feature films – Ghosts Of Abu Ghraib http://ghostsofabughraib.org/ Sat, 19 Mar 2022 20:04:20 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-120x120.jpg feature films – Ghosts Of Abu Ghraib http://ghostsofabughraib.org/ 32 32 These Philippines will bring Filipino cinema to the world https://ghostsofabughraib.org/these-philippines-will-bring-filipino-cinema-to-the-world/ Sat, 19 Mar 2022 17:38:53 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/these-philippines-will-bring-filipino-cinema-to-the-world/ [ad_1] The president of the FDCP, Liza Diño, with Armi Cacanindin during the evening of the ambassadors of the cinema on February 27 at the MET. Fact — the Philippine film industry has always been a female-dominated industry. Filipino cinema has always carried the indelible mark of the Filipino from the beginning. Case in point […]]]>

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The president of the FDCP, Liza Diño, with Armi Cacanindin during the evening of the ambassadors of the cinema on February 27 at the MET.

Fact — the Philippine film industry has always been a female-dominated industry. Filipino cinema has always carried the indelible mark of the Filipino from the beginning.

Case in point – Atang dela Rama, the first national female artist who also starred in the first Filipino film “Dalagang Bukid”. Key positions in the industry have always been held by women – Dona Sisang led LVN Pictures to its peak while Dona Nene ran rival production company Sampaguita Pictures. His daughter Marichu Vera-Perez Maceda, affectionately known as Manay Ichu, also made significant contributions to the film industry, including her role in organizing Mowelfund and lobbying for the founding of a film agency. which later became the Film Development Council of the Philippines.

The Philippines has maintained its strong presence in modern times through the likes of “Mother” movie outfit matriarchs Lily Monteverde and Armida Siguion-Reyna; Charo Santos-Concio, respected actress and film/television executive; and directors Laurice Guillen, Olivia Lamasan and Marilou Diaz-Abaya.

While the director provides the creative vision for a film and has complete artistic control over the production, it is the producer who turns those visions into reality. Beyond funding roles, they are mostly decision makers on what projects to launch, where to get funding, who to hire for creative positions like writers and directors, and how to manage production logistics from pre-production through to production. ‘at the end. to effective and efficient distribution.

Through more than a century of Filipino cinema, the Filipino has led the industry through ups and downs, through tough times and golden days. She has always been its driving force and fervent advocate. Its quiet strength carried the industry through a hundred years and now film remains an important medium, not only for showing and portraying culture, but also for fostering ideas.

Now, more than ever, more Filipino women are producing, filming and starring in stories featuring leading female characters in prominent roles. There is cause for rejoicing because this phenomenon in itself, this zeitgeist, is already a bearer of hope. The fact that women are in decision-making positions moves us up several notches on the equity scale.

Filipino women are not damsels in distress who need a knight in shining armor. As GD Anderson says, “Feminism isn’t about making women strong. Women are already strong. It’s about changing the way the world views that strength.” The Filipina is already strong and she has something to say. We need to give her an avenue where she can be heard.

In celebration of Women’s Month in March, allow me to highlight some of the country’s established and emerging Filipino filmmakers who are blazing new trails for the Filipino film industry on the local and international stages.

Bianca Balbuena, in addition to being an accomplished producer, is also a screenwriter and CEO of Epicmedia Productions Inc. which brought us the smash hits “That Thing Called Tadhana” and “Fan Girl”; and internationally acclaimed films such as the Venice Film Festival Lion of the Future “Engkwentro” by Pepe Diokno and the Berlinale’s Silver Bear “A Lullaby To The Sorrowful Mystery” (Hele sa Hiwagang Hapis) by Lav Diaz. She is the first producer to receive the Camera Obscura Excellence Award.

His filmography includes co-production projects and film mentorship opportunities with countries around the world. In 2018, she was named Producer of the Year by the Busan Asian Film Commissions Network and the youngest winner of the Asia Pacific Screen Awards FIAPF for her outstanding contribution to cinema in Asia-Pacific.

Armi Rae Cacanindin is head of long-form productions at Globe Studios. She is the producer of the recent Ambassadors’ Night 2022 A-Lister film “Kun Maupay man it Panahon” by Carlo Francisco Manatad which won the Youth Jury Prize at the Locarno Film Festival last year; and the creative documentary “Aswang” directed by Alyx Arumpac which gained international acclaim, including an Oscar nomination for Best Documentary. “Aswang” also made history as the first documentary to receive Best Picture at Famous and won the Camera Obscura Excellence Award, the FDCP’s highest honor.

Arleen Cuevas is an educator and co-founder of the production company Cinematografica, along with Raya Martin and Armi Cacanindin. She is currently a lecturer in production at the University of Breda in the Netherlands. His two films “Independencia” and “Manille” were part of the official selection of the 2009 Cannes Film Festival.

She co-produced Shireen Seno’s “Nervous Translation” which won the Netpac Award for Best Asian Film at the 2018 Rotterdam Film Festival. She has also had several projects with filmmakers Raya Martin and Adolf Alix Jr., some of which screened in various international film festivals. She has also co-produced international productions such as “The Amazing Truth about Queen Raquela” which won the Teddy Award for Best Film at the 2008 Berlin Film Festival and was executive producer of American director John Sayles’ film “Amigo” in 2011.

Monster Jimenez is the producer of “Leonor Will Never Die” which won the Sundance this year. Currently, she runs This Side Up, a content creation house that develops stories for brands and entertainment.

She is also a screenwriter, director and editor, with notable works such as “Big Time”, “Apocalypse Child” and “Respeto”.

Micah Tadena is Country Director of global media company 108 Media, with over five years of media experience. She has developed and produced feature films and short documentaries for organizations such as Netflix, VICE Media, Unesco, etc. “The Mango Bride”, a Palanca-winning novel by Marivi Soliven, is being adapted into a feature film by 108 Media.

Pamela Reyes is also a script consultant and filmmaker. With a decade of experience producing films, series and commercials, Pamela has produced a number of blockbuster films that have reached international heights, including “Birdshot”, the first Filipino film on Netflix and the entry official Philippines at the 2018 Oscars. Currently, Pamela produces selected film projects, local and international co-productions, through her Manila-based production boutique, Create Cinema Inc.

Patti Lapus’ work in online production includes the award-winning films “Midnight in a Perfect World” by Dodo Dayao; “Chedeng and Apple” by Fatrick Tabada and Rae Red; and “Tenement 66” also by Rae Red. She also produced “Nocebo” by Lorcan Finnegan, recipient of a grant from the FDCP and a co-production between the United Kingdom, Ireland and the United States.

She is a resident executive producer and head of production for Epicmedia. She is currently producing Dodo Dayao’s upcoming feature film “Dear Wormwood”. Patti is currently the interim president of the Inter-Guild Alliance, a community network of various groups from the film, television and advertising industries.

Finally, Gale Osorio was the producer of “It’s Raining Frogs Outside” (Ampangabagat Nin Talakba Ha Likol) by Maria Estela Paiso, the first film in the Sambal language in the entire history of the Berlinale. She was also the producer of the short film Babylon, the second Filipino film selected in the Berlinale Short Film Competition in 2018, and has participated in many other national and international film events.

She has also produced “Iskalawags” and “Lily”, and is currently developing Keith Deligero’s “Babylon” into a feature film, and Zurich Chan’s “Cangrejos”. In between film productions, she helps organize the annual Binisaya Film Festival in Cebu City, her way of helping the development of Filipino cinema in the regions.

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SIFF 2022 Returns to Theaters After Previous Years’ Canceled and Virtual Festivals https://ghostsofabughraib.org/siff-2022-returns-to-theaters-after-previous-years-canceled-and-virtual-festivals/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 21:39:38 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/siff-2022-returns-to-theaters-after-previous-years-canceled-and-virtual-festivals/ [ad_1] By Seattle Times Art Critic The Seattle International Film Festival, back in theaters after a canceled festival in 2020 and an all-virtual edition in 2021, will open April 14 with “Navalny,” a documentary about the attempted assassination of Russian dissident Alexei Navalny, directed by Daniel Roher. It will be screened at an opening gala […]]]>

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The Seattle International Film Festival, back in theaters after a canceled festival in 2020 and an all-virtual edition in 2021, will open April 14 with “Navalny,” a documentary about the attempted assassination of Russian dissident Alexei Navalny, directed by Daniel Roher. It will be screened at an opening gala at the Paramount Theater, followed by a party both in and out of the theater, where Ninth Avenue will be closed to make way for food trucks and a coffee shop in outdoors.

Taking place over 10 days (rather than its usual three and a half week duration before the pandemic), the festival will be a hybrid edition, although not all films will be available virtually. The films will be screened online on the SIFF channel, in the three SIFF cinemas (Egyptian, Uptown, SIFF Film Center) and at Pacific Place, Majestic Bay, Ark Lodge and Shoreline Community College. The closing party, which will take place on April 24, will take place at the Egyptian with an evening to follow at the MOHAI.

The festival will feature some 250 films from 80 countries. Other than ‘Navalny’, no titles were announced; SIFF says it will announce lineup details on March 30.

Passes and packages are currently on sale; prices are $650 ($525 SIFF members) for a full pass, $200 ($150) for a virtual pass only, $75 ($62) for a six-pack of individual tickets. Other packages and passes are available; see siff.net for more information.

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Miami Film Festival Nominates ‘Freda’ and ‘You Can Always Come Home’ – Deadline https://ghostsofabughraib.org/miami-film-festival-nominates-freda-and-you-can-always-come-home-deadline/ Sun, 13 Mar 2022 01:00:00 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/miami-film-festival-nominates-freda-and-you-can-always-come-home-deadline/ [ad_1] Two family dramas, the feature film Freda and short film You can always come home won top prizes at the 39th Miami Dade College’s Miami Film Festival. Presented in a hybrid format with indoor and virtual presentations, the 2022 Festival ran from March 4 until tomorrow. Making its US premiere at this year’s Festival, […]]]>

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Two family dramas, the feature film Freda and short film You can always come home won top prizes at the 39th Miami Dade College’s Miami Film Festival. Presented in a hybrid format with indoor and virtual presentations, the 2022 Festival ran from March 4 until tomorrow.

Making its US premiere at this year’s Festival, Freda, directed by Géssica Généus, won first prize for its first feature film. Located in Haiti, the $25,000 Knight MARIMBAS Prize, supported by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, is an international competition for new narrative feature films that best exemplify the richness and resonance for the future of movie theater.

The winning film was selected by jury members Damon D’Oliveria, April Dobbins and Rubén Peralta Rigaud. The jury said, “This film resonated with us all for its strong, female-centered narrative and outstanding performances by up-and-coming actors. We couldn’t stop thinking about this world and these characters, and enjoyed being immersed in a place we don’t often see on screen – portrayed so realistically, yet tenderly.

The jury also gave special recognition to actor Haztin Navarrete of The box and actress Mari Oliveira of Astonished saying, “for two magnetic performances we couldn’t take our eyes off.”

The Knight Made in MIA Film Award of $55,000, supported by the Knight Foundation, is given to three films that have a substantial portion of their content set in South Florida and that best utilize their story and theme for a universal resonance. They were evaluated by jury members Mollye Asher, Nicholas Griffin, Johann Zietsman and Keisha Rae Witherspoon, who won the Knight Made in MIA award for her 2020 short drama, J.

“You Can Always Come Home,” directed by Juan Luis Matos, won the top prize of $30,000. The jury said, “This is a film that radiates the joyful spirit of Miami in its embrace of family, community and place while embodying the universal sense of home.”

The second prize ($15,000) went to “In Beauty It Is Unfinished”, directed by Greko Sklavounos. The jury said: “This poetic offering is a magnificent fever dream that captures longing, fragments of memory and a poetic look at a Miami that is both familiar but also new. Made personal.

Third prize ($10,000) went to ‘Un Pequeño Corte’, directed by Marianna Serrano, whose jury said, “It’s a charming and powerful story that serves as a portrait of an independent spirit in a demanding world. conformity”.

The family drama you look like me, directed by Dina Amer, won the $10,000 Jordan Ressler First Feature Award. The honour, sponsored by the South Florida family of the late Jordan Ressler, goes to the best film directed by a filmmaker making their feature-length narrative debut.

The selection committee, made up of Estrella Araiza, Jonathan Cuartas and 2019 Jordan Ressler Award winner Alexandre Moratto, said in a statement, “We chose the film for its bold portrayal of fragmented identity and social inequality in through his masterful weaving of styles. Part intimate character study, part current affairs drama, part documentary, this fearless filmmaker, a former journalist who reported on the real events that inspired the film, takes a personal approach that is both serious and disturbing, moving and provocative. The Jordan Ressler First Feature Award goes to Dina Amer for you look like me.”

The drama Carajita, co-produced by Wooden Boat Productions (Dominican Republic) and Pucará Cine (Argentina), won the $10,000 HBO Ibero-American Feature Film Award, sponsored by WarnerMedia. The film, about class and race issues in Latin America and the Caribbean, was selected by jurors Carlos Aguilar, Leslie Cohen and Brandon Harris. The annual award is given to the best Hispanic American or Ibero-American narrative feature film, and is awarded to the lead producer or production company.

Set during the era of China’s Cultural Revolution, the war drama A second won the Rene Rodriguez Critics Award, selected by accredited film critics covering the Festival. The film, screened as a special presentation, is directed by Chinese filmmaker Zhang Yimou, a three-time Academy Award nominee for Best Foreign Language Film.

Felipe Perez Santiago, composer of Amalgam, won the Alacran Music in Film Award, sponsored by Alacran Studios. The award highlights the power of music and film and celebrates the role of the film composer. Art of Light (Composer) award winner Cristobal Tapia de Veer selected the winner.

The shorts category is dominated by the $10,000 WarnerMedia OneFifty Latino Short Film Award, judged by programmers from HBO and the Miami Film Festival, which awards $5,000 to the winner and $1,250 each to the four finalists. The top prize went to New York-based Puerto Rican filmmaker Ricardo Varona’s dramatic short ‘Hector’s Woman (La mujer de Héctor)’, with other awards going to ‘Chilly & Milly’, ‘It’s Not Her (No Es Ella )”, “For some horses (Por unos caballos)” and “The year of the radio (El Año del Radio)”.

Pakistani filmmaker Ali Sohail Jaura has won the $5,000 Miami International Short Film Prize, awarded by select members of the Miami Film Festival program committee, for his historical war drama “Murder Tongue,” which illuminates the one of the most brutal chapters in the history of Karachi, Pakistan. .

The $500 University of Miami Documentary Short Prize, judged by faculty members of the University of Miami’s Faculty of Communication, went to “The Originals,” directed by Cristina Costantini and Alfie Koetter, a ten-year retrospective through the eyes of their former owner. and her childhood friends on growing up in South Brooklyn. “Firelei Báez: An Open Horizon (or) The Stillness of a Wound”, directed by Souki Mehdaoui, received an honorable mention.

The Audience Award for Short Film went to the romantic comedy “Cariño”, directed by Fernanda Lamuño. The first runner-up was “Un Pequeño Corte”, directed by Mariana Serrano and the second runner-up was “Madame Pipi”, directed by Rachelle Salnave.

This year’s Best Poster award went to two outstanding images. Designed by Nate Biller of Jump Cut, the poster for the period drama Parsley evoked the style of 1930s Hollywood epics, according to the Festival’s selection jury, as it “subverts these traditions by prominently featuring black/Haitian Latin characters” to create a timely statement that is both “poignant and powerful” . Sander Brouwer’s work for the Chilean thriller Immersionspotlighting a man refusing to help a sinking boat moved the judges ‘tremendously’ with a reverse submergence in emotion, ‘a conflict of morals and paranoia’, which can prevent human beings from acting with compassion.

Former Knight Marimbas award winner Lorenz Metz edited the trailer for his own film, the film produced in Switzerland. soul of a beasta divisive romantic drama that was chosen for this year’s best trailer award by some members of the festival’s programming committee.

Back in 2022, Florida Cinemaslam Student Film Award of $1,000, judged by past Cinemaslam winners, with its cash prize for gay character study The Truth of a Thousand Nights, directed by Chris Molina. Other non-monetary prizes were awarded in five categories: Off-sidedirected by Emiliano Gioffre (best screenplay), Off-sidedirected by Emiliano Gioffre (best actor), One calldirected by Camila Marcano (Best Actress), Cut shortdirected by Charlie Andelman (Best Cinematography) and Symfaunicdirected by Erin Bergin and Darby Kate Snyder (Best Technical Achievement).

The winners of the Audience Award for Feature Film and the Documentary Award, determined by a vote of Festival audience members, will be announced after the end of the Festival.

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Cleveland International Film Festival announces films for Playhouse Square and streaming https://ghostsofabughraib.org/cleveland-international-film-festival-announces-films-for-playhouse-square-and-streaming/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 16:17:00 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/cleveland-international-film-festival-announces-films-for-playhouse-square-and-streaming/ [ad_1] The 46and The annual Cleveland International Film Festival (CIFF) kicks off in late March at Playhouse Square with 146 features and 182 shorts. After adapting the past two years with online streaming, this year will be a hybrid experience. “Just moving to Playhouse Square would make everything new, but on top of that, a […]]]>

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The 46and The annual Cleveland International Film Festival (CIFF) kicks off in late March at Playhouse Square with 146 features and 182 shorts. After adapting the past two years with online streaming, this year will be a hybrid experience.

“Just moving to Playhouse Square would make everything new, but on top of that, a pandemic and it gets quite interesting and complicated,” said Marcie Goodman, the festival’s executive director.

CIFF presents 11 days of in-person films from March 30 to April 9, followed by eight days of streaming via the CIFF Streams app from April 10 to 17.

“About 60% feature, and I think every short will be streaming,” Goodman said.

Two films with ties to Russia were pulled from the lineup ahead of Monday’s announcement due to the ongoing conflict in Ukraine.

The festival joined other arts and cultural organizations supporting Ukraine in deciding “not to screen at CIFF46 any films produced by companies based in Russia or funded in any way by the Russian Federation”, announced the festival in a press release.

“Erie Situation” is a documentary about toxic algae in Lake Erie.

Several CIFF feature films have ties to Ohio, such as “Erie Situation,” a documentary about toxic algae in the lake, and “Full Out: Inside Ohio Show Choir,” which follows groups of high school students in Solon, Strongsville, Garfield Heights and Hamilton, Ohio.

“Part of our mission is to bring the latest and greatest films from around the world to Cleveland. And of course that also means the latest and greatest films locally,” said Goodman.

The festival opens with “Peace by Chocolate,” based on the true story of a family who resettled in Canada after their chocolate factory was bombed in Syria. The closing film, “Linoleum,” is a sci-fi comedy-drama set in a fictional Ohio town and starring Jim Gaffigan as the host of a failing children’s show.

Other offerings include “We Feed People,” a Ron Howard-directed documentary about celebrity chef José Andrés and his nonprofit that provides food to communities after disasters, and “Klondike,” a timely drama about a future family living the war in Ukraine / Russian border.

Klondike

“Klondike” depicts a family trying to survive a conflict unfolding near their home on the Ukrainian-Russian border.

CIFF will take advice from Playhouse Square regarding COVID-19 protocols, which now leaves masking decisions up to customers unless otherwise specified.

After 29 years at the now-closed Tower City Cinemas in Cleveland, and before that at the Cedar Lee Theater in Cleveland Heights, Goodman called Playhouse Square the festival’s “forever home.”

When asked if hybrid festivals would continue for CIFF in the future, Goodman said it was too early to decide. CIFF said last year’s festival reached a national audience of more than 102,000 viewers.

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7 Best Jia Zhangke Movies https://ghostsofabughraib.org/7-best-jia-zhangke-movies/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 16:31:00 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/7-best-jia-zhangke-movies/ [ad_1] What are the marks of a Jia Zhangke movie? There is emotional desire, rarely satisfied. Then there is the disconnection, miscommunication and alienation between people and the societies in which they live. Add to that the interference of technology in modern life and the consequences of an inescapably modernized face of China, all filmed […]]]>

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What are the marks of a Jia Zhangke movie? There is emotional desire, rarely satisfied. Then there is the disconnection, miscommunication and alienation between people and the societies in which they live. Add to that the interference of technology in modern life and the consequences of an inescapably modernized face of China, all filmed with camera movements at frigid speed, and you’ve pretty much nailed the stylistic marks and themes of one of the greatest filmmakers of contemporary cinema.

Don’t get me wrong, though. Jia’s photos are not so easily dissected as this one. In reality, his work embodies a seemingly endless number of complex concepts that utilize literary layers deep within their narrative. It could be compared to Yasujiro Ozu, Michelangelo AntonioniWhere Hong Sang Soo to what extent his work consists of deceptively simple pieces that contain multitudes.

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For international audiences, Jia Zhangke is the best-known figure of the “sixth generation” of Chinese filmmakers. With nearly a dozen narrative feature films and several documentaries to his credit, the filmmaker has already created an abundant body of work. With much of his most recent work regularly competing at the Cannes Film Festival, Jia Zhangke is at the forefront of critical attention.

Don’t feel like you have to dive everything in at once. Luckily, we have compiled a list of 7 of Jia Zhangke’s most essential movies for you to enjoy at your leisure.

Xiao Wu (Pickpocket, 1997)


Pickpocket

Jia Zhangke exploded onto the film scene with a trilogy of thematically and stylistically related films about disaffected youth adjusting to turn-of-the-century China. Xiao Wu, his first feature film, is also one of his most crucial. Under pressure from a local government seeking to suppress petty crime, pickpocket Xiao Wu (Hongwei Wang) suffers from a certain lack of income. His friends, mostly thieves, have adapted to legitimate methods of making money, but that doesn’t seem like a plausible option for the young man.

Also published under the title PickpocketXiao Wu is clearly the work of a young filmmaker – not in the sense of technical immaturity (it’s a polished, masterful film) but in its seething state of youthful angst. The film examines a world in which the protagonist has nowhere to go, nothing to do and no one to see, his frustration having no constructive outcome. It’s the story of a man whose fate seems to be written beyond his control, and all he can do is sit back and let it be. Yes Xiao Wu is the first photo of Jia you see, it’s enough to get you hooked. If not, that’s enough to remind you that the man is an unparalleled talent, with his artistic skill crystal clear from day one.

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Unknown Pleasures (2002)


Unknown pleasures

Unknown pleasures uses the same formula Xiao Wu and expands it to make a broader statement about an entire generation of young Chinese people. Shot in the same guerrilla style as his two previous works, the film focuses on a trio of aimless young people in Datong as they interact with each other. They watch TV, rent movies, go to nightclubs and try to plan for their uncertain future. Bin Bin (Zhao Wei Wei) has an emotionally distant relationship with his girlfriend (Zhou Qingfeng) and does little with it beyond consuming media in a hotel room. Xiaoji (Wu Qiong) forms an obsession with the dancer Qiao Qiao (Zhao Tao), but the two are having trouble connecting.

But beyond that, it’s largely about the effects of Western technology and culture on young people in 21st-century China. In a lunch scene that later turns out to have great narrative significance in the third act, Xiao Ji refers to being affected by the opening scene at pulp Fiction, and the three protagonists later dance to music taken from the film. It is another tragic story of lost youth and a crucial snapshot of an entire generation of Chinese at the turn of the millennium.

Still Life (2003)


Still life

Around the time he started to branch out into the world of documentaries, Jia made Still life, a fictional feature film that uses non-fiction filmmaking techniques and concepts to create a hybrid work. It’s a two-part story about two separate people (Han Sanming and Zhao Tao) each returning to the ancient village of Fengjie to reunite with their respective husbands. What’s the movie really apropos, however, is the slow destruction of the village by the construction of the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze River.

Jia is interested in the consequences of modernization and in Still life, it draws a direct juxtaposition between the secular village and its industrializing destroyer, the dam. The camera probes and slows down, and it often sweeps across boats, riverbeds and cityscapes to fill the frame with both natural and man-made beauty. It’s a fantastic work that puts a lot of trust in the viewer’s hands, as some cryptic title cards and an unexpected surreal event leave interpretation wide open.

I wish I knew (2010)


If only I knew

Given his interest in modernization, it makes sense that Jia Zhangke would make a documentary about the changing face of Shanghai, and given his unearthly talent as a filmmaker, it also makes sense that it would be totally effective. If only I knew, Jia’s fourth feature-length documentary features interviews from a wide range of subjects to create a time capsule of what Shanghai once was like. The film brilliantly fuses interviews and archival footage with freshly shot scenes where frequent collaborator Zhao Tao visits the locations in question to wander among the architecture, the people, and the present.

It is also largely about the films produced in Shanghai over the decades. Images from several films (including the fantastic Shanghai flowers, as well as days of being wild) serve their purposes, but they also serve as a gateway for viewers to discover the films. The interviewers of the film Taiwanese filmmaker of the New Wave Hou Hsaio-hsien and iconic actress Wei Wei, among many others. In its review of Shanghai cinema, it ranked among the important films about the city.

The Mountains Can Go (2015)


The mountains can go

There really isn’t a single moment of The mountains can go it’s not entirely obvious that Jia has mastered the medium perfectly. Set over three decades, the film follows the complicated relationship between Tao (Zhao Tao) and Jinsheng (Zhang Yi) as it changes and mutates over inexorable time. With this film, Jia continues to experiment with his narrative structure, creating three separate acts each defined by a different decade (and corresponding aspect ratio).


At its heart, however, are some of the best actors in Zhao Tao’s career, a filmography already rich in touching performances. His collaborations with Jia are numerous and it’s easy to see here why he continues to use the actress in his films. She breathes a lot of life into her conflicted characters, giving them an emotional resonance that is impossible not to admire. The mountains can go is Jia Zhangke who fires on all fronts, with crisp, rich writing, beautifully framed cinematography, and an ambitious expansion that few other filmmakers would be bold enough to tackle. As far as dramas go, it’s a smash hit.

A Touch of Sin (2013)


A touch of sin

A touch of sin is a very ambitious anthology film that features four loosely related stories set across China. Each of the four tales is based on tragic real-life news headlines, with drastic geographic and social distance between each story. It’s a departure from the typical Jia form, and its low-key, patient style is traded in favor of stylistic violence and psychological tension. Yet the themes of alienation and modernization nonetheless remain intact, and the result is a searing critique of modern Chinese society.

It’s rare for an anthology film to make each of its vignettes of equal interest, but Jia’s film pulls it off. Viewers are likely to find favorites, though each story told is crucial to the film’s strength and each is as powerful as the last. It’s easy to see why the film won Jia Zhangke Best Screenplay at Cannes: it’s a masterfully written set of stories that find greater thematic strength when compiled together, and even though each is allowed to make her own statements, they all fit together perfectly. like the pieces of a puzzle.

Ash is the Purest White (2018)


Ash is the purest white

At the heart of Ash is the purest white is Jia’s most tender love story. Taking the concept of a decades-long narrative of The mountains can gothe film follows mob boss Guo Bin (Liao fan) and his girlfriend Qiao (Zhao Tao) as they navigate their relationship after the imposition of a heavy prison sentence. As the years pass, the two men inevitably drift into each other’s lives as they become victims of the changing world around them.

Ash is the purest white takes a step back from the conventions of typical crime imagery and avoids the expected clashes of violence and revenge. Rather, it focuses on the concept of self-sacrifice and the ruthless progression of time. Qiao is one of Jia’s most tireless heroines, a tireless independent woman whose decisions need no support but her own. While there are many worthy entry points for the filmmaker’s work, this film is arguably the best place to start. Ash is the purest white is Jia’s strongest film to date and a phenomenal achievement in an already laudable career.



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Icelandic cinema and series: Hell is charming https://ghostsofabughraib.org/icelandic-cinema-and-series-hell-is-charming/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 04:01:04 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/icelandic-cinema-and-series-hell-is-charming/ [ad_1] “Trap” Iceland is an island of abundant volcanic activity with only 370,000 inhabitants. A natural paradise that has been chosen as the location for the exteriors of dozens of films and international series. But in recent years, particularly since the sector’s promotion policies promoted by a 2003 law which provides aid for the production […]]]>

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Iceland is an island of abundant volcanic activity with only 370,000 inhabitants. A natural paradise that has been chosen as the location for the exteriors of dozens of films and international series. But in recent years, particularly since the sector’s promotion policies promoted by a 2003 law which provides aid for the production of fiction in cinema, television and documentaries, it has ceased to be the exclusive destination for foreign filming to become the source of many auteur films acclaimed at festivals and also of proposals that have conquered the massive audience of the platforms streaming from around the world.

A little lamb named Ada

mutton
“Mutton”

In the first aspect appear, for example, two films that the MUBI service launched this week. “Lamb”audacious, provocative and fascinating debut film by Valdimar Jóhannsson, which won the Innovation Prize in the official Un Certain Regard competition at the last Cannes Film Festival, has Noomi Rapace (the Swedish actress who played Lisbeth Salander in the original saga based on the novels by Stieg Larsson) and Ingvar (Hilmir Snær Guðnason) as a couple who live on a farm in the middle of nowhere, an area in the middle of hills so beautiful as inhospitable (especially in winter).

When the weather improves, they work with the tractor they drive and raise sheep. There are dogs, cats, horses, lambs in the place, but they live in absolute solitude. And in a decision that will change the course of their lives (and of the film), they adopt a little lamb, which they name Adaand they begin to raise him as if he were their son.

So far what we can reveal so as not to fall into frustrating spoilers. In the second half, Pétur (Björn Hlynur Haraldsson), Ingvar’s temperamental brother, will arrive on the scene, and this strange presence will invade the apparent idyll and give an outsider’s look at the matter.

The film -conceived by Sjón, the country’s most prestigious writer as a novelist, poet, screenwriter and composer and lyricist on several albums by his compatriot Björk- is quite austere, ascetic and “Icelandic” (geography and idiosyncrasy make it an adjective) with creative use of visual effects and a certain misshapen fairy tale imprint reminiscent of “Border: I felt something beautiful”by Ali Abbasi, and disruptive, surreal and fantastic elements that burst in the middle of the rural drama and refer to the cinema of Robert Eggers and Ari Aster.

Chased
“Chased”

The second novelty of MUBI is “Chased” (“Bergmál”), by Rúnar Rúnarsson. The director’s most recent film of “Volcano” and “Gorriones” / “Sparrows” (winner of the Golden Shell at the San Sebastian Film Festival 2015) offers a portrait of modern Iceland at Christmas. A social fresco where the chain of gags highlights the most common differences between the inhabitants of this country and which received a very good reception when it premiered at the International Competition of the Locarno Festival 2019.

From stopping a penalty against Messi to leading the police

Some compare the fashion for Icelandic (audiovisual) cinema to that enjoyed in 2018 by the football team which, in a country so sparsely populated and without outdoor sporting activity for much of the year due to very low temperatures, managed to qualify for the World Cup in Russia.

And these links between football and cinema are not capricious. Some will remember that in the 1-1 draw against Argentina Hannes Þór Halldórsson saved a penalty from Messi himself. At this time, of course, the profiles of the “filmmaker goalkeeper” intensified, although at this time he only shot a few short-lived commercials and documentaries.

As well as, Halldórsson hung up his gloves, put down his bow, grabbed the camera and surprised by creating last August as part of the International Competition of the very prestigious Locarno Festival (Switzerland) “Secret Cop”a code of satirical detective comedy that mocks the usual narrative codes of this type of story with an agent with Clint Eastwood’s pretensions who arranges everything while shooting and a villain with a model past who seems taken from “Zoolander”.

King Midas in Iceland

Everest
Everest

Beyond the very curious case of Halldórsson, it is not possible to tour the Icelandic audiovisual industry without putting center stage Baltasar Kormakurwho after getting noticed with feature films in his country such as “Winter hot” (2000), “A trip to paradise” (2005) and “The depth” (2012) regularly ventured to Hollywood with “Two Lethal Weapons” (2013), a combination of friends and neo-noir film starring Denzel Washington and Mark Wahlberg that includes everything from millionaire bank robberies to the presence of the CIA, FBI, DEA, military intelligence and Mexican drug cartel agents; Everest (2015), about the true story of a rugged expedition to the highest mountain in the world with Jason Clarke, Josh Brolin, John Hawkes, Robin Wright, Emily Watson, Keira Knightley, Sam Worthington and Jake Gyllenhaal; and “Adrift” (2018), survival story with Shailene Woodley.

But Kormákur did not remain in the comfort (or temptation) of Hollywood and returned to his country as showrunner, producer and director of several episodes of two notable series that can be seen on Netflix: “Trap”, a thriller starring Ólafur Darri Ólafsson -something like Icelandic Ricardo Darín- about the murders that rock a small community in a remote area amid winter storms; and “Katla”, disturbing story in a city marked by the ashes which come from a volcano and by mysterious apparitions. These are two notable forays into genres that have nothing to envy to the fashionable Nordic noir of more traditional – and much more productive – countries like Denmark, Sweden or Norway.

More recommendations

Rams The story of two brothers and eight sheep
“Aries: the story of two brothers and eight sheep”

The force of wilderness and the psychological effects of isolation, desolation and isolation are also present in classics like “Children of Nature”, a film by Fridrik Thor Fridriksson which to date is the only one from this origin to have been nominated for an Oscar in 1992; and in other precious titles that have passed through Argentine cinemas such as “Woman at War” (2018), by Benedikt Erlingsson (the same director of “Stories of Horses and Men”); “Aries: the story of two brothers and eight sheep”a tragi-comedy that focuses on the relationship between two brothers who don’t even speak to each other in the setting of a small, isolated town and which won director Grímur Hákonarson first prize in the Un Certain Regard section of the 2015 Cannes Film Festival .

Also from the recent crop of the Icelandic career, “Vinterbrødre” / “Winter Brothers”, by Hlynur Pálmason, deserves to be highlighted, a powerful, sordid and provocative story which won the Best Actor award for Elliott Crosset Hoveen at Locarno 2017, also about two brothers who in this case they work inside a mine; “Good Neighbours”, by Hafsteinn Gunnar Sigurðsson, honored at the Venice Film Festival and Icelandic representative at the Oscar in 2019, which relies on harsh humor to tell the argument between two families over the shade caused by the branches of a tree; while offering comedic elements “The Woman of the Mountain”, a film by Benedikt Erlingsson about a farmer’s struggle against the economic interests of a powerful mafia that harms her way of life and the environment. In this reissue of the myth of David against Goliath, the comedy leaves room, of course, for political criticism with very good artistic results.

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Big Sky Documentary Film Festival Highlights – February 26 | ABC Fox Missoula https://ghostsofabughraib.org/big-sky-documentary-film-festival-highlights-february-26-abc-fox-missoula/ Sat, 26 Feb 2022 15:00:00 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/big-sky-documentary-film-festival-highlights-february-26-abc-fox-missoula/ [ad_1] The 19th Annual Big Sky Documentary Film Festival is a hybrid event. Screenings at Wilma, Roxy, ZACC and MCT run through February 27. The seats are limited; advance purchase of tickets is highly recommended at bigskyfilmfest.org/festival/tickets. Door-to-door sales are not guaranteed to spectators who arrive without a ticket. All tickets are good for in-person […]]]>

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The 19th Annual Big Sky Documentary Film Festival is a hybrid event. Screenings at Wilma, Roxy, ZACC and MCT run through February 27. The seats are limited; advance purchase of tickets is highly recommended at bigskyfilmfest.org/festival/tickets. Door-to-door sales are not guaranteed to spectators who arrive without a ticket. All tickets are good for in-person or online screenings.

The shorts are available online until Thursday, March 3. Feature films will be available for viewing online for four days, beginning the day after the film’s last in-person screening.

SPECIAL EVENTS

Native Voices Speaker Series, Panel #2 – Reciprocity: Human Relationship with the Earth. A deep dive with Indigenous filmmakers from the Reciprocity Project. Free and open to the public, but registration required. On the BSDFF website, select “Exhibitions” under the “Festival” tab. Marriott Residence Inn, 125 N. Pattee St. 12:00 p.m.

MOVIES

“When a City Rises” – a gripping account of the pro-democracy movement in Hong Kong. The film follows a teenage couple in love, a student leader and a father, as they navigate a year inside the movement. Relationships break and form amid tear gas and rubber bullets, and across the border the Chinese People’s Liberation Army waits. North American premiere. ZACC, 11:45 a.m.

‘Dear Mr. Brody’ – In 1970, a 21-year-old hippie millionaire promised to give his $25 million inheritance to anyone who sent him a letter in an effort to usher in a new era of world peace. A psychedelic journey into the heart (and bank account) of Michael Brody, Jr, who offered world peace for the price of a postage stamp. First in Montana. Missoula Children’s Theater, 5:15 p.m.

‘The Art of Making It’ – A diverse cast of young artists confront defining moments in their careers to determine if the ecosystem of the art world that is supposed to nurture them is truly failing them. The film is both a cautionary tale about what America stands to lose if we don’t rethink the way we value artists, and a love letter to those who persevere in their artistic practice despite the extraordinary odds of achieve a sustainable career. First in Montana. Roxy, 5:30 p.m.

‘Still Max’ – Suffering from prostate cancer, multidisciplinary artist Max Dean asks, ‘How can we cure ourselves?’ Driven by an unbridled imagination, Max visualizes his illness not only physically but physiologically. In this journey of artistic exploration, Max Dean confirms that he is “Still Max” – always curious and thoughtful, always seeking to know himself. American premiere. ZACC, 7:30 p.m.

‘Raya Sinitsina’s War’ – A young filmmaker follows Raya, a 94-year-old Soviet war hero who fought in the siege of Leningrad. As Raya deals with the loss of her last comrades and her health deteriorates, the two become close friends, which awakens the young woman in her. Through his dreams, time and age lose all meaning. What begins as a film about war and loss turns into a story of love and friendship. First Northwest. Missoula Children’s Theater, 8 p.m.

‘Time of the Fireflies’ – Despite the loneliness he experiences in New York, Miguel remains resolutely motivated to help the family he hasn’t seen in 13 years. Combining dreamlike depictions of memories of Miguel’s childhood in Oaxaca, Mexico, with his daily experience as a migrant worker, it is a poignant portrayal of the sacrifice many are forced to make to provide for the needs of their family. First Northwest. Roxy, 8:15 p.m.

FILMMAKERS PRESENT

Questions and answers after the screening of the film

“Memory Lanes” – Brian Gertsen, director. First in Montana. “Conversations between teams” – Ben Basem, director. First Northwest. Short Block 14. ZACC, 2:30 p.m.

“The Great Silence” – Joel Elliott, director. World premiere. “Where is my darling? – Adam Finney, director. North American premiere. Short Block 15. Roxy, 3:15 p.m.

“The Art of Doing It” – Kelcey Edwards, director. Roxy, 5:30 p.m.

Festival Headquarters: ZACC, 216 W Main St. Purchase tickets, passes and merchandise. 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

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The Tampa Theater will screen all Oscar-nominated shorts https://ghostsofabughraib.org/the-tampa-theater-will-screen-all-oscar-nominated-shorts/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 18:53:46 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/the-tampa-theater-will-screen-all-oscar-nominated-shorts/ [ad_1] Starting Friday, the historic Tampa Theater will show all the best Oscar nominees for short films, including animated films, documentaries and live action. This all leads up to the big night of the Oscars on March 27; The Tampa Theater is one of the few theaters licensed to carry the live stream. In the […]]]>

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Starting Friday, the historic Tampa Theater will show all the best Oscar nominees for short films, including animated films, documentaries and live action. This all leads up to the big night of the Oscars on March 27; The Tampa Theater is one of the few theaters licensed to carry the live stream.

In the past, the 96-year-old movie palace has shown all the top Oscar nominees. But due to the tight schedule of this year’s Oscars calendar and the fact that the cinema has already shown most of the best feature films, they have decided to focus on Oscar-nominated shorts, a spokeswoman said.

Related: The Tampa Theater will resume its lecture series with Geena Davis, astronaut and best-selling ethics author

On Tuesday, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced that eight prizes will be awarded off-air, including the three short film prizes. According to the Associated Press, the awards for Editing, Production Design, Sound, Makeup and Hair, Music (Original Score) and the three Short Film Awards (Documentary, Live Action and Animation) will be awarded at a ceremony before March. 27 broadcast.

The collection of five Oscar-nominated live-action shorts includes In my thoughts, an 18-minute Danish film in which a man wants to sing a song for his wife. “It has to be today, it has to be now. It’s a matter of life, death and karaoke,” said the promo for the film. Also on the list of nominees is the futuristic Please wait, in which a prisoner must navigate the labyrinthine, computerized bureaucracy of privatized American justice, in search of a real human being who can turn the situation around.

An Oscar-nominated Afghan short film, “Three Songs for Benazir” reveals how Afghans today live, love and seek space for themselves in a context of constant instability. [ Tampa Theatre ]

Usually filled with dark stories, this year’s list of documentary shorts is considered one of the most uplifting collections. He understands When we were bullies, a 36-minute film about the mind-blowing coincidence that leads the filmmaker to reunite with his fifth grade class and teacher to examine their memory of a bullying incident 50 years ago. And from Afghanistan comes the award-winning Three songs for Benazirwhich reveals how today’s Afghans live, love and seek space for themselves in a context of constant instability.

Animated collections include robin robin, the story of a little bird whose unhatched egg falls from the nest and falls into the trash can. “She comes out of her shell, in more ways than one, and is adopted by a loving family of mouse burglars,” the producers write. In art business, director Joanna Quinn and screenwriter Les Mills continue their series of award-winning British animated films starring Beryl, a 59-year-old factory worker obsessed with drawing. They may be animated films, but many in the collection are not intended for children, the theater warns.

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Live Action Shorts

The collection of live-action shorts will premiere at 7:30 p.m. on Friday Monday and March 3, as well as at 5:15 p.m. on March 5; 3:00 p.m. March 6; and 7:30 p.m. on March 9.

Although there are a variety of films, this program of shorts is considered rated R for language and depictions of adult themes and violence.

Short documentaries

The documentary collection will be screened at 6:30 p.m. on Saturday; 7 p.m. on March 1 and 4; 1:45 p.m. March 5; and 7 p.m. on March 7.

Note that while this program is unrated, it should be treated as a PG-13 equivalent, the theater says.

Among the Oscar-nominated animated shorts is "Business of Art." Director Joanna Quinn and screenwriter Les Mills continue the series of award-winning British animated films starring Beryl, a 59-year-old factory worker obsessed with drawing and determined to become a hyper futuristic artist.
Among the Oscar-nominated animated shorts is “Art Affairs.” Director Joanna Quinn and screenwriter Les Mills continue the series of award-winning British animated films starring Beryl, a 59-year-old factory worker obsessed with drawing and determined to become a hyper futuristic artist. [ Tampa Theatre ]

Animated short films

The collection of animated shorts premieres at 6:30 p.m. Sunday; 7:00 p.m. March 2; 8:00 p.m. March 5; 6:00 p.m. March 6; and 7:30 p.m. on March 8.

The theater warns that although these shorts are animated, they are not intended for children and should be considered rated R for depictions of nudity, adult themes, disturbing imagery and extreme violence.

Tickets are $11.50, $9.50 for ages 3-12 at the theater at 711 N Franklin St., Tampa, or online at tampatheatre.org.

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Big Sky Film Fest Highlights for Sunday | Arts & Theater https://ghostsofabughraib.org/big-sky-film-fest-highlights-for-sunday-arts-theater/ Sat, 19 Feb 2022 23:00:00 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/big-sky-film-fest-highlights-for-sunday-arts-theater/ [ad_1] NICK DAVIS Big Sky Documentary Film Festival The 19th Annual Big Sky Documentary Film Festival is a hybrid event. Screenings at Wilma, Roxy, ZACC and MCT run through February 27. The seats are limited; advance purchase of tickets is highly recommended at bigskyfilmfest.org/festival/tickets. Door-to-door sales are not guaranteed to spectators who arrive without a […]]]>

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NICK DAVIS Big Sky Documentary Film Festival

The 19th Annual Big Sky Documentary Film Festival is a hybrid event. Screenings at Wilma, Roxy, ZACC and MCT run through February 27. The seats are limited; advance purchase of tickets is highly recommended at bigskyfilmfest.org/festival/tickets. Door-to-door sales are not guaranteed to spectators who arrive without a ticket. All tickets are good for in-person or online screenings.

The shorts will be available online from Monday February 21 to Thursday March 3. Feature films will be available for viewing online for four days, beginning the day after the film’s last in-person screening.

Movies

“Hockeyland” – In northern Minnesota, two rival high school hockey teams face off for a coveted state championship in one of the most hockey-obsessed communities in the United States. With the hopes of their cities behind them, the teenagers are under intense pressure to succeed at what seems to be the pivotal moment in their lives. Wilma, 12:30 p.m.

“Objects” — Three people share stories of strange but precious objects that help them find meaning in life. This film is a heartfelt celebration of the useless things we collect and a playful rejection of the “minimalist lifestyle” movement. ZACC, 2:30 p.m.

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“Someone Like Me” — the parallel journeys of Drake, a gay asylum seeker from Uganda, and a group of outsiders from Vancouver’s queer community tasked with supporting his resettlement in Canada. Together they embark on a year-long quest for personal freedom, revealing how, in a world where one must constantly fight for the right to exist, survival itself becomes a victory. Roxy, 2:45 p.m.

“Daughter of a Lost Bird” — Missoula resident Kendra Mylnechuk Potter, an Indigenous woman adopted into a white family, reconnects with her Indigenous identity and begins to see herself as a living legacy of American assimilationist politics. First in Montana. Wilma, 3:15 p.m.

“Tidy” — Set in the Maasai homeland of Kenya, an intimate and contemporary story of self-discovery unfolds, as 12 women become East Africa’s first all-female anti-poaching unit. Reversing the male-dominated reliance on military-style training to make a ranger, Virginia, Liz, Momina and Damaris instead undergo a year-long program of deep trauma release and healing, sparking profound transformation. themselves and sending shockwaves through their communities. First Northwest. Roxy, 5:15 p.m.

“One of Us” — Josiah was adopted as a baby in Haiti and grew up in an Indigenous family in Calgary, Canada. Years later, when Josiah is racially profiled at an Indigenous basketball tournament and denied the right to play a sport he deeply loves, his experience makes headlines. A nuanced examination of adoption, belonging and the complexities of identity. ZACC, 7:30 p.m.

“Kímmapiiyipitssini: the meaning of empathy” — An intimate portrait of the impacts of substance use and the overdose epidemic on the Blackfoot Reserve in Alberta. The film follows community members with substance use disorders, first responders and medical professionals as they adopt radical harm reduction practices. Connecting the traumas of settler colonialism to the contemporary struggles of Indigenous peoples, it is a complex and powerful story of resistance and community care. Roxy, 7:45 p.m.

“Accepted” – TM Landry, an unconventional prep school in Louisiana, has claimed an astonishing 100% college acceptance rate with many students admitted to the most elite colleges. After an explosive NY Times article exposes its dynamic founder’s controversial teaching methods, the school struggles to stay afloat. With intimate access to the school and its students, this film examines the issues and inequalities within the American education system. Wilma, 8 p.m.

The filmmakers present

Questions and answers after the screening of the film

“After Antarctica” – Tasha Van Zandt, director; Sébastien Zeck, producer; Will Steger, subject. ZACC, 11:45 a.m.

“Hockeyland” – Tommy Haines, director; Andrew Sherburn, producer. First Northwest. Wilma, 12:30 p.m.

“Objects” — Vincent Liota, director. ZACC, 2:30 p.m.

“Daughter of a Lost Bird” – Brooke Pepion Swaney, director; Kendra Mylnechuk Potter, subject. Wilma, 3:15 p.m.

“Less Deadly” – Jaime Wilken, director. First in Montana. “Groundhog Town” – David Zucker, director. World premiere. “Black Gold” – Sydney Linden, director. World premiere. “Monumental Divide” – Brian Olliver, director. World premiere. Shorts block, ZACC, 5 p.m.

“Ranger” – Austin J. Peck, director. First Northwest. Roxy, 5:15 p.m.

“Look at the Fish” – Ashleigh McArthur, director. World premiere. “My Duduś” – Tom Krawczyk, director. Block shorts, Wilma, 5:30 p.m.

Festival Headquarters: ZACC, 216 W Main St. Purchase tickets, passes and merchandise. 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

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Turn off the lights! The Big Muddy Film Festival returns to familiar surroundings https://ghostsofabughraib.org/turn-off-the-lights-the-big-muddy-film-festival-returns-to-familiar-surroundings/ Wed, 16 Feb 2022 23:36:20 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/turn-off-the-lights-the-big-muddy-film-festival-returns-to-familiar-surroundings/ [ad_1] CARBONDALE — As the 44th annual Big Muddy Film Festival prepares for another year of showcasing some of the best independent filmmakers, one of Southern Illinois University Carbondale’s signature events will return to a more familiar setting: a theater. After the 2021 edition was limited to a virtual format due to the COVID-19 pandemic, […]]]>

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CARBONDALE — As the 44th annual Big Muddy Film Festival prepares for another year of showcasing some of the best independent filmmakers, one of Southern Illinois University Carbondale’s signature events will return to a more familiar setting: a theater.

After the 2021 edition was limited to a virtual format due to the COVID-19 pandemic, this year’s festival, February 24-27, will have screenings at the Varsity Theater, 418 S. Illinois Ave., and at the University Museum on campus. One of the country’s oldest film festivals affiliated with a university and widely known for its strong documentaries that shine a light on social issues will feature 81 competitive films in the animation, experimental, narrative and documentary categories, as well as the John Michaels competition Awards.

All events are free and open to the public. The university is committed to protecting the community, so visitors should follow current campus and state pandemic safety protocols and wear masks in shared indoor spaces.

concise party

While the festival will last four days, there will be plenty for audiences to see, said Sarah Lewison, associate professor of radio, television and digital media at the College of Arts and Media’s School of Media Arts. With nine different programs of short films, besides the opening feature, there will be films to please everyone.

This year was “focusing on shorts and the interesting relationships between those shorts,” Lewison said. “We’ve been very selective this year. Every film we place in the festival is a film we can’t wait to see again.”

Accomplished media creators are jurors

Jurors include Valerie Soe, an award-winning media artist from the Sam Francisco Bay area; Roya Ebtehaj, interdisciplinary animator and media artist, and Dan Mirvish, director, screenwriter, producer and critically acclaimed author, co-founder of the annual Slamdance film festival in Park City, Utah. All rated movies from home. Soe and Ebtehaj’s lectures will take place on February 24 at the John C. Guyon Auditorium at the Morris Library. A public reception will be held at 2 p.m.

Soe is a professor of Asian American Studies at San Francisco State University. His experimental videos, installations and documentaries have been shown in festivals, museums and galleries around the world. Soe’s presentation is at 1 p.m.

Ebtehaj is an inclusive postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Art and Art History at Santa Clara State University, where she teaches courses in digital media. Ebtehaj uses XR, 3D, animation, video, web, print and installation, and his work has been shown around the world. His presentation is at 3 p.m.

Mirvish’s 2021 film, “18½,” premieres at 7 p.m. Feb. 24 at the Varsity Theater. The film is a “70s Watergate thriller/dark comedy” that examines the gap in President Nixon’s missing audio tape. The political satire will air at Carbondale more than a month ahead of a scheduled premiere at the Manchester Film Festival in England. Organizers are also working with Mirvish on details for an online event.

Nine programs over three days

The festival will offer nine programs of shorts and films in competition from February 25 to 27, all at the Varsity Theater. Programs are listed on bigmuddyfilmfestival.com. The “Best of the Festival,” a screening of the award-winning films, will take place February 27 at 6 p.m. at the Varsity Theater. The festival also has a Facebook page.

Along with the four categories, the festival will also feature films for the John Michaels Prize, which focuses on stories that highlight struggles for social and environmental justice. The contest honors the late John Michaels, a film student in the 1980s who earned his MFA at SIU Carbondale and was involved in community organizing and activism before he died of breast cancer. brain.

The university museum is a new place

An addition this year is the “Moods of Modernity” film installation which will feature seven films available for viewing at the University Museum on campus. The compilation in the Saluki Gallery runs until March 12 during regular University Museum hours. Additionally, memorabilia, including old Big Muddy Film Festival posters and programs, will be on display.

“For anyone who follows the history of cinema, especially the history of independent cinema, there is a wealth of really interesting material, especially in the programmes. At the start of the festival, we brought in some of the most important experimental and documentary filmmakers in the world,” Lewison said.

The enthusiasm is there

A film committee made up of students, faculty members and the community selected this year’s programming. Lewison said the students who will present the programs are enthusiastic.

“We have a fantastic group of people working on the festival. We are really excited to host these films and to welcome guests to the Varsity Theater,” said Lewison, noting that the long-time patrons of the festival tell stories. previous successes. .

“We have that feeling of excitement. We take that energy and try to tap into that flow and bring it back to life,” she said.

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