Latest News: Library seeks candidates for the 2022 Archives, History and Heritage Advanced Internship Program

The Library of Congress is seeking applicants for its upcoming Advanced Internship Program in Archives, History, and Heritage, which will run from September 12 — November 18, 2022. This 10-week paid internship is open to junior and senior undergraduate students, graduate and doctoral students interested in learning and conducting research in the world’s largest library.

The 2022 internship program will be a hybrid format that includes on-site and remote projects, allowing interns from near and far to participate. The deadline to apply is Monday April 25, 2022.

The internship program provides the next generation of archivists and diverse knowledge workers with invaluable opportunities to analyze, organize, and interpret collections or programs that help share an inclusive story of the American experience. Internships and projects will increase visibility and promote accessibility to library resources that more fully represent the rich cultural and creative heritage of the United States.

The program targets historically underrepresented Black, Indigenous, and communities of color in the United States and in the Library’s collections, i.e. enrolled students or recent graduates of institutions of higher education serving minorities, such as institutions serving Alaska Natives and Native Hawaiians, American Indians Tribal-controlled colleges and universities, institutions serving Asian and Native American Pacific Islanders, institutions serving Hispanics, historically black colleges and universities, Native American-serving, non-tribal, and predominantly black institutions.

The 2022 Archives, History and Heritage Advanced Internship Program is supported by an investment from the Mellon Foundation through the multi-year Of the People: Widening the Path initiative to connect more deeply with Black, Natives, Hispanics or Latinos, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. communities by expanding collections, using technology to enable storytelling, and providing more internship and scholarship opportunities. Of the People: Widening the Path creates new opportunities for more people to engage with the library, allowing the library to share a more inclusive American story. The internship program is also funded in part by Craig and Diane Welburn, members of the library’s Madison Council.

The Library plans to hire approximately 14 interns to complete six on site and five remote projects. All onsite projects will be conducted entirely on the library’s Capitol Hill campus; all remote projects will be completed entirely offsite. Each intern will be responsible for working on a project as their primary responsibility, alongside other assignments that will introduce them to a range of library activities.

On-site projects

1) Discover the literary heritage of Africa in America (Africa and Middle East Division)

Project description: The project raises awareness of the complex intellectual heritage of African Americans, the retention of Africanisms in America, and the critical role of African writing in influencing African American identity. Interns will explore relevant curricula and items scattered throughout the library to discover and interpret the history of African writing as written by Africans, enslaved Africans, and African Americans.

2) Provide access to NAACP archives (Manuscripts Division)

Project description: This project will provide the opportunity to learn and apply archival principles of arrangement and description and to refine skills in analyzing the archives of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), the largest and most consulted collection in the Manuscripts Division.

3) Research, Reference and Access – NAACP Records (Manuscripts Division)

Project description: Interns will research the collection of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) Library Folders create deliverables describing the layout of the collection and promote its accessibility.

4) The American Public Broadcasting Archive Online Preservation Project (National Audiovisual Conservation Center)

Project description: The intern will curate one or more new collections from the American Archive of Public Broadcasting website that relate to public broadcasting coverage of the history and cultures of Black, Hispanic, Indigenous, or historically underrepresented communities. The intern will also compile research to help archival staff target the preservation of additional programs relevant to the histories and cultures of these communities.

5) Visual Literacy: Enhanced critical analysis and subject indexing for photographs of African Americans and Japanese Americans (Division of Prints and Photographs)

Project description: Interns will work with catalogers to develop subject indexing skills resulting in improved description of online collections, including portraits of African-American actors, artists, authors, and musicians taken by Carl Van Vechten during the Harlem Renaissance and documentary photographs of Japanese American incarceration during World War II.

6) Development of youth and family programs (Office of Informal Learning)

Description of the project: The intern learn and observe the experiences of family visitors in the Young Readers’ Center program lab, then develop two prototype “quests” and test them in the centre. The project focuses on adapting various library materials for young people and promoting accessibility for this particular audience.

Remote projects

1) Discover the literary heritage of Africa in America (Africa and Middle East Division)

Project description: The project raises awareness of the complex intellectual heritage of African Americans, the retention of Africanisms in America, and the critical role of African writing in influencing African American identity. Interns will explore relevant curricula and items scattered throughout the library to discover and interpret the history of African writing as written by Africans, enslaved Africans, and African Americans.

2) Theodore Roosevelt and African Americans (Manuscripts Division)

Project description: Using Theodore Roosevelt Papers Online, the intern will formulate a methodology for discovering African American voices in the Roosevelt papers, create a list of relevant documents discovered, and analyze these primary sources to understand how African Americans interacted and thought about Theodore Roosevelt.

3) The U.S. Public Broadcasting Archive Online Preservation Project (National Audiovisual Conservation Center)

Project description: The intern will curate one or more new collections from the American Archive of Public Broadcasting website that relate to public broadcasting coverage of the history and cultures of Black, Hispanic, Indigenous, or historically underrepresented communities. The intern will also compile research to help archival staff target the preservation of additional programs relevant to the histories and cultures of these communities.22-027

4) Inventory of Diverse Collection Highlights (Communications Office)

Project description: The purpose of this project is to identify and inventory a large number of collection items (from 200 to 1,000) that are particularly noteworthy for reasons that will capture the imagination of a wide audience with varied interests.

5) Support Culturally Relevant Pedagogy with Library of Congress Digital Collections (Professional Learning and Awareness Initiatives)

Project description: The intern will collaborate with library staff and members of the Teaching with Primary Sources (TPS) consortium to identify K-12 classroom materials and strategies that use library digitized resources to effectively support culturally relevant and other pedagogies specifically developed to serve African American students and other students of color. .

Project descriptions and skills required for onsite projects can be found at: https://www.loc.gov/item/internships/archives-history-and-heritage-advanced-internship-program-onsite-internship- 2022/

Project descriptions and skills required for remote projects can be found at: https://www.loc.gov/item/internships/archives-history-and-heritage-advanced-internship-program-remote-internship- 2022/.

The Library of Congress is an equal opportunity employer. Women, minorities and people with disabilities who meet the eligibility requirements are strongly encouraged to apply. Questions about the program or projects can be sent to [email protected].

The Library of Congress is the largest library in the world, providing access to the creative archives of the United States – and many documents from around the world – both onsite and online. It is the main research arm of the US Congress and the seat of the US Copyright Office. Explore the collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit to loc.gov; access the official US Federal Legislative Information website at congress.gov; and save the author’s creative works to copyright.gov.


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