners-of-the-11th-edition-of-the-montreal-south-asian-film-festival/ The Kabir Cultural Center has announced the jury winners of the 11th edition of its Montreal South Asian Film Festival (SAFFMontréal). This hybrid format, online and in theaters, offered eclectic and engaging films from November 19 to 28. All films were subtitled in English and French. The festival, supported by the City of Montreal, the […]]]>

The Kabir Cultural Center has announced the jury winners of the 11th edition of its Montreal South Asian Film Festival (SAFFMontréal). This hybrid format, online and in theaters, offered eclectic and engaging films from November 19 to 28. All films were subtitled in English and French.

The festival, supported by the City of Montreal, the City of Saguenay and Heritage Canada, is the only one of its kind in Quebec to present films by independent filmmakers from the Indian subcontinent and its diaspora from around the world. The festival kicked off at the Cineplex Forum in downtown Montreal on Friday November 19 with the feature film MEE RAQSAM (Baba Azmi, India) and ended on Sunday November with the documentary EMERGENCE: OUT OF THE SHADOWS (Vinay Giridhar, Canada). A total of 54 films were shown, including 7 on-site and 47 others free online. The themes covered by the films were plentiful, including the treatment of the elderly, science versus superstition, the arts versus religion, the evils of patriarchy, the impact of Covid, and the rural versus urban divide, just to name. only a few.

Special evenings were dedicated to honor the iconic Indian filmmaker Satyajit Ray and the Iranian-Canadian filmmaker Shahin Parhami, the latter in partnership with the Festival Accès Asie and the Diaspora Film Festival in Toronto. Filmmakers were present on zoom for the films ME RAQSAM, BHAI’S CAFE and EMERGENCE: OUT OF THE SHADOWS; audiences were delighted to interact directly with the filmmakers on different aspects of the films. The hybrid format allowed organizers to gauge the audience’s readiness to return to live-action cinematic experiences in these uncertain pandemic times.

The films in competition were evaluated by an international jury and the following films were awarded:

Fiction film

Winner: Baaram (Priya Krishnaswamy, India, Tamil)
Finalist: Chronicle of Space (Sanjay Shetye, India, Marathi)
Special Mention: Songs for Rain (Krrishna Kt. Borah, Assamais)

Feature documentary

Winner: The Ice Cream Sellers (Sohel Rahman, Bangladesh, Bengali)
Special Mention: Juliet de Janani (Pankaj Rishi Kumar, India, Tamil)

Fictional short film

Winner: Washing machine (Anand Singh Chouhan, India, Rajasthani)
1st finalist: Bad Omen (Salar Pashtoonyar, Canada, / Afghanistan, Persian)
2nd finalist: No Beloved (Salman Alam Khan, Pakistan, Urdu)
Special Mention: Mixi (Jyotsna Puthran, India, Silent)

Short documentary

Winner: Dunkey Follow European Dreams (Syed Muhammad Hassan Zaidi, Pakistan, Urdu)
Special Mention: The Heroes of Our Times (Rangan Chakravarty, India, Bengali)
Special Mention: Bamboo Ballads (Sajeed Naduthody, India, Malayalam)

From Dushyant Yajnik, Festival Advisor, “ The films selected and those awarded by the jury had a common theme: How empathy, support, and psychologically secure attachments, or lack thereof, from family members, community leaders or host governments, all make the difference whether individuals and communities are thriving or failing. ”

In addition to a large Canadian audience during on-site presentations, online films were viewed in many countries around the world such as: Bangladesh, Canada, Greece, India, Israel, Italy, Japan, Malaysia, Nepal, Sri Lanka , Thailand, Ukraine, United Kingdom and United States.

The Montreal South Asian Film Festival is presented by the Kabir Cultural Center, which emphasizes year-round activities of South Asian classical arts, literature, poetry and cinema. Learn more at www.saffm.centrekabir.com.


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Panah Panahi’s Hit The Road Wins First Prize in Singapore | New https://ghostsofabughraib.org/panah-panahis-hit-the-road-wins-first-prize-in-singapore-new/ Mon, 06 Dec 2021 16:48:44 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/panah-panahis-hit-the-road-wins-first-prize-in-singapore-new/ Panah Panahi’s Take the road was named Best Picture at the 30th Silver Screen Awards in Singapore, while PS Vinothraj won Best Director for pebbles and Tolepbergen Baissakalov received the award for best performance for Fire. The Singapore International Film Festival (SGIFF) announced the winners on Facebook on Sunday (December 5th). The jury – Peggy […]]]>

Panah Panahi’s Take the road was named Best Picture at the 30th Silver Screen Awards in Singapore, while PS Vinothraj won Best Director for pebbles and Tolepbergen Baissakalov received the award for best performance for Fire. The Singapore International Film Festival (SGIFF) announced the winners on Facebook on Sunday (December 5th).

The jury – Peggy Chiao, Angeli Bayani, Kim Young-woo and Chalida Uabumrungjit – said the Iranian film “masterfully weaves a raw poetic imagination with humor, melancholy and humanism”, and praised the Indian director Vinothraj for his cinematic sense which “in all directions, the directing balances the trait of the sublime with the conflicting entanglements of toxic masculinity.” Both are early feature films.

Several Southeast Asian Short Film Awards were presented, including Best Director for Mark Chua and Lam Li Shen for A man is trembling.

After last year’s hybrid edition, SGIFF is fully back in theaters this year, hosting 77 on-site screenings (including 40 sold-out) and 19 on-site Q&A over 11 days. Over 8,000 movie tickets have been sold.

While the Covid-19 measures for cinemas remain strict, with a reception capacity limited to 50%, the SGIFF was able to bring in international guests for the first time in two years. Many Asian countries still have entry restrictions and border closures, making it difficult to travel even within Asia. Singapore, which has 96% of its population (aged 12 and over) fully vaccinated, has started its transition to life with Covid-19. Vaccinated travelers from certain countries can visit the city-state as part of the new virtual travel lane system.

SGIFF’s international guests have been quarantined for just two days, awaiting the results of their PCR tests. The filmmakers who made it here include the opening film Vspawn is mine, everyone else pay cash director Edwin from Indonesia, The edge of dawn director Taiki Sakpisit from Thailand, and Barbarian invasion director Tan Chui Mui from Malaysia, all have also served as mentors at SGIFF’s Southeast Asian Film Lab.

A few guests traveled further from Europe, including Pascal Diot and Eddie Bertozzi who spoke to SGIFF’s Southeast Asian Producers Network. Other than Chao and Bayani, all of the jury members attended the festival in person, including Kim from South Korea, Chalida from Thailand, Chan from Hong Kong and Lisabona from Indonesia.

After announcing the winners of the Silver Screen Awards, SGIFF closed on Sunday with a reminder screening of the film’s top winner Take the road and the winner of the People’s Choice Award, Some women. The latter is an autobiographical documentary by Singapore’s first transgender director, Quen Wong.

The winners of the Silver Screen Awards in their entirety:

Asian Feature Film Competition

Best film : Take the road (dir. Panah Panahi, Iran)

Best Director: PS Vinothraj, pebbles (India)

Best performance: Tolepbergen Baissakalov, Fire (Kazakhstan)

Southeast Asian Film Competition

Best Short Film from Southeast Asia: The men who wait (dir. TruO’ng Minh Quy, Vietnam)

Best Director: Mark Chua & Lam Li Shen, A man is shaking (Singapore)

Best Singaporean Short Film: {If your bait can sing, the savage will come} I love Shadows through the leaves (dir. Lucy Davis)

Youth Jury Prize: Broken leg (dir. Huynh Cong Nho, Vietnam)

Special mention: February 1stst (dirs. Mo Mo & Leila Macaire, Myanmar)

Southeast Asian Film Laboratory

Most promising project: The itinerant (dir. Ukrit Sa-nguanhai, Thailand)

Scholarship price: Rafael (dir. Paul Rembert Patindol, Philippines); and Daughter of the mountain god (dir. Pham Hoang Minh Thy, Vietnam)

Youth jury and critics program

Young Critic’s Award: Tracey Toh (Singapore)

Outstanding Contribution to the Southeast Asian Film Prize: Southeast Asian Fiction Film Laboratory (SEAFIC)

People’s Choice Award: Some women (dir. Quen Wong, Singapore)


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‘After Love’ tops British Independent Film Awards – Deadline https://ghostsofabughraib.org/after-love-tops-british-independent-film-awards-deadline/ Sun, 05 Dec 2021 22:00:00 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/after-love-tops-british-independent-film-awards-deadline/ that of Aleem Khan After Love topped the 2021 British Independent Film Awards, winning a total of six awards, including Best British Independent Film. Khan also won the Best Director Award and the Douglas Hickox Award for Best First Director, as well as Best Screenplay. Joanna Scanlan won the Best Actress award and Talid Ariss […]]]>

that of Aleem Khan After Love topped the 2021 British Independent Film Awards, winning a total of six awards, including Best British Independent Film.

Khan also won the Best Director Award and the Douglas Hickox Award for Best First Director, as well as Best Screenplay. Joanna Scanlan won the Best Actress award and Talid Ariss won the Best Supporting Actor award for their roles in the film.

Set in the port city of Dover, the film follows Mary Hussain who suddenly finds herself widowed following the unexpected death of her husband. A day after the funeral, she discovers that he has a secret just twenty-one miles across the Channel in Calais.

Khan said at the ceremony, “What the hell is this ?! … Never in my wildest dreams did I think this would happen tonight. My mom, dad and family are going to go crazy. This film, at the base, is about strangers who see each other. “

The ceremony, presented this year by Asim Chaudhry, saw Adeel Akhtar win the Best Actor award for his turn in Clio Barnard Ali and Ava, which also received Best Music for Connie Farr and Harry Escott.

The award for Best Supporting Actress went to Vinette Robinson for Boiling point, which won awards for Best Cast (Carolyn McCleod), Best Cinematography (Matthew Lewis) and Best Sound (James Drake, Rob Entwistle and Kiff McManus).

Jonas Poher Rasmussen To flee, the animated documentary hybrid, won the award for best international independent film. Riz Ahmed, an executive producer on Oscar-winning, called the film a “timely story of refugees and immigration.” As previously announced, Ahmed received this year’s Richard Harris Award for Outstanding Contribution by an Actor to British Cinema.

Ahmed, who received a standing ovation, cried through the night, admitting to approaching the donor with a mixture of “celebration and suspicion”. The Star wars The actor said he decided to accept the award as “an incentive for what is to come”. He thanked a roll call from UK directors including Michael Winterbottom and Chris Morris for proving that “geniuses are not assholes, they are really fun to be around”. He reserved the highest praise for his family, who he said taught him the “value of storytelling.”

Director Yann Demange said of Ahmed: “He created a space for a whole generation to come behind him. He made room for others and continues to do so.

Breakthrough Performance went to Nell Barlow, star of Marley Morrison’s UK holiday park, who made his Majority debut Dear, who also won the Breakthrough Producer Award for Michelle Antoniades who joked that the film was “made with a lot of love and a ten pound note”.

Cathy Brady won the award for Best First Writer for Fires, and Paul Sng and Celeste Bell’s Poly styrene: I’m a cliché won the award for best documentary. Finally, the best British short film went to Women, while the Special Jury Prize went to the organization Raising Films, which supports and campaigns for parents and carers working in the UK screen sector. The organization received a standing ovation, telling the crowd, “Parents and caregivers, we see you. And now we know the BIFAs see you too.

The BIFA Craft Awards were previously announced, with Boiling point and The Remembrance Part II take three pieces.

Andreas Wiseman contributed to this report.


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WISE announces speakers for the 2021 Summit https://ghostsofabughraib.org/wise-announces-speakers-for-the-2021-summit/ Sun, 05 Dec 2021 06:33:00 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/wise-announces-speakers-for-the-2021-summit/ Doha: A diverse group of cutting-edge thinkers, innovators and young leaders in education will come together for the WISE 2021 World Summit which will take place December 7-9 at the Qatar National Convention Center (QNCC) in Doha . WISE is an initiative of the Qatar Foundation, dedicated to building the future of education through innovation. […]]]>

Doha: A diverse group of cutting-edge thinkers, innovators and young leaders in education will come together for the WISE 2021 World Summit which will take place December 7-9 at the Qatar National Convention Center (QNCC) in Doha .

WISE is an initiative of the Qatar Foundation, dedicated to building the future of education through innovation.

The summit will feature key opinion leaders resetting the education agenda in the wake of the pandemic. They include Marc Brackett, founding director of the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence; Debora Kayembe, refugee, human rights lawyer and first African woman to be elected rector of the University of Edinburgh; and Prof. Abhijit Banerjee, Nobel Laureate in Economics and Co-Founder of Pioneer J-PAL at MIT

Alongside more established personalities, WISE will also put young people at the center of the summit with a dedicated youth studio and live broadcast channel, featuring a program entirely curated by WISE’s curatorial youth group.

Young Change Makers featured at the summit include: Gitanjali Rao, a 16-year-old entrepreneur and Time Magazine’s Best Young Innovator of the Year for 2020; Zuriel Oduwole, 19-year-old filmmaker and advocate for girls’ education; Tanmay Bakshi, 17, AI and machine learning expert and software engineer at IBM; and Kehkashan Basu, a 21-year-old climate justice activist in education.

WISE will also engage with a diverse group of artists increasingly active in education. Among them, concert pianist Malek Jandali, with his inspiring project Pianos for Peace which brings the arts to underprivileged students; YouTuber and filmmaker Samy Chaffai; the street artist and graffiti artist Akacha; and documentary filmmaker Mariam Al Dhubhani.

As with previous editions of the Summit, the identity of the most recent winner of the WISE Prize for Education will be revealed during the opening session, and the six innovative WISE Prize-winning projects will be celebrated in a special plenary session. the second day.

The Education Above All Foundation will also hold a special plenary session on the third day of the Summit, to discuss progress towards its goal of achieving Zero Out-of-School Children (OOSC).

In what will be one of the first major international education conferences since the start of the pandemic, WISE will bring together a global community of policy makers, opinion leaders, practitioners and entrepreneurs – both virtually and in person – to explore the most pressing challenges in education.

The Summit will feature around 200 panel sessions, fireside discussions, lectures, masterclasses and workshops, among others.

About forty key sessions will be hybrid, accessible to all participants, in person and virtually. One hundred breakout sessions will only be available to Summit delegates who will be present in person at the QNCC in Doha, providing them with an in-depth, immersive experience over the three days of the Summit.

Finally, approximately 60 sessions will be fully virtual, available on a dedicated WISE platform, on the WISE website and on social media, allowing participants to join global conversations about the future of education.

Most of the virtual sessions will be hosted by a wide range of knowledge partner organizations such as Deloitte, Teach for All, Unesco, Unicef, Minerva, Brookings and the World Bank.


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’14 Peaks’ captures record-breaking mission to climb world’s tallest mountains https://ghostsofabughraib.org/14-peaks-captures-record-breaking-mission-to-climb-worlds-tallest-mountains/ Sat, 04 Dec 2021 11:30:38 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/14-peaks-captures-record-breaking-mission-to-climb-worlds-tallest-mountains/ “],” renderIntial “: true,” wordCount “: 350}”> The new Netflix documentary about the Nepalese climber Nirmal “Nims” Purja, 14 peaks, has a subtitle: Nothing is impossible, and it is an appropriate encapsulation of his subject’s approach to life. Purja is like spiked Tony Robbins, an infinitely energetic man with a knack for delivering inspiring speeches […]]]>
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The new Netflix documentary about the Nepalese climber Nirmal “Nims” Purja, 14 peaks, has a subtitle: Nothing is impossible, and it is an appropriate encapsulation of his subject’s approach to life. Purja is like spiked Tony Robbins, an infinitely energetic man with a knack for delivering inspiring speeches even in the most difficult of situations. (Purja jokingly calls himself “the 8,000-meter Usain Bolt.”) Wading through waist-deep snow on Annapurna, he said to his pocket camera, “Giving up is not in the game. blood, sir. It’s not in the blood! Later he and his happy climbing team arrive at K2 base camp and boost the morale of downtrodden climbers, and in more than one case they save lives on the mountain. If anything, “nothing is impossible” ends up underestimating both Purja’s accomplishments and her upbeat attitude.

Purja is not the first to climb the 14 peaks above 8,000 meters, the altitude being roughly defined as the beginning of the “death zone” inhospitable to human life. But the fastest the series has ever been completed is in seven years, and its goal is to do it in seven months. To do this, you have to be the first climber in history to reach six 8,000-meter summits in the spring; be the first to climb Mount Everest, Lhotse and Makalu back to back in a total of 48 hours; and get permission from the Chinese government to climb the Shishapangma in Tibet. It’s a lot! But still optimistic, Purja named this series of brutal obstacles Project Possible. And not only is it possible – he and his team reach their goal in just six months and six days – but Purja accelerates the record itself while making time for several trips to help other climbers. At one point, the group spends the night on the Annapurna to rescue a missing climber almost immediately upon returning from their own summit; later they donate their own oxygen to help three climbers on Kanchenjunga. On the way back down the mountain, Purja helps a climber with high altitude cerebral edema return to base camp safely while suffering from HAE himself.

The film, directed by Torquil Jones and produced in association with Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi and Jimmy Chin’s production company Little Monster Films, follows Purja to every peak as an actual Greek chorus of great climbers explain what makes Project Possible if intimidating. (“People today, if you ask them, ‘Why are you going to the high peaks?” They say, “Because it’s fun,” Reinhold Messner says at one point. don’t think so. It’s no fun. ”) But it’s not just a documentary about Purja’s athletic achievements: 14 summits manages to fit into timely asides about Purja’s family history, his wife Suchi’s incredible self-possession over her terrifying job and near-death experience as Gurkha representing Nepal in British special forces. One of the most touching storylines concerns Purja’s relationship with her mother, Purna Kumari Purja; it’s about ten minutes of scenes that will make anyone with working tear ducts a whiny mess by the time the movie is over.

The film has already reached the Netflix Top Ten in its first week of streaming, suggesting that its thoughtful exploration of ambitious themes has won over even viewers who aren’t keen on rock climbing.

The documentary also explores how the Nepalese identities of Purja and her teammates affect their experience in the mountaineering world, with enough depth that it doesn’t look like the usual spoon-feeding of Western audiences. “The Nepalese climbing community has always been a trailblazer of 8,000 people, but it never got the respect it deserves,” he says. “I want to represent the Nepalese climbing community. Purja, an experienced climber, struggles to secure financing for the project, so much so that he ends up remortgaging his house. One scene discusses how some purists would criticize Purja’s decision to climb in a hybrid style, using supplemental oxygen above 8,000 meters. Purja’s response is that her team’s self-sufficient approach (which involves putting in their own landlines and carrying all of their own gear) is much more difficult than that of many Western climbers who rely on the Sherpas to do this job. After all, he’s used to other climbers waiting for his team to fix ropes for them. This is one of the film’s many blunt condemnations of the tendency of Western mountaineers to be suspicious in acknowledging how much they owe Nepalese mountaineers. “So many western climbers have climbed with the tremendous help of the Sherpa. What I heard most of the time was ‘My Sherpa helped me’ and that’s it, ”Purja says later in the film. “It’s wrong because it has a name. What they should say is ‘Mingma David helped me’ or ‘Gesman Tamang helped me’… Otherwise you’re a ghost.” He Also makes a point of paying his team better than Western expeditions would.

The film has already reached the Netflix Top Ten in its first week of streaming, suggesting that its thoughtful exploration of ambitious themes has won over even viewers who aren’t keen on rock climbing. “In life, you have to keep doing what you believe in,” Purja says towards the end of the film. “You have to ask yourself, do you really want this from your heart?” Is it for the glory of oneself? Or is it for something bigger? 14 summits makes it easy to believe that Purja and her partners are certainly climbing for something even more meaningful than the record itself.

14 summits is now broadcast on Netflix.


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Authors, art, soup, Tom Rush, stars https://ghostsofabughraib.org/authors-art-soup-tom-rush-stars/ Sat, 04 Dec 2021 08:30:36 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/authors-art-soup-tom-rush-stars/ If you’re looking for entertainment that isn’t just limited to Christmas, there are still plenty of events to be a part of this week. Go to a folk concert, an art exhibition, a movie. Or listen to the authors discuss their books on cooking, history and personal travel. You can join others in gazing at […]]]>

If you’re looking for entertainment that isn’t just limited to Christmas, there are still plenty of events to be a part of this week. Go to a folk concert, an art exhibition, a movie. Or listen to the authors discuss their books on cooking, history and personal travel.

You can join others in gazing at the stars, learning to photograph them, or discovering women whose work involves the exploration of space. Or you can be part of activities that help local causes and local residents. Some ideas:

Wine tasting benefiting housing for disabled Cape Codders

FORWARD (Friends Or Parents With Autism & Related Disabilities) will host WineFORWARD, its second annual virtual blue jeans fundraising gala with a wine tasting presented by Truro Vineyards. Ticket buyers are automatically entered into a 50-50 raffle and will receive three full-size bottles of wine. The proceeds will allow FORWARD to begin development of eight new affordable housing units for adults with functional autism in need of supportive care.

When: 6 pm-7.30pm Friday

Or: Focus on the event

Admission: $ 90 to $ 160

Information: https://go-forward.org

In the Christmas spirit? :Lights, concerts and the “Nutcracker”: 8 ways to celebrate the Holidays from December 3 to 9

“Supper” Saturday to benefit the soup kitchen in Provincetown

The Provincetown Soup Kitchen (SKIP) will be hosting their annual “Supper” fundraising breakfast on Saturday at Tin Pan Alley during the town’s Holly Folly celebration. For sale, 12-ounce cups of hot soup supplied by over 30 local restaurants and other businesses. A cash bar will be open and there will be piano playing. Pints ​​of cold take-out soup will be available for $ 15 at the nearby fire station at 254 Commercial Street, where SKIP merchandise such as t-shirts and mugs will also be available for sale.

When: 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Saturday

Or: Tin Pan Alley, 269 Commercial Street, Provincetown

Admission: $ 8 per serving

Information: https://skipfood.org

Photographer Timothy Little will share images of Cape Town and the islands after dark.

Photographing Cape Town and the islands after dark

The Cape Cod Museum of Natural History will present a lecture on “Milky Way to Vacation” with Naturescape Gallery photographer and artist Timothy Little. He will share stories and images as he takes museum visitors on a photographic journey through Cape Town and the islands after dark, including a starry sky over the National Seashore, lights over Cape Cod Bay and the decorated streets of Edgartown during the holiday season. Little will offer some tips and tricks for creating these images.

When: 1 p.m. Saturday

Or: Cape Cod Natural History Museum, 869 Main Street, Brewster

Admission: $ 10 adults, $ 5 children (entrance to the museum)

Information: https://ccmnh.org

Works by several Trappist monks are currently on display at the Cape Cod Cultural Center.

See the works of artists from Saint-Joseph Abbey

The Cape Cod Cultural Center will host a reception for three art exhibitions, including “View from the Cloister,” which features artwork in multiple media created by the Trappist monks of St Joseph’s Abbey in Spencer. Massachusetts Abbey has several monks who practice a visual art form: painting, drawing, collage, ceramics, and textiles. The exhibition will be on view until December 18. The jury exhibition “Off the Wall” and “Tranquil Treasures of Cape Cod” is also on display at the center and as part of the reception, oil paintings by Joe Gallant.

When: reception 2 pm-5pm Saturday

Or: Cape Cod Cultural Center, 307 Old Main Street, South Yarmouth

Admission: To free

Information: https://cultural-center.org

This new poster from the Provincetown Art Gallery Association features the work of 18 artists from 18 different galleries and is sold signed and unsigned as a fundraiser.

New poster project revives old tradition

The Provincetown Art Gallery Association, born as a collaborative group during the most difficult day of pandemic shutdowns, will rekindle an old tradition as a fundraiser for the holidays. The former Long Point Gallery has raised funds for programming each year with the sale of a hand-signed print featuring all of their artists. In tribute, the new gallery association has created a series of limited edition archival prints featuring an artist from each of the 18 participating Provincetown galleries. A project launch party, which features signed and unsigned prints for sale, will take place on Saturday during Holly Folly Weekend. Featured artists include Salvatore Del Deo, John Dowd, Adam Peck, Helen Grimm, Marian Roth and Ellen LeBow

When: launch party at 5 p.m. Saturday

Or: Berta Walker Gallery, 208 Bradford Street, Provincetown

Information: https://provincetownartgalleryassociation.org

The Monday Morning Book Club of Australia, whose members will give virtual authors a discussion of their cookbooks on Monday.

Cookbook authors to discuss the latest book

The Falmouth Jewish congregation will host a virtual Jewish Book Council conference by the Monday Morning Cookbook Club, a group of Australian women who are writing a series of cookbooks together. They will discuss their latest book, “Now for Something Sweet,” the result of intensive research to discover, curate and celebrate sweet recipes from the Jewish community in Australia and around the world. Along with the recipes, they tell stories of family, friendship The books are available at the Eight Cousins ​​bookstore in Falmouth and can be ordered in person, over the phone or online.

When: 7 p.m. Monday

Or: Broadcast live on FCTV Public Channel 13

Admission: To free

Information: https://falmouthjewish.org

Musician Tom Rush will perform three nights of concerts at the Cotuit Center for the Arts.

Folk icon Tom Rush to perform Cotuit concert series

Folk icon Tom Rush will be joined by singer-songwriter Matt Nakoa for three musical evenings filled with stories, ballads and gritty blues. Now celebrating over 52 years of touring, Rush was instrumental in shaping the revival of folk in the ’60s and the renaissance of the genre in the’ 80s and ’90s. James Taylor, Emmylou Harris, Tom Petty and Garth Brooks are among the musicians who cited Rush as a major influence. His first recordings introduced the world to the work of Joni Mitchell, Jackson Browne and James Taylor.

When: 7:30 p.m. Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday

Or: Cotuit Center for the Arts, 4404 Falmouth Road

Admission: $ 50 to $ 55

Information: https://artsonthecape.org

The museum’s author lectures plunge into history

The Falmouth Museums on the Green will organize two virtual conferences and a hybrid event this week. Tuesday at noon, author Julie Flavell will discuss one of Britain’s most distinguished military families, as described in her book “The Howe Dynasty”. At 7 p.m. on Tuesday, reporter Stephen Kurczy will talk about his experiences in “The Quiet Zone,” Green Bank, West Virginia, home of the Green Bank Observatory. There, all devices emitting radio frequencies that could interfere with the observatory’s sophisticated telescope are prohibited, but among locals looking for a simpler way of life, Kurczy has discovered plenty of activities. At 7 p.m. on Thursday, longtime ESPN writer Ivan Maisel will speak in person and virtually about his memoirs of the loss, grief and love associated with his son’s disappearance.


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Review of “Fuis”: an animated doc is a moving portrait of a refugee https://ghostsofabughraib.org/review-of-fuis-an-animated-doc-is-a-moving-portrait-of-a-refugee/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 23:16:44 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/review-of-fuis-an-animated-doc-is-a-moving-portrait-of-a-refugee/ Amin Nawabi sits in front of the camera and closes his eyes in Danish hybrid documentary ‘Flee’ – an intimate portrayal of the enduring traumas of displacement and one of the most human films of the year. He takes a deep breath and distant memories begin to spring up, punctuated with feelings and details from […]]]>

Amin Nawabi sits in front of the camera and closes his eyes in Danish hybrid documentary ‘Flee’ – an intimate portrayal of the enduring traumas of displacement and one of the most human films of the year. He takes a deep breath and distant memories begin to spring up, punctuated with feelings and details from long ago.

He is first and foremost a young boy dancing the streets of Kabul in the 1980s, carefree as Western pop music explodes with pink headphones on his ears. Later, he sits in the backyard of his family home listening to the stories of his father, who was taken away by the Communist government and will never be seen again. Sometime after this, he recalls the shock of having fled war-torn Afghanistan in 1989 with his mother and siblings – only to be stuck in limbo with expired immigration papers in Russia post – sorry Soviet, watching Mexican telenovelas dubbed to mark the time before mounting ever more heartbreaking attempts towards a better future.

Decades of lingering anxiety, fear and buried pain unfold as Nawabi, now an academic living in Copenhagen with her boyfriend, recounts her experiences as an Afghan refugee child to director and longtime friend Jonas Poher Rasmussen in “Flee” (The film, which won the Sundance Grand Jury Documentary Prize earlier this year, is also Denmark’s official Oscar nomination.)

Rasmussen first met Nawabi (credited under a pseudonym and also co-writer of the film) when he was a high school student. The film includes her own vivid memory of seeing the young Amin being kept first, then a calm immigrant child in a strange land, struggling not to be noticed. Now, after decades of close friendship, Rasmussen is trying to record the story of his friend’s youth. He ended up bearing witness to painful truths that Nawabi had kept locked up deep within everyone around him, the film becoming not only testimony but a catalyst for catharsis.

Interspersed with archival footage and presented primarily in expressive 2D color animation footage, “Flee” grounded Nawabi’s memories in the contexts of the geopolitical clashes that left him, his family, and thousands of other refugees. displaced and desperate enough to risk danger, separation and worse for a better life.

Hosting multi-year interview sessions and descriptive memories of Nawabi, “Flee” uses the freedom of its format to paint a more complete picture of its subject, lived experiences and emotions than it might otherwise have. could have been possible otherwise. The choice gives momentum to moments of humor and tenderness, such as when Nawabi confesses his childhood crush on Jean-Claude Van Damme (who, in the form of an animated flashback, has winked at him ever since. poster hanging on his bedroom wall) and revisits a sweet bond with an older boy who reinforced a lonely and perilous episode in his life.

But it is his vivid memories as a trafficked refugee – first smuggled into Russia, then to Denmark, where he eventually arrived on his own and was placed in foster care as a teenager – that fuel some. most urgent and indelible footage, including a shocking display of cruelty on a walk through snowy woods and a heartbreaking memory involving a boat full of hopeful refugees and a passing cruise ship.

“Flee” is a work of great empathy for the refugee experience, bringing audiences closer to the fears of violence and repression that drove Nawabi’s family to leave their home and the abuse and apathy that he describes what they faced when they left. Most poignantly, it illustrates how unseen scars can remain etched on those who are violently separated from their families, homes, and the promise of safety, even long after the journey is over.

As he and his family fled from country to country, putting their lives in the hands of human traffickers, Nawabi learned to keep his head down, beware of authority figures and stay vigilant. at any time. Even in animated form, sorrow for what has been lost along the way is palpable in Nawabi’s voice. It’s noticeable as he reads his teenage diary, struggling to recognize his own handwriting in his native language as he revisits the detailed account he wrote of the family he lost in Afghanistan, though ‘he doesn’t reveal the true extent of his emotions until much later.

For Nawabi, the ingrained instinct to suppress his identity in the name of self-preservation ran even deeper: as a young man, fearful of being rejected by the only family he had if they knew he was gay, he had kept the truth obscured – a memory he recounts with great dramatic effect in one of the film’s most startling scenes.

But this kind of long-term anxiety can be exhausting and destructive. Elsewhere, Rasmussen’s camera captures silent cracks in the otherwise loving family life that Nawabi shares with his partner Kasper, whom he admits on camera he doesn’t yet know all the dark and painful secrets of his past. The more Kasper pushes them to take root, the more walls Nawabi builds.

This reluctance, he comes to understand, is mixed with his feelings of guilt over the sacrifices his family made to survive. In the film’s sweet final frame, Rasmussen lifts a veil that suggests that his friend, by telling the past tense truth, has finally started to forge his own path.

‘To flee’

Rated: PG-13, for thematic content, disturbing images and strong language

Duration of operation: 1 hour 30 minutes

Playing: AMC Sunset 5, West Hollywood; the Landmark, west of Los Angeles


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South Florida 100: With more conservative justices, Supreme Court finally looks at Roe – South Florida Sun Sentinel https://ghostsofabughraib.org/south-florida-100-with-more-conservative-justices-supreme-court-finally-looks-at-roe-south-florida-sun-sentinel/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 17:00:23 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/south-florida-100-with-more-conservative-justices-supreme-court-finally-looks-at-roe-south-florida-sun-sentinel/ Angelo Castillo, Commissioner, Pembroke Pines Last week: The people we elect are entrusted with the solemn duty of creating their own districts. When they abuse their power by gerrymandering, just to serve themselves or their political party, they are breaking their oath and committing a serious sin against democracy. More than any other, three policies […]]]>

Angelo Castillo, Commissioner, Pembroke Pines

Last week: The people we elect are entrusted with the solemn duty of creating their own districts. When they abuse their power by gerrymandering, just to serve themselves or their political party, they are breaking their oath and committing a serious sin against democracy. More than any other, three policies determine the health of our democracy – election laws, redistribution rules and campaign finance rules. When these lean towards the public interest, we do well. When they lean in favor of partisanship or personal interests, democracy does not work. Here is the proof – I bet you can trace just about any problem you are unhappy with at any level of government down to at least one of these governing dynamics. When people have free and secure ways to vote, when they elect representatives from compact and contiguous communities sharing common attributes, and when financial interests are no more important to the outcome of an election than the voters themselves – same, our democracy thrives. Regardless of party affiliation, make it a litmus test for everyone you elect. Emphasize fairness in voting, redistribution and campaign funding. Our excellent system of self-government will serve us much better that way.

Looking forward: This holiday season, take the opportunity to thank our doctors, nurses and healthcare workers, first responders, teachers and essential employees in the private sector for the good service they provide to us every day. Let’s show our thanks to them while doing our part to stay alert to the new variant without panic, to help out in the way and to take personal action where we need it. Only by building a team committed to winning the fight against COVID can we ultimately be successful. Be part of this team and play a part in this achievement. We can overcome everything together.


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Three great documentaries to broadcast https://ghostsofabughraib.org/three-great-documentaries-to-broadcast/ Thu, 02 Dec 2021 20:20:19 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/three-great-documentaries-to-broadcast/ The proliferation of documentaries on streaming services makes it difficult to choose what to watch. Each month, we’ll pick three non-fiction movies – classics, overlooked recent documentaries, and more – that will reward your time. ‘Hospital’ (1970) Post it on Kanopy. From his first film, “Titicut Follies”, shot in the State Prison for Insane Criminals […]]]>

The proliferation of documentaries on streaming services makes it difficult to choose what to watch. Each month, we’ll pick three non-fiction movies – classics, overlooked recent documentaries, and more – that will reward your time.


Post it on Kanopy.

From his first film, “Titicut Follies”, shot in the State Prison for Insane Criminals in Bridgewater, Mass., To last year’s “City Hall”, shot in Boston, the great documentary filmmaker Frederick Wiseman has created a corpus of works – “the films,” he still calls them – which doubles as a library of institutions, mostly but not exclusively American. It is striking to consider how cohesive his understated style has remained for more than five decades. and how well he was early in his career. His fourth feature film, “Hospital,” shot in 1969 at the Metropolitan Hospital in New York City, had a degree of access that privacy rules would likely make difficult today. .

He’s also the best Wiseman in miniature, because hospitals cover so many topics he would return to: the treatment of minors. The social protection system. Poverty. Abuse. Wiseman wasn’t even done with medicine: two decades later, in “Near Death,” his longest-running film and a plausible candidate for his biggest, Wiseman spent time in an intensive care unit at the hospital. Beth Israel Hospital in Boston, observing patients at the end of their lives and doctors arguing over difficult calls.

If “Near Death” presents humanity in its most fragile, “Hospital” finds above all compassionate doctors who treat, by proxy, the tumult and chaos of the city itself. A patient arrived after a transfer that a doctor said was life-threatening. A man presents with a bloody neck injury that turns out to be fine, but nearly affected a major blood vessel. In a striking scene for the time, a psychiatrist accompanies a patient in accepting his homosexuality, without seeking to change it. A girl tells her critically ill mother not to worry, minutes after Wiseman showed a shaggy-haired priest hovering nearby.

But in case “Hospital” looks hopelessly dark, it also contains one of Wiseman’s funniest sequences. A hippie who has taken what he fears is bad mescaline tells anyone who wants to hear it (including an unfazed doctor) that he doesn’t want to die. After a bit of ipecac and a string of vomiting that would be comfortable in a Mel Brooks comedy, he’s fine.

Free streaming on the artist’s website.

What is the task? This is never entirely clear in the fascinating hybrid of documentary and psychological experiences of concept artist Leigh Ledare, filmed over three days at the School of the Art Institute in Chicago in May 2017. Set entirely in one room , the film observes something known as the “Relationships Conference Group,” a gathering that brings together strangers to explore the dynamics that form. (To the uninitiated, this is more like group therapy than a business meeting.) Participants come from a range of ages, races, and socio-economic backgrounds. Among them are a handful of “consultants” – psychologists who cannot be distinguished visually from the regular members of the group, although their role in directing and potentially dominating the discussion will be examined and reconsidered before the end of the film. .

The exact subject of the discussion is subject to debate: The closest the “task” to a definition is that subjects are expected to examine their behavior in “the here and now”. (Sometimes even participants report being confused as to what they are talking about; part of the fun is observing reactions and facial language, and when people interrupt.) Conversations revolve around ideas about vulnerability, victimization , stereotypes and even if people play power games depending on where they choose to sit. The presence of the cameras – and Ledare himself – complicates matters. Participants wonder if they would behave the same if they weren’t aware of being recorded. Sometimes the chatter gets heated. When a man turns out to be a Trump voter, a woman shuts him down and demands that politics stay off the table.

“If it’s as good as it gets, then how did we get to where we are as a species? A man asks at one point, making himself laugh. But the subject of “The Task” is deadly serious. It seems to capture nothing less than the process by which people learn to trust each other – and not quite succeed.

Stream it on Hulu.

Anyone worried that social media will become a substitute for real life will find no solace in Liza Mandelup’s surreal and often funny documentary, which immerses viewers in the world of live streaming influencers. (These are different from Instagram influencers. Keep going!) With dreams of fame, Austyn Tester, a Bieber-capped teenager in East Tennessee, regularly hosts video chats in which he syncs to songs and offers compliments to her fan base of teenage girls, who seem elated at the slightest hint of attention. Sometimes these interactions happen in person, like when Austyn announces that he will be setting up a meeting at a food court on a Thursday afternoon. A girl tells her that she drove two hours for the occasion. He’s a balm for the insecurities of his followers: a versatile friend, boyfriend, parent, and mental health counselor they don’t even need the luxury of knowing in real life. At 16, he apparently doesn’t need much life experience to substitute for these things, either.

For her part, Austyn seems sincere about her desire to brighten up people’s days – a serious one that Mandelup juxtaposes against the dark environment around her, including a house invasion. with cats. Austyn’s mother says her father had substance abuse issues and beat them up, but Austyn believes he’s good at faking happiness until he does. (When it looks like he won’t, his problems begin.)

To show the community Austyn hopes to join, Mandelup accompanies Michael Weist, a teenage manager in Austyn’s line of work, to Los Angeles. He describes mentoring new influencers as sort of a time-bound gold rush. (This particular celebrity brand tends to be evanescent.) He also looks barely older than his clients. But Michael doesn’t think Austyn’s “Like” numbers are where they should be. “I wouldn’t touch him,” he said.


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The Canon CR-X300 is small, sturdy and perfect for shooting a wildlife documentary in your backyard https://ghostsofabughraib.org/the-canon-cr-x300-is-small-sturdy-and-perfect-for-shooting-a-wildlife-documentary-in-your-backyard/ Thu, 02 Dec 2021 10:30:55 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/the-canon-cr-x300-is-small-sturdy-and-perfect-for-shooting-a-wildlife-documentary-in-your-backyard/ When it comes to their cameras, there’s more to Canon than just DSLRs, cameras, and other mainstream snappers that we regularly cover here at Stuff. The company also offers a wide range of professional video cameras for television and film production and outdoor remote cameras for security and surveillance. Its PTZ (“pan, tilt and zoom”) […]]]>

When it comes to their cameras, there’s more to Canon than just DSLRs, cameras, and other mainstream snappers that we regularly cover here at Stuff. The company also offers a wide range of professional video cameras for television and film production and outdoor remote cameras for security and surveillance. Its PTZ (“pan, tilt and zoom”) line sits somewhere in the middle of these two functions, being made up of remote-controlled models designed to be set up and left somewhere for long periods of time.

The newest addition to the lineup is the CR-X300 (£ to be confirmed), a small 4K video camera (relatively – it weighs around 7 kg) with an IP65 weatherproof construction and a stabilized 20x optical zoom lens with a maximum aperture of f / 1.8 and a hybrid autofocus system to enhance performance in low light, as well as an in ND filter to ensure that it can also work in direct sunlight.

Canon says it would be ideal for reality TV or animal show production, where its sturdy build, low-light skills, and ability to rotate, tilt and zoom give it the flexibility to shoot pretty much no-nonsense. anything within reach at any time of the day, noon or night. The tilt, pan, and zoom controls can operate quickly or slowly, giving the producer behind the remotes the ability to get the right shot smoothly and steadily.

4K / 30fps or FHD / 60fps video can be output to an external recorder via an HDMI or 6G-SDI cable, but the CR-X300 also supports live streaming over IP via RTP / RTSP and RTMP / RTMPS protocols widely used. like Canon’s own XC system. Could be just the thing if you wanna recreate Big Brother for the TikTok generation, maybe?


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