Modern documentaries – Ghosts Of Abu Ghraib http://ghostsofabughraib.org/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 21:18:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-120x120.jpg Modern documentaries – Ghosts Of Abu Ghraib http://ghostsofabughraib.org/ 32 32 “The Conspiracy” Review: A History of Anti-Semitic Conspiracy Theory https://ghostsofabughraib.org/the-conspiracy-review-a-history-of-anti-semitic-conspiracy-theory/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 21:18:00 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/the-conspiracy-review-a-history-of-anti-semitic-conspiracy-theory/ [ad_1] “The Conspiracy” is a documentary that traces the history of anti-Semitic conspiracy theory, and it’s a movie you might be surprised no one has made until now. The subject, of course, could not be more topical. The film comes at a time when these insidious ideas, which seem to have the life of Hydra […]]]>

[ad_1]

“The Conspiracy” is a documentary that traces the history of anti-Semitic conspiracy theory, and it’s a movie you might be surprised no one has made until now. The subject, of course, could not be more topical. The film comes at a time when these insidious ideas, which seem to have the life of Hydra heads (you can cut them off but not kill them), reaffirm their return to politics and culture. Kanye West and his nutty tweets are making headlines, but it’s important to note that Ye’s perspective reflects the mindset of a growing number of right-wing true believers in Europe and America. This gives “The Conspiracy” a weapon value against injustice.

Beyond that, however, there is a vital and disturbing fascination in watching a film connect the dots of hate, fear and false narratives that have demonized the Jewish people by turning conspiracies about them into a greater mythology. than nature. The theories — that Jewish bankers, businessmen and media barons secretly control the world, that Jews are rogue agents of destruction — constitute a kind of alternate history. Yet, as “The Conspiracy” vividly argues, over the past 150 years these theories have been a continuous and essential part of the forces that drive real history.

There’s one thing the documentary doesn’t talk about, but I will. In the 19th century, the world, for the first time, became seriously unified thanks to the forces of the industrial revolution. Trade in goods went back further than that, of course, but it was about the increase in trade, travel and communication to unprecedented levels. It was the dawn of globalization, and the anti-Semitic conspiracy theory, hideous and fanciful as it is, is actually a myth of globalization, a vicious way of making sense of a world that has become unified a radically new way. If the world is unified, then who controls it? The answer is nobody, but the anti-Semitic conspiracy theory provides a degraded answer to this question, imposing a sickly order on natural disorder.

The roots of anti-Semitism can be traced back to Jews being responsible for the death of Christ and the 12th century “blood libel” which accused Jews of murdering children in private ceremonies in order to re-enact the Crucifixion. But according to ‘The Conspiracy’, the birth of true conspiracy theory about Jews dates back to the French Revolution, when Jesuit priest Augustin Barruel argued that the Revolution itself was a conspiracy, planned and executed by a network of corporations. secret. Barruel received a lot of fan mail, and one letter asked him why it was only in passing that he mentioned “the Hebrew sect”, which the letter writer linked, through the alleged influence of the Jews on gold and silver, controlled by the Illuminati. , the Jacobins and the Freemasons, “seeking to destroy the name of Christ wherever possible”.

Barruel, sharing this letter with powerful people around the world, became the person responsible for launching the modern theory of a secret Jewish cabal. After receiving the letter, the Russian Tsar Nicholas I became convinced that a Jewish conspiracy was invading Europe, and he began his rule by banning Jews from major cities, limiting where they could live to a desolate territory in south- west known as the Pale of Settlement. Throughout Europe, the question of whether Jews should have civil rights has been the subject of debate.

It all plays out like the piecing together of clues in a horrifying detective story. But then the documentary reaches the Dreyfus Affair, the famous case of French Jewish artillery officer Alfred Dreyfus (descendant of the Dreyfus banking clan, although his wing of the family were textile manufacturers), who was wrongfully accused of treason in 1894. Until now, the film has used snippets of animation to illustrate historical situations, but it turns the story of the Dreyfus affair into a long, self-contained animated sequence. The images, made with motion capture, have a black-and-pewter beauty, though they’re not particularly expressive, and they slow down the film.

“The Conspiracy” establishes essential links for us: how the Dreyfus affair (although it ended on a note of justice) seeded France with an anti-Semitic poison, how the murderous pogroms of the 19th century were all based on the destruction of the threat posed by the “hidden power” of the Jews, and how “The Protocols of the Elders of Zion”, the scandalous literary forgery published in Russia in 1903, became, in fact, the formative artefact of the forgeries right-wing news. It was a mockumentary in book form, purporting to record a meeting of late 19th century Jewish leaders as they launched a plot for world domination.

I would have liked to know more about how “The Protocols” came out into the world, and how the lies they contain connect to the lies of our time. (There’s not much to do between the mythical demonization of the Warburgs and the mythical demonization of George Soros.) And I wish the film’s writer-director, Maxim Pozdorovkin (“Our New President”), s relies less on stubbornness and fervor, and rather simple storybook-like animation, which at times seems to do the job that a collection of archival evidence could have done much better. Even the voices of actors like Liev Schreiber and Jason Alexander can do little to ease the impersonality.

Yet “The Conspiracy” still accomplishes something important and, at times, opening-minded. It shows how anti-Semitic conspiracy theory was the snake that slithered through World War I, the Russian Revolution (most dramatically through the figure of Leon Trotsky, the heir to the Bronstein family who fantasized that the embrace of Marxism could wipe out anti-Semitism), and the rise of Nazi Germany. The film tells how Henry Ford, who had published “The Protocols of the Elders of Zion” in his newspaper, The Dearborn Independent, made a substantial financial contribution to the fascist movement in Germany. And in doing so, it gives a new context to Hitler’s rise, a context that doesn’t allow us to say, as so many Holocaust documentaries do, “That was then, this is now.” The fact that the snake is still alive makes you wonder: where does it creep next?

[ad_2]
Source link

]]>
Daughter of a Lost Bird: Review (2022 Indigenous Film Showcase) https://ghostsofabughraib.org/daughter-of-a-lost-bird-review-2022-indigenous-film-showcase/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 14:30:21 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/daughter-of-a-lost-bird-review-2022-indigenous-film-showcase/ [ad_1] Presented at Native Cinema Showcase 2022, the girl of a lost bird is a documentary revealing the shocking ongoing treatment of Indigenous youth. The 2022 Indigenous Film Showcase continues, showing Indigenous voices and aspects of Indigenous culture to a wider audience. Such an offer from them is Daughter of a Lost Birda sometimes goofy […]]]>

[ad_1]

Presented at Native Cinema Showcase 2022, the girl of a lost bird is a documentary revealing the shocking ongoing treatment of Indigenous youth.


The 2022 Indigenous Film Showcase continues, showing Indigenous voices and aspects of Indigenous culture to a wider audience. Such an offer from them is Daughter of a Lost Birda sometimes goofy but revealing documentary about a practice that went largely unreported regarding Native Americans, and the steps being taken to address it. Indigenous tribes putting their children up for adoption is a sad reality in the United States, but the means for them to reconnect with their families is improving, and government action and dedicated research made this movie possible. Director Brooke Swaney takes a disturbing coincidence and turns it into a search for identity with alarming results.

For his 2012 short film Breathe AuraléeSwaney actress Kendra Mylencuk Potter as a native adoptee of a white family. Little did she know that not only was Kendra herself a native adopted from a white family, but her mother April was too. Being a generation removed from her heritage of the Lummi tribe, Kendra felt no connection to her heritage or any problem with modern integration. After some discussions and arrangements with her tribe, however, Kendra decided to reconnect with her birth family. Swaney, herself a member of the Blackfeet and Salish tribes, sympathized with Kendra and turned her search into a documentary.

The name “Lost Bird” is given to Aboriginal adoptees by their tribes as a commemoration. The term was inspired by a woman named Lost Bird found as a baby by General Leonard Colby after the Wounded Knee Massacre. Since then, many Native children have been put up for adoption in hopes of a better life, integration into American culture, or for financial reasons. Some children, like Kendra, managed to integrate without difficulty. Others, like Kendra’s mother, struggle with abusive households and suffer because they come from two worlds. This practice is almost ignored by modern American media. Putting it on film grabs attention and shows many stories like Kendra’s in action. The Indian Welfare Rights Act has made things easier, but for those born before its enactment, it cannot help them.

Daughter of a Lost Bird (Indigenous Cinema Showcase 2022)

Kendra’s search takes seven years. After reconnecting with her mother in Portland, Oregon, Kendra is finally invited to the Lummi reservation. She witnesses the culture with its songs and arts and crafts for the first time and falls in love with it. Despite this, there are still links to be made and she must return to her native country. In keeping with the old American mantra of “kill the Indian, save the man”, Kendra has been saved, but still doesn’t know if she deserves it.

The documentary lasts a little over an hour. It sometimes feels unfinished, with clunky edits and text breaks disrupting part of the story. The ambiguous ending and unresolved storylines may be disappointing, but they show Kendra’s journey continues and can play both sides of the issue. As an actress, Kendra’s representation might seem ingenuous, given the knowledge she’s capable of accomplishing for a character outside of that setting. Since this is Swaney’s first feature-length documentary, some leniency can be given to its flaws, and if his first effort was this remarkable, his second should be even better.

See also

Globally, Daughter of a Lost Bird does what a good documentary should by presenting a specific subject not known to the public and developing it by telling a story through said subject. The struggles of Indigenous children and their attempts to reconnect are often ignored by the mainstream media, but they are an important aspect of Indigenous culture today. The film presents the modern state of Indigenous peoples in America and investigates why their culture is dying. However, as this film has shown, reconnecting with him is easier now than before.


Daughter of a Lost Bird is available to watch on demand on November 18–25 as part of the National Museum of the American Indian’s 2022 Indigenous Cinema Showcase. Click here to read more reviews of the event.

2022 Indigenous Film Showcase: Trailer (National Museum of the American Indian)

[ad_2]
Source link

]]>
David Bowie ‘Moonage Daydream’ Blu-ray/Soundtrack Available Now https://ghostsofabughraib.org/david-bowie-moonage-daydream-blu-ray-soundtrack-available-now/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 22:28:35 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/david-bowie-moonage-daydream-blu-ray-soundtrack-available-now/ [ad_1] Available Now: David Bowie Doc ‘Moonage Daydream’ from Director Brett Morgen (Blu-Ray/Soundtrack Album) Facebook Twitter E-mail Reddit Lunar Reverie is a new film from director Brett Morgen (who helmed in 2012 Hurricane Crossfire Rolling Stones documentary, 2015 Kurt Cobain: Heck Editing and 2017 Joan). Officially sanctioned by the david bowie Estate, it premiered in […]]]>

[ad_1]

Available Now: David Bowie Doc ‘Moonage Daydream’ from Director Brett Morgen (Blu-Ray/Soundtrack Album)




Lunar Reverie is a new film from director Brett Morgen (who helmed in 2012 Hurricane Crossfire Rolling Stones documentary, 2015 Kurt Cobain: Heck Editing and 2017 Joan). Officially sanctioned by the david bowie Estate, it premiered in late August with a provocative trailer hinting at exploring some key mysteries around the late musician/cultural icon.

Here is the teaser:

After a film festival run, Lunar Reverie was released on Blu-ray/DVD on November 15.

Click here to pick up Lunar Reverie on Blu-ray from our Rock Cellar store — On sale
Click here to pick up Lunar Reverie on DVD from our Rock Cellar store — On sale

A soundtrack album accompanying the film is also available – and is a special collection for Bowie fans. A press release indicates that the album features songs spanning Bowie’s career and includes previously unreleased material, unique mixes created for the film and this release, and dialogue from Bowie himself.

Highlights include a never-before-seen live medley of “The Jean Genie / Love Me Do / The Jean Genie” recorded live at Ziggy Stardust’s last gig at Hammersmith Odeon in 1973, featuring Jeff Beck on guitar. Other rarities include an early version of Hunky Dory favorite “Quicksand” and an unreleased live version of “Rock ‘n’ Roll With Me” from 1974’s legendary Soul Tour.

It premiered with a “Moonage Daydream Mix” of Bowie’s classic track “Modern Love”:

Click here to pick up Lunar Reverie Soundtrack on CD from our Rock Cellar Store — On sale

Here is the full track listing for the soundtrack:

1. “Time…one of the most complex expressions…”
2. Ian Fish UK Heir (Moonage Daydream Mix 1)
3. Hallo Spaceboy (Remix Moonage Daydream Edit)
4. Freecloud’s Wild Eyed Boy (Live) [Stereo]
5. All the Young Guys (Live) [Stereo]
6. Oh! You Pretty Things (Live) [Stereo]
7. Life on Mars? (Mix 2016 – Moonage Daydream Edit)
8. Reverie Moonage (Live) [Stereo]
9. Medley: Jean Genie / Love Me Do / Jean Genie (Live) [feat. Jeff Beck]
10. The Light (Excerpt) – By the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra
11. Warszawa (Live Moonage Daydream Edit)
12. Move On (Moonage Daydream A Cappella Mix Edit)
13. Medley: Future Legend / Diamond Dogs Intro / Cracked Actor
14. Rock ‘n’ Roll With Me (Live)
15. Aladdin Sane (Moonage Daydream Edit)
16. Underground (2017 Remaster)
17. Space Oddity (Moonage Daydream Mix)
18. V-2 Schneider (remastered 2017)

DISC: 2

1. Sound and Vision (Moonage Daydream Mix)
2. A New Career in a New City (Moonage Daydream Mix)
3. Word On A Wing (Moonage Daydream Mix Extract)
4. “Hero” (Live Moonage Daydream Edit)
5. DJ (Moonage Daydream Mix)
6. Ashes To Ashes (Moonage Daydream Mix)
7. Move On (Moonage Daydream A Cappella Mix Edit)
8. Moss Garden (Moonage Daydream Edit)
9. Cygnet/Lazare Committee (Moonage Daydream Mix)
10. Memory of a Free Festival (Harmonium Edit)
11. Modern Love (Moonage Daydream Mix)
12. Let’s Dance (Live Moonage Daydream Edit)
13. The Mysteries (Moonage Daydream Mix)
14. Rock ‘n’ Roll Suicide (Live Moonage Daydream Edit)
15. Ian Fish UK Heir (Moonage Daydream Mix 2)
16. Word on a Wing (Moonage Daydream Mix)
17. Hallo Spaceboy (Live Moonage Daydream Mix)
18. I Didn’t Go To Oxford Town (Moonage Daydream A Cappella Mix Edit)
19. “Heroes”: IV. Sons Of The Silent Age (Excerpt) – By Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra
20. (Moonage Daydream Movie Mix Edit)
21. Ian Fish UK Heir (Moonage Daydream Mix Extract)
22. Memory of a Free Festival (Moonage Daydream Mix Edit)
23. “You are aware of a deeper existence…”
24. Changes (2015 Remaster)
25. “Let me tell you something…”
26. “Well, you know what, it’s been amazing fun…”





[ad_2]
Source link

]]>
How Martin Scorsese’s Films Record the Savage Beauty of Modern American Cinema https://ghostsofabughraib.org/how-martin-scorseses-films-record-the-savage-beauty-of-modern-american-cinema/ Sun, 20 Nov 2022 01:11:07 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/how-martin-scorseses-films-record-the-savage-beauty-of-modern-american-cinema/ [ad_1] As Martin Scorsese turns 80, a look at the journey of the neo-noir master — one of America’s greatest filmmakers — who claimed the mantle of Stanley Kubrick Martin Scorsese turned 80 on November 17. “The main anguish and the source of all my joys and sorrows since my youth has been the incessant […]]]>

[ad_1]

As Martin Scorsese turns 80, a look at the journey of the neo-noir master — one of America’s greatest filmmakers — who claimed the mantle of Stanley Kubrick

Martin Scorsese turned 80 on November 17.

“The main anguish and the source of all my joys and sorrows since my youth has been the incessant and merciless battle between spirit and flesh”, writes Nikos Kazantzakis in the first pages of his novel, “The Last Temptation of Christ”. (1952), which is the basis of Martin Scorsese’s 1988 film of the same name. Having espoused and then rejected many beliefs, Kazantzakis, a pillar of modern Greek literature, continued to seek a closer relationship with God, but remained torn between faith, art and the temptations of living in the modern world. His depiction of his conflicted life in The Last Temptation of Christ gives us a glimpse into the films of Scorsese, one of America’s greatest cinematic storytellers, who turned 80 on November 17.

Film after film, the globally cult master of neo-noir – who has made 25 feature films and 16 feature documentaries to date – courageously explores how ‘the passions that bind us together can also destroy us’. His films entwined lure of violence, crime and greed – “Mean Streets” (1973), “Taxi Driver” (1976), “Raging Bull” (1980) and “Goodfellas” (1990) and “The Wolf of Wall Street ‘ (2013) — are the benchmarks of a style of cinema that the author has joyfully appropriated: these films betray the “savage beauty of great intensity and great truth”. They are also, in the popular imagination, the receptacle of all the trademarks of Scorsese: long tracking shots, freeze frames, split-diopters, slow motion, crime, corruption, bad blood, violence.

The master author

Scorsese rightfully claimed the mantle of Stanley Kubrick (1928-1999), a true master of modern cinema, whose thirteen feature films and three short documentaries are intellectually rigorous, narratively stimulating and technologically avant-garde; Kubrick and Federico Fellini (1920-1993) most inspired the Italian-American filmmaker. Over a career spanning five and a half decades, Maty (as Martin Scorsese is known in his circle of admirers) made a series of films imbued with the noirish element of gangster violence: “Mean Streets”, ” Taxi Driver’, ‘Goodfellas’ and ‘Casino’ (1995).

Advertising

Announcement Choco-pie

Read also : Kantara Makers v Thaikuddam Bridge: Kerala Group to File Another Case

These films are Scorsese classics as they bring to the fore the dramatic themes that preoccupied him: violence, corruption and moral decay. However, with their tremendous allure, these films have also led Scorsese to be cast into a stereotypical image as a filmmaker who revels in savagery on celluloid, in the same way that Billy Wilder is seen primarily as a maker of goofy comedies or Woody Allen as the existentialist comedy/drama maker. However, as Mark T. Conard writes in the Introduction to “The Philosophy of Martin Scorsese” ((2007), a volume of essays, this stereotype of Scorsese is unwarranted since his films encompass a wide range of subjects and themes.

Wilder was pigeonholed because of his two extremely famous films: “The Seven Year Itch” (1955) and “Some Like It Hot” (1959). Likewise, Allen was put on hold because of ‘Annie Hall’ (1977) and ‘Manhattan’ (1979). But why forget that Wilder also made “Double Indemnity” (1944) and “Sunset Boulevard” (1950)? Similarly, Allen’s oeuvre also includes ‘Interiors’ (1978), ‘Another Woman’ (1988) and ‘Match Point’ (2005). Scorsese, for his part, also directed “Kundun” (1997) – the story of the youth of the 14th and current Dalai Lama – and “The Last Temptation of Christ” and The Aviator (2004). He is inspired by the social mores of 19th century New York in “The Age of Innocence” (1993), the billiard scramble in “The Color of Money” (1986) and the boxer Jake La Motta in “Raging Bull”. (1980). . Besides narrative feature films, Scorsese has also made documentaries – “The Last Waltz” (1978) and “No Direction Home: Bob Dylan” (2005) – as well as music videos like “Michael Jackson’s Bad” (1987).

The beginning

Scorsese made his film debut with “Who knocks at my door”, a personal black and white film, in 1967. It marked the film history student’s serious attempt to arrive at a visual vocabulary, his effort to learn more about the art of storytelling, structure, time and place. At this point, Scorsese lacked the cinematic syntax and invention of a Jean-Luc Godard or a Bernardo Bertolucci to express the inner feelings of a “personal filmmaker”.

His attempts to learn the craft of a form of feature film – using the camera, directing, directing and performing – are also evident in the crime drama “Boxcar Bertha” (1972). Although his second feature was a significant improvement over the first, he failed to bring technical finesse and narrative refinement to the film. Scorsese was, however, able to capture the atmosphere of the story revolving around those living on the margins of society and bring the characters to life, layering the narrative with rich subtext.

Inspired by Italian neo-realism and John Cassavetes’ “Shadows” (1959), an American independent drama film about race relations during the Beat Generation years in New York, “Mean Streets” effectively propelled Scorsese’s career as a as a major filmmaker. Above all, it shattered decades of stereotypes about Italian Americans in film and television and became the first American film to present Italian Americans as they actually lived. For several decades, Hollywood had perpetuated the image of Italian Americans as garlic eaters and hotheads, but lovable and passionate either in middle-class professions (barbers, shoemakers, fruit and vegetable vendors) or as evil but charismatic members of organized crime known as the Mafia.

Read also : Cracked Mirror: The Cinema of Iran’s Infinitely Resilient Women

“Mean Streets” begins with a voiceover: “You don’t fix your sins in church – you do it on the street – you do it at home – the rest is bullshit and you know it.” Suddenly, Charlie Cappa (Harvey Keitel) wakes up. The connection between Scorsese and protagonist Charlie (Harvey Keitel) is immediately established. The Scorcese family is embodied in the film’s main character: Charles is his father’s first name and Cappa is his mother’s maiden name. Scorsese’s voice becomes Charlie’s conscience.

Morally complicated characters

Some of Scorsese’s films depict lives tinged with crime and violence and are now considered the foundation of his career. However, it would be simplistic to claim that he limited himself to a particular theme. What we can say, however, is that there are some common threads in his films that give us an idea of ​​some of the ideas he embraced as a filmmaker. The conflict between faith and art is one such idea.

Scorsese’s morally complicated characters, including criminals and murderers, show the frailty of human beings. A quest for identity is at the heart of these characters and brings them closer to the temptations of violence, lust and greed. He doesn’t want us to celebrate the hedonistic pursuits and insatiable greed of Jordan Belfort (Leonardo DiCaprio) in “The Wolf of Wall Street” (2014) or Henry Hill’s (Ray Liotta) involvement in the Lufthansa heist. in “Les Affranchis (1990). ). But the director insists that these acts are worth exploring and dramatizing. “Very often, the people I represent cannot help but be in this mode of life. . . . Yes, they’re bad, they do bad things, and we condemn those aspects of them—but they’re human beings, too. I want to push the emotional empathy of the audience,” the filmmaker, who has been criticized for portraying violence in his films, said in an interview.

Read also : What Makes Dwayne Johnson’s Weirdest Hollywood Success Story

Spanning more than a century of American history, Scorsese’s latest crime saga hit Netflix in 2019. In a New Yorker review, Richard Brody called the film a dark allegory of a reading realist of American politics and society: “The Irishman is a sociopolitical horror story that views much of modern American history as a crime in continuous motion, in which every level of society – of life domestic to local affairs to big business to national and international politics – is poisoned by corruption and bribes, shady deals and dirty money, threats of violence and their grisly execution, and the entrenched impunity that keeps the whole system going.

cinema idea

For Scorsese, cinema, although personal, is not an individual art. The collaboration has been a key force in his career, as evidenced by his series of films with DiCaprio and Robert De Niro. He continues to be in love with the idea of ​​good old cinema. In 2019, in a New York Times op-ed, he argued that Marvel movies aren’t cinema: “I guess we also need to refine our notions of what cinema is and what it isn’t. . Federico Fellini is a good starting point. Many things can be said about Fellini’s films, but here is one thing that is indisputable: they are cinema. Fellini’s work goes a long way in defining the art form.

A multitude of factors have shaped Scorsese’s distinct cinematic style. Scorsese grew up in New York’s Little Italy. In his films, he constantly returns to the criminal landscape of his hometown in the 1970s as a metaphor for the world in general. Scorsese’s struggles with asthma as a child – it took him away from a passion for sport – and his early desire to enter the priesthood also shaped his sensibilities as a filmmaker preoccupied with the constructions of community, of religion and violence.

Scorsese’s next film, “Killers of the Flower Moon”, based on the best-selling book of the same name by American author David Grann, will be released in May 2023. Set in 1920s Oklahoma, it will trace the murder in series of members of the oil industry. the wealthy Osage nation, a series of brutal crimes known as the Reign of Terror. The film marks the sixth collaboration between Scorsese and DiCaprio, and the 10th collaboration between Scorsese and De Niro.

[ad_2]
Source link

]]>
David Baddiel on Modern Antisemitism https://ghostsofabughraib.org/david-baddiel-on-modern-antisemitism/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 15:20:00 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/david-baddiel-on-modern-antisemitism/ [ad_1] David Baddiel and David Schwimmer Photo: PA Photo/Channel 4 Jewish comedian David Baddiel says there is one form of racism that has been overlooked in society’s serious fight to eradicate hate: anti-Semitism. Often, he says, Jews are seen as not counting as a “true minority,” so while they still suffer severe discrimination, they often […]]]>

[ad_1]

David Baddiel and David Schwimmer Photo: PA Photo/Channel 4

Jewish comedian David Baddiel says there is one form of racism that has been overlooked in society’s serious fight to eradicate hate: anti-Semitism.

Often, he says, Jews are seen as not counting as a “true minority,” so while they still suffer severe discrimination, they often don’t enjoy the same protections as other minority groups.

“Someone tweeted me once and said, ‘Anti-Semitism is racism sneaking past you,’ which I thought was a really good way to put it,” Baddiel says, 58 years old.

“Other forms of racism are sometimes more obvious than anti-Semitism.”

In February 2021, Baddiel published his book Jews Don’t Matter, which looks at “how identity politics has failed a particular identity” – how Jews are often left out of the conversation when it comes to protecting and to defend minorities.

Now a one-off Channel 4 documentary of the same name explores this on screen and sees Baddiel joined by other famous Jews – David Schwimmer, Stephen Fry, Sarah Silverman, Miriam Margolyes and more – who share their experiences and thoughts. .

“Being Jewish, trying to talk about the racism that you suffer from, and Jewish inclusion, or whatever…you often get this slight sense of fury, that you don’t deserve it, that’s not something thing you need,” he added. says Baddiel, who is known for his work with Frank Skinner on the 1990s comedy show Fantasy Football League and for creating the ubiquitous Three Lions football anthem.

“One of the things I talk about a lot in the book and in the movie is this notion of Jewish power and Jewish privilege, which a lot of people think shouldn’t be talked about – and Kanye West would be the one of them – they don’t think it’s racist to say that Jews are powerful and privileged.

“Because they just think it’s true, or they think it’s kind of a compliment, but obviously it’s not. It’s a stereotype, but historically it leads to immense violence against the Jews.”

But this conversation is relevant because violence against Jews is not just historical. Anti-Semitism did not begin or end with the mass slaughter of Jews during the Holocaust – which, of course, is still within living memory.

“There’s a huge increase in attacks right now,” Baddiel says.

“Eleven Jews killed in Pittsburgh in 2018 by a far-right gunman who believed in something called the Great Replacement theory and believed that Jews were responsible for controlling multiculturalism in America,” he adds, referring to the shooting at the Tree of Life. Synagogue, the deadliest attack on the Jewish community in the United States.

“They were trying,” he adds, his voice softened by tears, “they were trying to house Syrian refugees in America. And this guy thought that meant they were destabilizing the region and the white races.

“So he killed 11 Jews.”

The stereotype that Jews are powerful, wealthy and controlling is a harmful myth that Baddiel returns to throughout his Channel 4 documentary, as it is a stereotype that not only attracts anti-Semitic hatred, but also leads progressives to refuse to protect the Jewish people, because they ‘are seen as ‘not really needed’.

“What comes down to a strange logic is that if the Jews are powerful, they’re not vulnerable; and if they’re not vulnerable, if they get attacked, it’s not that important. We don’t have to offer the same protections we offer other minorities,” Baddiel said.

“I have a problem with anti-Semitism and how it doesn’t follow other forms (of racism). I think if people are cancelled, or there are consequences, as you mean, for the racism or discrimination, for public forms of hate speech, then they have to look for Jews, otherwise Jews don’t count.

“And also, we’re talking about a very, very old form of racism here. Anti-Semitism is very endless, I’m afraid. It keeps reoccurring.”

Kanye West, as Baddiel mentioned earlier, has brought anti-Semitism back to the discourse agenda in recent weeks. The rapper has, to say the least, had a fall from grace over the past few years that peaked in October, with his collaborations with Adidas and Balenciaga canceled and his net worth reduced following anti-Semitic hate speech in interviews and on social networks.

But the damage was done. Neo-Nazi groups took West’s comments as a rallying cry, and his words helped perpetuate dangerous stereotypes that Jews hold power over society.

“It’s kind of a real double-edged sword, because it raised the issue in a really big way,” Baddiel says of West’s hate speech.

“I’ve seen quite a few reactions against it, a bit different from what I might have seen a few years ago. At the same time, there are two issues with it.

“First of all, all the myths and ideas that Kanye spouts, and many of his followers will simply believe, are related to what I’m talking about – stereotypes about Jews as powerful and privileged and controlling and blah, blah, blah.

“And the other thing is that there was a pushback against Kanye, and then within two or three days I saw people saying, ‘Oh, look at the Jews trying to Cancel Kanye! The Jews with their power, they forced Adidas to do this.” So I thought, oh okay, it’s already gone bad.”

“And then, it’s just scary, by the way,” adds the comedian with serious candor.

“I was talking to my son about it yesterday, my son who is a huge hip-hop fan and identifies as Jewish. He was, on some level, clearly troubled just by looking at Kanye, who is someone ‘one he would watch, talk like he does right now on various podcasts.

“He was like, ‘Dad, I was watching Kanye. He really is a fucking anti-Semite.

“And, you know, that’s a complicated conversation to have with your son who loves hip-hop.”

By bringing this complicated conversation to television, Baddiel, a father of two, hopes to reach people who are “fighting the good fight” against discrimination in all its forms and who may have neglected to include Jews on their bucket list. minorities to protect, “people who can never thought before”.

“I want people to see it, because I’m talking about something that I think is very real,” he says.

“What I hope is that someone who is clearly a thinking person, who is a liberal, who cares about minorities, whatever, can be presented with things about Jews that they don’t haven’t really thought about before.”

Jews Don’t Matter airs on Channel 4 on Monday at 9 p.m.

[ad_2]
Source link

]]>
New this week: Lizzo, ‘Criminal Minds’ and ‘The Woman King’ https://ghostsofabughraib.org/new-this-week-lizzo-criminal-minds-and-the-woman-king/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 23:14:40 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/new-this-week-lizzo-criminal-minds-and-the-woman-king/ [ad_1] Comment this story Comment Here’s a curated collection from the Associated Press’ entertainment journalists of what’s coming to TV, streaming services, and music and video game platforms this week. — When the Mars Rover Opportunity, nicknamed Oppy, was launched in 2003, it was only supposed to last 90 sols (or days on Mars). But […]]]>

[ad_1]

Comment

Here’s a curated collection from the Associated Press’ entertainment journalists of what’s coming to TV, streaming services, and music and video game platforms this week.

— When the Mars Rover Opportunity, nicknamed Oppy, was launched in 2003, it was only supposed to last 90 sols (or days on Mars). But 15 years later, he was still exploring. The “Good Night Oppy” documentary, which airs Wednesday on Prime Video, not only tells the story of Oppy and his Spirit counterpart, but also that of the scientists and engineers who cared for the robots and their discoveries on March. With shades of some of cinema’s most lovable robots, from WALL-E to R2-D2, “Good Night Oppy,” directed by Ryan White, is a sentimental and uplifting flick and a great movie to watch with the family during the holidays. .

– If you missed Viola Davis’ turn as warrior Agojie in “The Woman King” in theaters, the Gina Prince-Bythewood epic will be available to rent on VOD starting Tuesday. The $50 million action epic, set in 1820s West Africa, tells a story about the Kingdom of Dahomey’s all-female army in the vein of movies like “Braveheart,” The Last of the Mohicans” and “Gladiator”. It was a bit of a miracle the movie even made it on the budget it had, due to outdated thinking in Hollywood, but Davis told the AP that the success of “Black Panther” was a turning. And audiences clearly wanted “The Woman King,” which grossed over $91 million worldwide.

– A lonely vampire gets a surprise when a teenager shows up claiming to be his daughter in “Blood Relatives,” a road-going comedy/horror hitting Shudder on Tuesday. It is the directorial debut of actor Noah Segan, a mainstay of Rian Johnson’s films, who stars alongside both Victoria Moroles and teenage Jane.

– Shot over three years, during the ‘Cuz I Love You’ tour, at the height of the pandemic and while recording ‘Special’, the new documentary ‘Love, Lizzo’ is an intimate portrait of the musical superstar , with a candid talk about body, self-love and being a black woman. “Love, Lizzo” airs on HBO Max on Thursday.

AP Screenwriter Lindsey Bahr

– A concert series that Tom Petty considers a career highlight takes on new life when ‘Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers Live at the Fillmore’ is released on Friday, November 25. It will include recordings from the band’s 20-concert residency at the Fillmore in San Francisco between January 10 and February 7, 1997. They played dozens of songs during the run and recorded six of the shows. Signature moments included a handful of guest appearances from the likes of Roger McGuinn, Bo Diddley, and John Lee Hooker, plus dozens of covers, including Bob Dylan’s “Knockin’ On Heaven’s Door” and “Time is On My Side.” of the Rolling Stones. .”

– Rapper Rakim will take fans back to the golden age of hip-hop on Monday as he looks back on his “Paid in Full” album during a live pay-per-view concert from New York’s Sony Hall on the Iconn Live app. Rakim is the latest artist to sign up for the series, a roster that includes Ja Rule, Big Daddy Kane and Raekwon. Released in 1987, “Paid in Full” featured Rakim and Eric B. performing “Eric B. Is President”, “I Know You Got Soul” and “I Ain’t No Joke”.

– Josh Groban shows the world how he can fill New York’s famous 6,000-seat Radio City Music Hall with “Great Performances: Josh Groban’s Great Big Radio City Show” on PBS Friday, Nov. 25. Recorded in April 2022, it is billed as “Groban’s love letter to New York”. Joined by a full orchestra, he will perform his signature hits, including “You Raise Me Up,” as well as musical theater favorites “The Impossible Dream” and “Bring Him Home.” He is also joined on stage by pop legend Cyndi Lauper, Broadway star Denée Benton and ballet dancer Tiler Peck.

AP entertainment writer Mark Kennedy

— Risky shows at Chippendale men’s strip clubs have nothing to do with the behind-the-scenes melodrama created by company founder Somen “Steve” Banerjee. The events, so steeped in greed and crime that they’ve been chronicled in movies, miniseries and documentaries, get another look in Hulu’s “Welcome to Chippendales.” Kumail Nanjiani leads the cast which includes Murray Bartlett, Juliette Lewis and Annaleigh Ashford in the series which debuts with two episodes on Tuesday.

– Fans of “Pitch Perfect” movies in general and Adam Devine’s Bumper in particular are in luck. In Peacock’s ‘Pitch Perfect: Bumper in Berlin’, the singer jumps at the chance to become a star in Germany with the help of Pieter Krämer’s Flula (from ‘Pitch Perfect 2’). Sarah Hyland, Devine’s teammate during the “modern family” era, is also on board. The series will be released in full Wednesday on Peacock, with NBC viewers getting a taste of it when the first episode airs November 28.

“It’s almost criminal how much people love crime dramas. But because they do, and because franchises are a solid bet, here’s “Criminal Minds: Evolution” on Paramount+. Joe Mantegna, AJ Cook, Kirsten Vangsness and Aisha Tyler are among those reprising their original “Criminal Minds” roles in the spinoff. The mission of the FBI’s elite criminal profilers: track down a network of serial killers formed during the pandemic. The series debuts with two episodes on Thursday as the Thanksgiving hunter.

— Lynn Elber, AP Television Writer

“Look, you’re gonna need a way to get the stuffing out of here after this Thanksgiving. So why not organize an international dance party with friends from all over the world? Ubisoft’s “Just Dance 2023” promises a new online mode that will let you lose weight with up to five other friends. This year’s release features the usual mix of current hitmakers like BTS, Dua Lipa, Harry Styles, and Doja Cat. There’s something for the geezers, too: The party didn’t begin until Grandpa showed his steps to The Trammps’ “Disco Inferno.” It is available Tuesday on Nintendo Switch, PlayStation 5 and Xbox X/S.

– We all grew up hearing about Old West outlaws like Jesse James and Billy the Kid, but somehow the storytellers left out the real bad guys: vampires. Focus Entertainment and Polish studio Flying Wild Hog aim to correct this omission with “Evil West”. The varmints here are faster, meaner, and thirstier than any gunslinger you’d expect to encounter in a dusty saloon. Luckily, the heroes’ weapons – like a flamethrower and an electrified gauntlet – are more powerful than your standard six-shot. Tuesday, “Evil West” arrives on PlayStation 5, PlayStation 4, Xbox X / S, Xbox One and PC.

Find AP’s entertainment coverage here: https://apnews.com/apf-entertainment.


[ad_2]
Source link

]]>
IDA Member Spotlight: Miroslava Gonzalez Coronado https://ghostsofabughraib.org/ida-member-spotlight-miroslava-gonzalez-coronado/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 23:58:38 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/ida-member-spotlight-miroslava-gonzalez-coronado/ [ad_1] Miroslava is an indigenous Mexican-American mother and storyteller on a journey to claim her indigeneity. Throughout his life, Miros’ insatiable curiosity was nurtured by the wealth of oral culture and traditions handed down by his ancestors. As such, she has always been a storyteller with a desire to share stories that reflect her cultural […]]]>

[ad_1]

Miroslava is an indigenous Mexican-American mother and storyteller on a journey to claim her indigeneity. Throughout his life, Miros’ insatiable curiosity was nurtured by the wealth of oral culture and traditions handed down by his ancestors. As such, she has always been a storyteller with a desire to share stories that reflect her cultural richness, a point of view integral to the world and our humanity, though often vastly underrepresented.

Miros began her journey as an emerging filmmaker with her first project, The Bears On Pine Ridge (Co-Producer and Executive Producer). This award-winning documentary was honored by Vision Maker Media and is being developed into a one-hour feature film that will air on PBS in the US and Latin America this spring. Miros started as a volunteer in 2020 and quickly became a driving force as the project’s producer. His efforts helped bring this short film project to dozens of festivals and screenings, with the goal of raising awareness about the mental health crisis of Indigenous youth. Miros also helped turn the TBOPR project into a feature film, which is set to air on public television early next year.

IDA: Tell us about yourself. What is your profession (or passion) and why did you choose a career in documentary cinema?

Miroslava González Coronado: I’ve been a storyteller all my life and love passing on oral traditions. As the mother of a curious 11-year-old, at the height of the pandemic, I searched for ways to reconnect our family and my ancestral lands across the country. I longed to become more grounded and it became even more important to document this journey to reclaim our cultural truth and better understand where we came from to better assess where we are going. As COVID cases initially dwindled, a friend I was mobilizing our community with suggested I help out Noel Bass, director of The Bears On Pine Ridge. While I had no formal experience working on films, I jumped straight into problem solving. I helped Noel with our film festival strategy, impact campaign and writing a grant that was selected by Vision Maker Media whose mission is to engage and empower native people to share stories. Documentary cinema has not only become a vehicle to perpetuate the oral traditions I grew up with, but also a means of healing by amplifying the stories of traditionally underrepresented communities. I strongly believe that everyone has an important story to tell and the more stories we share the better we can understand each other and discover that we have more in common than we thought.

IDA: Tell us a bit about the bears of Pine Ridge.

CMG: The Pine Ridge Indian Reservation (in South Dakota) has declared three separate states of emergency due to youth suicide rates reaching the highest levels in the nation. The Bears on Pine Ridge amplifies the voices of two respected elders who lead the Oglala Sioux Tribe’s only suicide prevention team, while mentoring a group of teenage suicide survivors to find their voices, encouraging them to bring hope and awareness to the reserve. Many large suicide and mental health awareness organizations do not have access to booking. Data is very difficult to collect in booking communities, especially when internal organizations cannot continue due to lack of funding. In July 2018, the Reclaiming Native Truth (RNT) project was released. This was a two-year, $3.3 million public opinion research and strategy-building initiative by IllumiNative. Its findings, released in July 2018, resulted in comprehensive data and knowledge about the challenges and opportunities Native Americans face in educating Americans and changing public perceptions. The report found that “invisibility is the modern form of prejudice against Native Americans…The majority of Americans know little or nothing about Native Americans…Many Americans don’t know how many Native Americans still exist,” according to the RNT Project (https://rnt.firstnations.org/research/). The study also found that 78% of Americans want to know more about Native American culture. In other words, the public has a lot to learn. Very few are sufficiently aware of reservations issues to be able to engage in human rights efforts.

IDA: How did working on The Bears on Pine Ridge change your trajectory as a producer and filmmaker?

CMG: TBOPR brings unprecedented access to the youth suicide crisis happening in the isolated community of Pine Ridge, a community that most Americans don’t even know exists. SYW will give viewers insight into not just a Native American Mexican tribe that, like many indigenous peoples, forged the founding of the Greater Southwest. During research for both projects, I found that access to contemporary information is sorely lacking. We were often sent to the History section of the library and mostly found secular information when looking for stories from today to explore. Being an integral part of these films has not only shown me why it is essential not only to share the important stories around us, but also to support the female directors of BIPOC who have the ability to present stories from a different angle than we are used. movies through.

IDA: What are you working on at the moment?

CMG: Strong Yaqui Women documents my journey to reclaim my cultural truth, my indigenous Mexican roots. My great-grandmother was Yoemi (Yaqui) from the Sonoran Desert. She was widowed after her husband was killed for his land and she fled to save her four children, one of them being my grandmother who also overcame many obstacles just like my mom who is an immigrant and raised four children as a single mother. As a mother myself, I look forward to sharing with my son and my nieces that we come from a long line of resilient matriarchs who have sacrificed so much to enable us to thrive. This project pays tribute to these extraordinary women, my roots and future generations of changemakers. We hope to create a space where young girls can be inspired as they see themselves through the strong Indigenous women we will feature like: Yaqui Stanford graduate Leannette Galaz, who advocates for affordable housing in Montana; Selina Martinez, a young Yaqui-Xicana architect and professor at Arizona State University, uses high-tech gadgets to create 3D renderings of important Yaqui buildings and structures that lie in ruins. An important part of the documentary was sharing our origins with my cousin Priscila who honors the sacrifices of her immigrant parents and our ancestors by becoming the first president of the Latina Harvard Law Review. We will also seek to shed light on the internalized racism, colorism, anti-black and anti-indigenous sentiments that recent news has elucidated run deep in many indigenous Latinos. The parents involved in the project are from the Pascua Yaqui Tribe and my mentor from the Rosebud Sioux Tribe who has more than four decades of championing Indigenous representation in the film industry, Mr. Sonny Skyhawk. Various members and groups within my Yaqui community, including the Southern California Yaquis and the Yaqui Pride Project, have also pledged to participate.

IDA: Any final thoughts you would like to share with our members?

CMG: The 2020 UCLA Hollywood Diversity Report found that the demographics of film writers are 89% white, 5.2% black, 3.0% Asian, 0.7% Latino and directors are 84% white, 5 .5% black, 3.4% Asian, 2.7% Latino. USC’s Annenberg Inclusion Report 2021 reviewed 126 movies and 180 series produced by Netflix in 2018 and 2019, showed vast improvement in gender and racial equality with most minorities except of Latinos, as only 2.6% of all stories had a Latinx lead or co-lead, and similar low numbers behind the camera. Mexican-Americans make up 12% of the US population and nearly 70% of all Latinos in America. Movies and TV have a huge impact on the narrative, perception and reputation of our community – it seems the onus is on documentary makers to share stories that better represent change makers, individuals, families and underrepresented communities – stories told in a way that shows how it is a constitutional part of our nation’s history that aspires to “e pluribus unum”, so that together we can deliberate on our past and our present towards a fairer way forward.

Please check Miroslava’s website here!

[ad_2]
Source link

]]>
A sold-out screening for the documentary Magna Grecia by Cotsis and Genimahaliotis https://ghostsofabughraib.org/a-sold-out-screening-for-the-documentary-magna-grecia-by-cotsis-and-genimahaliotis/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 02:51:04 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/a-sold-out-screening-for-the-documentary-magna-grecia-by-cotsis-and-genimahaliotis/ [ad_1] The screening of the documentary film Magna Grecia: The Greco of Calabria by Greek-Australian producer Billy Cotsis, took place last Sunday at Sydney’s Little Italy on Norton Street, Leichhardt. The sold-out event was co-hosted by the Antigone Chapter of AHEPA NSW Inc and the Australian Association of Hellenic Educators. Australians from diverse backgrounds have […]]]>

[ad_1]

The screening of the documentary film Magna Grecia: The Greco of Calabria by Greek-Australian producer Billy Cotsis, took place last Sunday at Sydney’s Little Italy on Norton Street, Leichhardt.

The sold-out event was co-hosted by the Antigone Chapter of AHEPA NSW Inc and the Australian Association of Hellenic Educators.

Australians from diverse backgrounds have answered the call to support the promotion of Calabria’s Hellenic dialect, Greko, a dialect that has been spoken continuously for nearly 2,800 years.

A performance of traditional Pontian music by Kostas Papoulidis at the lyra and Peter Tsenkas at the daoulikicked the event, MC’d by Themis Kallos, executive producer of the Greek program on SBS Radio, who highlighted the importance of multilingualism and knowledge of the Hellenic language in modern society.

“What Greco speakers in Calabria are looking for is support, recognition for their efforts to keep the Greco tradition alive,” Billy Cotsis told the audience. “With our documentary, we are helping their efforts.”

The key theme for the event was given by the Consul General of Greece in Sydney Ioannis Mallikourtis in his brief speech.

“Our concern is that the Hellenic language continues to be spoken in Australia. As Greco speakers have been successful for 2,800 years, we are able to do that as well,” he said.

The 53-minute film is the result of visits by Cotsis and cinematographer Basil Gennimahaliotis to Greek-speaking villages in Calabria between 2002 and 2016.

Greco, English, Modern Hellenic and Modern Italian are all spoken throughout the film, a multilingualism reflecting the situation in Calabria.

The screening of the film was followed by a discussion moderated by the young Calabrian-Sicilian Australian, Belinda Fiori.

The Q&A session included Cotsis, Gennimahalitois and historian Dr Panayiotis Diamadis, who answered a stream of questions from the audience.

AHEPA NSW INC Chairman Bill Skandalakis also delivered a short speech, highlighting the organization’s pride in being a sponsor of the film, as part of AHEPA NSW INC’s efforts in support of Hellenic education .

Finally, the President of the Antigone Chapter, Mrs. Charoulla Themistocelous, added that “a number of members of our chapter are also members of the Association of Australian Hellenic Educators. In other words, involved in Hellenic education in Sydney. That is why we had the honor and the duty to broadcast this documentary, in turn, the other documentaries made by Billy Cotsis on the Hellenic dialects of Calabria and Puglia. These films contain important lessons for Australian Hellenism”.

Additional screening dates due to demand will be announced.

[ad_2]
Source link

]]>
How Maya Deren became the symbol and champion of American experimental film https://ghostsofabughraib.org/how-maya-deren-became-the-symbol-and-champion-of-american-experimental-film/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 11:03:45 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/how-maya-deren-became-the-symbol-and-champion-of-american-experimental-film/ [ad_1] The hectic distortions and special effects created by Hammid give the film its mind-blowing intensity, while Deren’s presence gives it its allure and personality. (For the purposes of the film’s credits, Deren took the name Maya, and kept it, on and off screen.) She certainly didn’t invent experimental cinema, nor bring it to the […]]]>

[ad_1]

The hectic distortions and special effects created by Hammid give the film its mind-blowing intensity, while Deren’s presence gives it its allure and personality. (For the purposes of the film’s credits, Deren took the name Maya, and kept it, on and off screen.) She certainly didn’t invent experimental cinema, nor bring it to the United States. United, but, with this silent short, Deren became Orson Welles of the genre, realizing his own original ideas through successful collaboration with an experienced cinematographer (as Welles did with Gregg Toland) and putting those ideas showcased through on-screen star power. She became the name of avant-garde cinema by becoming its face: a still image of her, at a window of “Meshes”, is, to this day, the first emblematic image of American experimental cinema, the synecdoche at single image for the entire cinema. Category. Yet unlike Welles, who made his film fame when he was hired by a studio that later released his film, and when critics recognized his originality, Deren created “Meshes” in the absence of executives. institutional, organizational, even intellectual – which she took it upon herself to build as well.

In 1943, Hammid was hired by the Federal Office of War Information in New York to make documentaries, Durant writes, that supported the war effort. The couple moved from California to Greenwich Village, renting a fifth-floor walk-up apartment at 61 Morton Street (where Deren lived for the rest of his life). Deren was quickly introduced to high artistic circles through her work as a portrait photographer for magazines such as vogue and vanity lounge. She makes a film with Marcel Duchamp (which she will never complete), and, in the summer of 1944, she makes another film of phantasmagorical imagination, “At Land”. Where “Meshes” ends with Deren as a bloodied corpse, “At Land” begins with his body washed up on a beach – alive, in fact. Deren pulls herself up onto a large piece of driftwood and, peering over its edge, finds herself in a banquet hall, at a long dinner table, where she crawls on the tablecloth between the cheerful, unfazed guests. The film also contains elements of erotic fantasy, such as when she is on a walk with a man who turns out to be four different people (including Hammid and composer John Cage), she follows Hammid to a cabin and instead finds another man in a bed. , and – back on the beach – she comes across two women playing chess and happily strokes a player’s head. In “At Land”, Deren acts more visibly, with a new athletic choreographic element. Her performance is full of connotations from other performers: her modest oblique gazes evoke Katharine Hepburn; and, when she zealously pursues her physical tasks, she brings to mind Bette Davis. (While filming on the beach in Amagansett, Deren bumped into Anaïs Nin, and they quickly became friends.)

Deren, whose coterie had grown to include many members of downtown’s artistic beau monde, became a major socialite in bohemian circles, turning the couple’s apartment into a center for parties and gatherings, and her relationships have proven to be galvanic. Durant quotes Nin’s diary of the strength Deren wielded among the village culturati: “We are subject to his will, to his strong personality, but at the same time we don’t entirely trust or love him. We recognize his talent. We speak of rebellion, of constraint, of tyranny, but we bow before our projects, we make sacrifices. Nin cites “the power of her personality” and notes “her determined voice, the assertiveness and sensuality of her peasant body, her dancing, her percussion; everything haunted us. We spent a lot of time talking about her. In a frenzy of creation and organization, Deren seemingly ordered the world around him, at least for one crucial moment, to fit into a template of his own design.

With no existing theater for the types of films she made, she held private home screenings and eventually a downtown art gallery. In April 1945 she made another film, ‘A Study in Choreography for Camera’, featuring the dancer Talley Beatty, also a Dunham alumnus, and it attracted attention in the dance world. “Strangers and vague acquaintances stopped her on the street to ask how they could see her films,” Durant wrote. Later that year, she sought to distribute her films, contacting museums and universities, writing a sales pamphlet titled “Film as an Independent Art Form” and taking out a print advertisement in a sophisticated literature and literature magazine. named art See.

Love at first sight in this primordial soup of Deren’s avant-garde celebrity came on February 18, 1946. She had rented the Provincetown Playhouse, a West Village theater, for a screening of her films that evening and, like the Durant details, she promoted the hell out of him. She edited a brochure with blurbs from notables (including Nin) and a short essay by her, lined the village with handmade flyers, and issued personal invitations to leading critics. “The party sold out in minutes, leaving hundreds of people on the streets teeming with frustration,” Durant wrote. “Deren’s films were, for weeks, the talking point of the Village, even those who were turned down had an opinion on what was seen that night.”

Among the audience at the Provincetown Playhouse was a twenty-four-year-old Austrian Jewish immigrant named Amos Vogel, who said the event made him recognize “a new kind of talent” in film, “an individual expressing an inner need very deep”. .” The following year, Vogel and his wife, Marcia, founded a film company called Cinema 16, which launched its screenings at the same cinema and, in the 1950s and early 1960s, was New York’s favorite hangout. York for non-Hollywood, independent, experimental and international films. (Vogel was also one of the founders of the New York Film Festival, which was launched in 1963.)

Deren’s accomplishments in the field of experimental cinema were integrated into the larger phenomenon of World War II as a particularly powerful real-time engine for artistic transformation in the United States, from Abstract Expressionism conquering the galleries of art to the rise of bebop in jazz clubs. Abstraction, complexity and vehemence came to the fore during the war and just after its end, a time when realities were so appalling they were almost unrepresentable, when much of the worst was still unknown but looming. in presentiments, fantasies, hints, and rumors, and when, in a short and terrifying time, the Holocaust became known and nuclear war became a reality.

In 1945, Deren shot another silent short, “Ritual in Transfigured Time”, the last of her films, as Durant notes, in which she appeared. (She finished it after the premiere of the 1946 screenings at the Provincetown Playhouse; it premiered June 1, 1946, and she showed it throughout the year, to heartwarming success.) The film centers on dancer Rita Christiani, a former member of Dunham’s dance company, whom Deren, in his script plan, considered, for film purposes, to be “the same person” as herself. The film begins with Deren carrying a skein of yarn and, with forced cheerfulness, recruiting Christiani for his winding (as Nin looms in the background). Deren’s performance is archaic, hectic, more contrived than stylized – her efforts to perform are overdone and flat, as if trying and failing to recover.

However, “Ritual” contains a nearly four-minute sequence of ingeniously crafted and thrilling stylization, which I consider to be the most compelling scene she has ever filmed – and it is the one in which she does not appear. It’s a party scene, shot in his own apartment, featuring the literati and celebrities around him (including Howard Moss, then poetry editor of the new yorker); it is also Deren’s modern film adaptation of Antoine Watteau’s painting “The French Comedians”, from around 1720, which she had seen at the Met. The scene, featuring around 30 people and centering on Christiani’s efforts to connect with the other guests, is filmed in slow motion; the framings underscore the deep layering of revelers’ comings and goings, and Deren evokes their cold conviviality with finely insightful and precisely imaginative staging. (She told them, “When you greet each other, greet with your palm up.”) As Durant observes, “In Deren’s editing, shots and gestures are repeated in rhythm, elevating the casual movements in the realm of choreography.

[ad_2]
Source link

]]>
Review: Happy Pills – Cineuropa https://ghostsofabughraib.org/review-happy-pills-cineuropa/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 13:22:42 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/review-happy-pills-cineuropa/ [ad_1] 11/15/2022 – The documentary by Arnaud Robert and Paolo Woods is a journey into the world of pharmacy and the globalized obligation to be happy thanks to a pill What is happiness? This question that religion and philosophy have asked themselves over the centuries has evolved, in modern times, into “can happiness come in […]]]>

[ad_1]

– The documentary by Arnaud Robert and Paolo Woods is a journey into the world of pharmacy and the globalized obligation to be happy thanks to a pill

What is happiness? This question that religion and philosophy have asked themselves over the centuries has evolved, in modern times, into “can happiness come in a pill? to which the science of Big Pharma offers an immediate, direct and devastating answer, and to which governments have only weakly contested, while the media makes happiness a duty rather than a right. And it is this question that is at the root of Happiness Pills, a documentary by the Swiss director Arnaud-Robert – who already has three other documentaries to his credit – and Paul’s wood – a Dutch-Canadian photographer devoted to investigative journalism – which had its world premiere at the Festival dei Popoli in Florence.

(The article continues below – Commercial information)

In order to deepen the globalized obligation to be happy, Happiness Pills embarks on a journey through 6 different countries, bringing together stories that give context to the original question. The film opens in the slums of Bombay, where young bodybuilders take steroids to compete. But it soon moves to other continents, starting with our home in Switzerland, one of the three ‘happiest’ countries in the world, where one in four people will seek treatment for depression at least once in his life. Here we meet patrick who uses sertraline and quetiapine to combat his suicidal tendencies and is endlessly admitted and discharged from a mental hospital, where other drugs are used to stabilize his incurable sadness and make his reality bearable. The pharmaceuticals that killed millions in the West have now found their way to the world’s poorest countries: Alzouma is a young Nigerian who takes Tramadol – a powerful painkiller sold on the street, which has replaced the traditional infusion of tree bark – in order to work without getting tired the countless daily hours that are required of him. In Massachusetts, meanwhile, a teenager To add turns to Adderall and Ritalin to treat his attention deficit disorder (a diagnosis received by 10% of young people in the United States), because his mother does not want his school work to be as horrible as his uncle Jay.

This journey in search of happiness continues via Husbandsa young man from Tel Aviv, who wants to fully live his homosexuality without fearing AIDS, and whose ritual, every morning, is to take pre-exposure prophylaxis (Preparation) pills. For him, Preparation is as close to “peace of mind” as possible, even if the doctor explains that the good old condom is still the best line of defense. Another medicine for happiness, or rather for freedom, is “the pill”, par excellence: the contraceptive. Our documentary follows Yurica, a young woman from the Peruvian Amazon, who injects herself with contraceptives so as not to fall pregnant again while raising her four children alone, in a country where the (dangerous) concept of the “natural method” still dominates, and where, traditionally, , men are not held responsible for children. Our pharmaceutical tour ends with a French intellectual called Louis, who suffers from pancreatic cancer, opts for assisted suicide in Switzerland and is then injected with Pentobarbital. This is an example of someone who has lived a happy life and would prefer an equally serene and conscious end.

Adopting a traditional approach, and at the edge of a classic investigation, the camera lens of Robert and Woods scans the faces of the protagonists of these stories, in search of a sign explaining their abuse of anxiolytics, antidepressants, sleeping pills and opioids, which heal human wounds. It’s a non-judgmental cross-sectional journey, all too aware that we’re all looking for chemical answers to an existential question. Their brief comments – rather than actual sentences – express their concern for a world dominated by the fear of failure and the pressure to succeed, where adolescence is seen as a disease, and where looking happy and actually being happy does not are one and the same.

Happiness Pills is produced by the Swiss company Intermezzo Films in co-production with the Cellule Films Documentaires de la RTS, SSR-SRG and ARTE GEIE International sales are entrusted to Lightdox.

(The article continues below – Commercial information)

(Translated from Italian)

[ad_2]
Source link

]]>