york city – Ghosts Of Abu Ghraib http://ghostsofabughraib.org/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 12:28:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-120x120.jpg york city – Ghosts Of Abu Ghraib http://ghostsofabughraib.org/ 32 32 International Women’s Day: 7 new TV shows to watch that will empower and inspire https://ghostsofabughraib.org/international-womens-day-7-new-tv-shows-to-watch-that-will-empower-and-inspire/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 08:01:02 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/international-womens-day-7-new-tv-shows-to-watch-that-will-empower-and-inspire/ March 07, 2022 – 08:01 GMT Francesca Shillcock On this International Women’s Day, there is plenty to watch on television that tells incredible stories about, for and by women. Check out the list of brand new TV shows to watch to celebrate this special day… This International Women’s Day, why not take the […]]]>





Francesca Shillcock




This International Women’s Day, why not take the opportunity to celebrate and recognize not only the women in your life, but also women around the world? It is the day to celebrate empowerment, equality and all that women have achieved throughout history to the present day, and to recognize the important journey that many still face.


MORE: Bridgerton star Ruby Barker talks the show’s future – and we’re intrigued!


However you choose to mark the day, there’s something about watching inspiring movies or TV shows that can be both uplifting and empowering. We’ve put together a list of brand new content that has been launched recently for you to enjoy.


Whether it’s a documentary exploring the life and career of one of the most successful women in music history, or a gripping documentary series that chronicles how three women fought against a notorious scammer on Tinder – these shows all share the goal of powerful women in the foreground. Good viewing!


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WATCH: Are you ready for Killing Eve Season 4?


Kill Eve


Available on BBC/BBCAmerica


When Kill Eve First debuting in 2018, Sandra Oh and Jodie Comer have become one of television’s most powerful couples. Villanelle and Eve are back for one last ride as the cat-and-mouse duo no one expected to support at first. The final season sees the two back and forth once more – but will they finally get their happy ending?


The names behind the camera are no less iconic, with each season providing a new pen behind. Fleabag’s Phoebe Waller-Bridge worked on the first season, while Emerald Fennell took over in the second season. Suzanne Heathcote directed the third series, and for the final offering, Sex Education writer Laura Neal is boss – and we can’t wait.


MORE: International Women’s Day 2022: 30 of the best women-founded brands we love to buy


MORE: 19 Best Girl Boss Gifts to Celebrate International Women’s Day



kill-eve-4


Sandra Oh is back as Eve Polastri


The Tinder scammer


Available on Netflix


On hearing about The Tinder scammer for the first time, you might think – why is this stimulating? A prolific scammer uses Tinder to cheat women for lack of money, security and trust? But the story goes beyond that. As the synopsis indicates, The Tinder scammer documents how a woman wanted to take control of the situation.


MORE: The Tinder Swindler: Where’s Simon Leviev now?


“When Cecilie meets a handsome billionaire playboy, she can’t believe it when he turns out to be the man of her dreams. But dreams aren’t real and when she finds out that this international businessman is not who he claims he is, it’s too late, he took her for everything.


“Where this fairy tale ends, a revenge thriller begins. Cecilie discovers her other targets and once they regroup, they are no longer victims: THE TINDER SINDLER meets its match.”



scammer


The Tinder Swindler is now on Netflix


Janet


Available on Sky Documentaries and NOW


The Janet Jackson documentary sparked a lot of discussion when it was announced – and now all four episodes are available to watch in full. The series explores the personal life and historic career of one of modern music’s most iconic performers.


Not only was Janet a pioneer in her sound, but also in the cultural empowerment of women around the world. Many female artists now look to her as the role model – this one is not to be missed.



Janet Jackson


Janet is a powerful watch


sweet magnolias


Available now on Netflix


sweet magnolias is the perfect show that celebrates the value and importance of female friendships. The lighthearted romantic drama was comfort television at its finest when it released in 2020 and season two promises much the same.


The new episodes will reunite viewers with Maddie Townsend, Dana Sue Sullivan and Helen Decatur to explore what happens next. It picks up right where the first left off, so it’ll be like they never left.



sweet-magnolias-2


Are you a fan of Sweet Magnolias?


I am Georgina


Available now on Netflix


Cristiano Ronaldo is one of the most powerful sportsmen in the world, but you might not know his partner Georgina as well. This Netflix documentary seeks to change that by introducing us to the model, businesswoman and influencer – who also happens to be the mother of their daughter, Alana Martina.


The synopsis describes the show as a “A moving, in-depth portrait of the woman behind the covers, photos, stories and headlines.


MORE: Cristiano Ronaldo’s girlfriend Georgina Rodriguez’s Netflix reality show has fans saying the same thing


“Soy Georgina will reveal to us all aspects of her life, from the most public and well-known to the most personal. We will live with her her daily life, her motherhood, her relationship, her travels, her evenings. .. We will learn who Georgina Rodríguez really is.”



georgina-netflix


Have you seen I Am Georgina?


And just like that…


Available now on Sky Comedy, NOW and HBO Max


Throughout the 90s, sex and the city was the go-to show for young single and professional women – making it one of the most popular television shows of all time. So when Carrie, Miranda, and Charlotte returned for a reboot (not to mention the two in-between movies, of course), fans were thrilled.


MORE: Sex and the City is getting another spinoff episode – get the details


Although it was bittersweet without Kim Cattrall’s Samantha Jones retaliating, it seems And just like that was welcomed with open arms. There’s even talk of a round two, so now’s the perfect time to catch up if you missed it!



and-like-this-again


Sarah Jessica Parker as Carrie in And Just Like That…


The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel


Available now on Prime Video


In another decade you can find The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel. For those unaware, the series tells the story of Miriam ‘Midge’ Maisel, an aspiring comedian who pursues her dreams in New York City. It’s been a few years since we’ve had Miriam on screen, but season four should be our best yet.



wonderful-mrs-maisel


The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel recently returned for season four


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The HELLO! is editorial and independently chosen – we only feature articles that our editors like and approve of. GOOD MORNING! may receive a share of sales or other compensation from the links on this page. To find out more visit our FAQs.


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Super Bowl LVI: Famous Rams Fans vs. Famous Bengals Fans | Gallery https://ghostsofabughraib.org/super-bowl-lvi-famous-rams-fans-vs-famous-bengals-fans-gallery/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 13:23:00 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/super-bowl-lvi-famous-rams-fans-vs-famous-bengals-fans-gallery/ By Mark Gray 5:23 a.m. PST, February 9, 2022 _ On February 13, 2022, Super Bowl LVI will kick off at SoFi Stadium in Inglewood, California. With the stadium being so close to Hollywood, you can expect a host of famous faces in the crowd. Many of them will even have a huge interest in […]]]>


5:23 a.m. PST, February 9, 2022



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What’s happening in Evanston the week of February 6 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/whats-happening-in-evanston-the-week-of-february-6/ Mon, 07 Feb 2022 03:20:42 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/whats-happening-in-evanston-the-week-of-february-6/ Here are some ways to celebrate Black History Month and avoid the outdoors this week in Evanston as the weather remains below zero. winter wonderland 1 Feb. – Feb. 28, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Made in Evanston hosts an art-making and community-building event at Canal Shores Golf Course throughout February. The group is working […]]]>

Here are some ways to celebrate Black History Month and avoid the outdoors this week in Evanston as the weather remains below zero.

winter wonderland

1 Feb. – Feb. 28, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Made in Evanston hosts an art-making and community-building event at Canal Shores Golf Course throughout February. The group is working to transform the golf course into an outdoor gallery of art installations.

Celebrate Black History Month at the Evanston Public Library

February 1 to March 1

Here is a list of this week’s programs at the Evanston Public Library to celebrate Black History Month. Events include “Make Your Own Cartoon Glass Painting” and “Make Your Own Basquiat-Inspired Crown.”

Seek and Find – Black History Themed Scavenger Hunt

February 1 to 28

The Main and Crown Branch Libraries will host a mini indoor scavenger hunt all month dedicated to Black History in Evanston.

Keynote speaker: Ayanna Legros

February 7, 6:30 p.m.

Ayanna Legros is a historian of 20th century Caribbean and Latin American history. She studies oral histories, radio program transcripts, tapes, and songs to tell the story of the Haitian people’s political vision for the nation in her dissertation, “Echoes in Exile: Hatian Radio Activism in New York City. (1969-2002).”

Black History 24/7/365: Black Women in American History

February 8, 12 p.m.

The Fleetwood-Jourdain Theater will air the profile of a black woman who made their mark on America every Tuesday at noon during the month of February. You can watch every episode on fjtheatre.com.

Mental Health Matters — Seasonal Affective Disorder

February 8, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.

The Naomi Ruth Cohen Institute for Mental Health Education at the Chicago School of Professional Psychology will host Tracy Levine, a licensed clinical social worker, to discuss community mental health. Levine will discuss Seasonal Affective Disorder, the impact of COVID-19, and self-care strategies and resources.

A Conversation with Dr. Ava Thompson Greenwell, Mandela’s Director in Chicago

February 10, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Medill Prof. Ava Thompson Greenwell will discuss her documentary “Mandela in Chicago”. The documentary chronicles Nelson Mandela’s trip to Chicago in 1993, a year before he was elected president of South Africa.

Terra Femme (2021) documentary-live performance with Courtney Stephens

February 11, 7 p.m.

The Block Museum is screening a documentary-live performance hybrid, Terra Femme, which documents the history of travel filmmakers from the 1920s to the 1950s. It draws on archival material to investigate the relationship between gender and genre.

E-mail: [email protected]

Twitter: @avanidkalra

Related stories:

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The week ahead: What’s happening in Evanston the week of January 30?



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The Vineyard Gazette – Martha’s Vineyard News https://ghostsofabughraib.org/the-vineyard-gazette-marthas-vineyard-news/ Thu, 03 Feb 2022 20:02:00 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/the-vineyard-gazette-marthas-vineyard-news/ Victoria Campbell has always been a storyteller, and The Vineyard provided some of her early inspirations. “It was a great place to fire up the imagination,” the actress-turned-filmmaker said last week over the phone from her parents’ home in Vineyard Haven. “I spent a lot of time alone in the woods, walking and making up […]]]>

Victoria Campbell has always been a storyteller, and The Vineyard provided some of her early inspirations.

“It was a great place to fire up the imagination,” the actress-turned-filmmaker said last week over the phone from her parents’ home in Vineyard Haven.

“I spent a lot of time alone in the woods, walking and making up stories in my head and talking to trees, so that was a great start,” said Ms Campbell, who recently co-hosted a series of films for the Museum. of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York.

Presenting at MoMA February 16-17, the program celebrates the Millennium Film Workshop, an influential hub for experimental filmmakers since the 1960s.

“It was this ruined place in the East Village, but with all this crazy history,” Ms Campbell said.

“Andy Warhol had been there. Todd Haynes had shown his first film there. Steve Buscemi used to rent equipment. . . A whole host of names,” she said.

Mrs. Campbell discovered the studio after making her first film, House of Bones, about her family in the vineyard.

“I had my first screening in New York there. A hundred people came, and it was great,” she recalls. “Then I worked there and took some tickets and I saw all kinds of movies that I would never have seen, [and] then I decided that I had to go back to school.

She chose the documentary program at the School of Visual Arts in New York, learning new ways of telling stories in

her head.

“I want to experience what a documentary can be,” Ms. Campbell said. “I like the texture of it. You’re not tied to any studio or team – you can go out and do these stories on your own.

She also learned visual techniques at the Cinema Workshop, which closed in 2011 and sold its archives to MoMA.

“Millennium really taught me how to use Super 8,” she said, referring to the Eastman Kodak color film format introduced in 1965. ce.”

She also used the format in Haiti, where she worked as a humanitarian volunteer after the 2010 earthquake.

Compared to the immense capacity of digital files, Ms. Campbell said, film imposes a certain discipline.

“I think you shoot with more focus,” she said.

Her journey to acting began on stage, as she sought to establish an acting career after college.

“I was really motivated to play, ever since I was young,” she said. “I loved acting, and that was really what I thought I would end up doing.”

But after majoring in French and Italian literature at Bard College, she came up against the harsh reality of pursuing an acting career in New York and Los Angeles.

“New York has been a lot harder than I thought it would be, auditioning and trying to make money as an actress,” she said. “We did Shakespeare in the parking lot, not in the park.”

Ms Campbell has found a few film roles in Los Angeles, but scoffs at the work she has done, such as portraying ‘the angry woman’ in a TV Life of Christ.

“I was supposed to be Mary Magdalene, but [the actor playing] Jesus was too small,” she recalls.

Other potential bookings were also uninspiring, she said.

“They really liked me for the reality show [with] Flava Flav. It was things like that, like being the girlfriend or the best friend,” she said. “I hate that feeling of waiting to do someone else’s job and being directed. You’re giving up so much of your own power, which I’ve been doing for so long.

Back in New York, Ms. Campbell finally followed through on what a filmmaker friend had suggested to her from their college days.

“He always told me to take a camera and film my family,” she said.

The death of his beloved grandmother catapulted House of Bones.

“They were going to sell [her] house that summer,” said Ms. Campbell, remembering her next thought: “I’m going to get a camera and capture that crazy house and all the characters. »

Self-taught as she went, Ms Campbell traced the struggle of her grieving family members with the loss of the family matriarch and her generational home on the island.

His most recent documentaries include Dimka, which portrays a transvestite Russian exile and was screened at Martha’s Vineyard Film Society’s Spectrum festival last spring, and Mr. President, filmed during his travels in Haiti.

Ms. Campbell’s shorter, more experimental works are represented in MoMA screenings with In Betweens, a six-minute, 35-second audiovisual tapestry of New York City.

Weaving interior and exterior shots, found images, environmental sounds and lyrics, the film acts as a meditation on time, space and consciousness as well as a portrait of the city.

“I was playing with the way we see in New York, and the space and how the space has changed,” said Ms. Campbell, who included snaps of the old Millennium Center after it closed.

“Sometimes in New York things go so fast that you don’t always know how [quickly] things are changing,” she said.

His other job, as a middle school teacher in the South Bronx, led to a short film in the series directed by two of his students, siblings Roberto and Anexsa Polanco.

“They had an idea and they went out and made a movie,” she said of Polancos’ dystopian Future Visions.

Her own college years were not her happiest, Ms Campbell recalls. “I was very excited to get off the island and see the world,” she said.

Now she’s not just back in the middle grades — she’s also on the vineyard again: During a year off from Middle School 562 in the South Bronx, Ms. Campbell teaches English to students in seventh and eighth at West Tisbury School, just upstairs. the road from where she attended Tisbury School in the 1980s.

“It’s so funny that I’m back to the one place I was so looking forward to leaving,” said Ms Campbell, who also lives with her parents, in her childhood bedroom, with her own little girl.

But The Vineyard is also both a refuge from urban life and an opportunity to reconnect with one’s original creativity.

“This island is still my interior architecture,” Ms. Campbell said.


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At Sundance, documentaries resurrect lost eras of music https://ghostsofabughraib.org/at-sundance-documentaries-resurrect-lost-eras-of-music/ Mon, 24 Jan 2022 22:36:04 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/at-sundance-documentaries-resurrect-lost-eras-of-music/ NEW YORK (AP) — Can a music scene still grow the way grunge did in Seattle in the 1990s or hip-hop in the Bronx in the 1970s? Or has the digital metamorphosis of music made such geographic explosions obsolete? That’s a question that looms over the Sundance Film Festival documentary “Meet Me in the Bathroom,” […]]]>

NEW YORK (AP) — Can a music scene still grow the way grunge did in Seattle in the 1990s or hip-hop in the Bronx in the 1970s? Or has the digital metamorphosis of music made such geographic explosions obsolete?

That’s a question that looms over the Sundance Film Festival documentary “Meet Me in the Bathroom,” a vivid and chaotic time capsule of early 2000s New York when bands like the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, TV on the Radio, the Strokes, Interpol and LCD Soundsystem make the city – and Brooklyn in particular – one of the last easily identifiable hotbeds of rock music.

The film, which debuted Sunday at Sundance, is directed by Dylan Southern and Will Lovelace, and adapted from Lizzy Goodman’s book, “Meet Me in the Bathroom: Rebirth and Rock and Roll in New York City 2001-2011.” Focusing primarily on the first handful of those years, the documentary is an ode to an already distant era when a wave of bands revitalized New York’s music scene, capturing the city’s gritty romanticism. Brief interludes of news footage allude to a larger digital narrative forming largely outside the stage bubble: Y2K scares, the rise of Napster, the introduction of the iPod.

“One of the things we kept asking is, is it even possible for a scene to emerge in a place with such intensity?” Southern, who with Lovelace directed the 2012 LCD Soundsystem documentary “Shut Up and Play the Hits,” said in a recent interview. “Now the way we consume music is different, the way we listen to or even make music is different. The Guardian newspaper, when they reviewed the book, they described it as a moment flash before everything changes.

“Everything is so democratized and widespread,” adds Lovelace. “People don’t seem to buzz around music anymore like they once did.”

At Sundance, however, there’s always buzz around music documentaries. At last year’s virtual festival, Questlove’s “Summer of Soul (or… The Revolution Will Not Be Televised),” which documented the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, was arguably the festival’s biggest hit. This year’s Sundance, which is also happening virtually and runs through Sunday, is packed with music documentaries. Among this year’s crop is the first film of a three-part Netflix documentary on Ye (formerly Kanye West), “jeen-yuhs”, and Sinéad O’Connor’s documentary “Nothing Compares”.

The films differ widely in subject matter and style, but they each resurrect a musical past that seems far removed from our present.

In the first part of “jeen-yuhs,” which debuts next month on Netflix, a not-yet-famous Ye struggles to sign a record deal, selling beats and yearning for the kind of ubiquity that inspires him. has followed, more or less non-stop, since his 2004 debut album, “The College Dropout.” His restlessness is all-consuming, as is his confidence. “Even me doing this documentary, it’s kind of narcissistic or whatever,” Ye says in a moment of self-reflection that now feels prophetic.

But there are also tender scenes in the film, directed by Coodie and Chike, that speak to what propelled Ye in the first place – like the touching and gentle support of his late mother, Donda. She’s the most supportive of moms, rapping her son’s lyrics and telling him, “You play songs like Michael Jordan shoots free throws.”

Such a maternal relationship never existed for O’Connor, who opens up about the abuse she suffered at the hands of her mother in Kathryn Ferguson’s “Nothing Compares.” For many, O’Connor has been largely reduced to a caricature – that feisty bald Irish singer who tore up an image of the pope on “Saturday Night Live”. But “Nothing Compares,” by exposing O’Connor’s life, which she talks about in off-camera interviews heard throughout the film, gives O’Connor’s music and career the depth it deserves in retracing the pain that drove her. She was only 20 and pregnant when her 1987 debut album was released.

And from the start, O’Connor was outspoken on a wide range of issues, from the Catholic Church she was schooled in to the Grammy Awards’ ghettoization of rap. Sometimes his protests were accompanied by self-glorification, but you can’t watch “Nothing Compares” (which unfortunately, since the Prince estate didn’t allow it, doesn’t include “Nothing Compares 2 U”) and not to think that O’Connor’s rage came from a genuine place. And the years that followed, which saw a lot come to light about long-hidden abuses by Catholic priests, cast his criticisms in a different light.

“I was always crazy about the media, I was made to look like a crazy person,” she says in the film. But the abuse of children by priests, she says, “It was madness.”

“Nothing Compares” suggests that O’Connor, in speaking the way she did, was ahead of her time. Still, the documentary remains largely in the past, effectively ending in the mid-’90s and not following O’Connor’s life since his brief mega-stardom. A standing ovation from Sundance could have been a crowning glory for O’Connor. The film festival‘s Q&A has been canceled after her 17-year-old son, Shane O’Connor, recently took his own life.

“Sirens” by Rita Baghdadi is set in the recent past and in a more tumultuous political context. This is without a doubt the most compelling portrayal of a female Lebanese thrash metal band you’ve ever seen. But it’s also a clear standout at Sundance and much more than a novelty act. In a documentary genre that can easily slip into the cliché, “Sirens” exists another world. Its characters, the members of Beirut-based Slave to Sirens, grapple with more extreme issues than most bands dressed in black and covered in tattoos. For them, battles for free speech and LGBTQ rights are intertwined with power deals.

It’s also a classic story of band dynamics, largely focusing on the friendship and disagreement of Lilas Mayassi and Shery Bechara, the band’s two guitarists. Their bickering sometimes resembles that of any group. But on other occasions, onstage and offstage resistance joins harmony. In one scene, Mayassi and Bechara meet and converse on the sidewalk, only to be engulfed in a marching protest, which they casually join.

Southern and Lovelace did “Meet Me in the Bathroom” (the title comes from a Strokes song) mostly during the pandemic. Although they always intended to focus largely on archival footage, circumstances led them to keep the film entirely in its time, without the modern glares of talking heads. Instead, “Meet Me in the Bathroom” captures the feeling of limitless potential – of singers seemingly born to perform like Karen O and Julian Casablancas taking their first steps on stage. The directors viewed each thread as a coming-of-age story.

“In a weird way COVID helped us because during the lockdown people had time off and they were happy to climb up in the attic or go to their storage unit and find those things that had been there for 20 years,” says Southern. “What we didn’t want to do was do a typical behind-the-scenes music rock documentary where you have talking head interviews with the bands 20 years later and it really takes you out of time. We wanted to place the audience back in that era as much as possible.

___

Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jakecoyleAP



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Woodstock principal Michael Lang has died at 77 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/woodstock-principal-michael-lang-has-died-at-77/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 09:20:00 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/woodstock-principal-michael-lang-has-died-at-77/ Michael Lang (Photo: Debby Wong / Shutterstock.com) MICHAEL LANG, the visionary organizer and producer of WOODSTOCK, the 1969 music festival that became a cultural touchstone for a generation, died of complications from lymphoma in NEW YORK CITY at the age of 77. While LANG enjoyed a long career in music as a producer of rock […]]]>

Michael Lang (Photo: Debby Wong / Shutterstock.com)

MICHAEL LANG, the visionary organizer and producer of WOODSTOCK, the 1969 music festival that became a cultural touchstone for a generation, died of complications from lymphoma in NEW YORK CITY at the age of 77.

While LANG enjoyed a long career in music as a producer of rock concerts and manager of artists such as BILLY JOEL and JOC COCKER, he will always be remembered as the idealist with curly hair, shirtless and motorcyclist with the smile of a cherub. who envisioned a weekend of peace, love and music that personified the cultural and political idealism of the baby boomers marching for civil rights and against war in VIETNAM.

LANG told me in 2019, “In 1969, the bands in WOODSTOCK were all part of the counterculture. They were very involved in our lives. It wasn’t just entertainment; it was more about social issues. . They were part of our generation. WOODSTOCK provided an environment for people to express themselves better, if you will. Give them that, and it seems to work. It was probably the most peaceful event of its kind in the story. And that was because of the expectations and what people wanted to create there. ”

Music was the method and LANG always said he always dreamed of creating a concert somewhere in the countryside, where friends could get together and enjoy the music like he did. What LANG, ARTIE KORNFELD and their partners – JOEL ROSEMAN and JOHN ROBERTS – originally planned as a concert for no more than 50,000 people quickly became a three-day event with over 450,000 people, which spawned to a successful documentary and three platinum records. set of albums.

As LANG himself told me in 2019 around the time of the 50th anniversary, “The thing with the first WOODSTOCK … it seemed like there were forces at work beyond our knowledge.”

WOODSTOCK marked the beginning of the modern era in the promotion of rock concerts and music, with innovations in lighting and sound from CHIP MONCK and BILL HANLEY, respectively, security and recording technologies and videos that were born at WOODSTOCK and continue to this day.

NEW YORK TIMES reporter BARNEY COLLIER noted that LANG’s “supernatural calm and unruffled demeanor” kept all 400 staff calm in the face of one potential calamity after another.

LANG didn’t have as much success with WOODSTOCK ’94 or WOODSTOCK ’99, despite both festivals making money. LANG also produced a show in BERLIN, the night after the fall of the Wall, with people from WEST and EAST BERLIN coming together for the first time in a generation. LANG was in BERLIN with singer JOE COCKER, continuing the ongoing negotiations with the authorities of EASTERN GERMANY for the right to produce a concert on this side of the wall.

LANG had high hopes for WOODSTOCK’s 50th anniversary in 2019, but failed to organize the anniversary festival. The anniversary was marked by books and documentaries from around the world as well as other musical celebrations. In SEPTEMBER 2019, he was honored with the MUHAMMAD ALI FOUNDATION LIFE ACHIEVEMENT AWARD.

Reflecting on the cultural influence of the first WOODSTOCK, especially at the start of SILICON VALLEY, LANG said to me, “Build it and they will come. MAX YASGUR’s was our own dream domain. This was not the original intention of WOODSTOCK. It was a corporate advertisement intended to make money for our partners. I was keen to do something that married art and commerce at a time when the counterculture said this music was theirs and paying for it was a scam in a fair and balanced way, which you received more than what you gave. I thought people would agree with that. Our original motto was that you could come whether you had the money or not. Of course, it didn’t turn out that way because everyone entered for free. ”

LANG is also the author of the NEW YORK TIMES bestseller “The Road to WOODSTOCK”, with HOLLY GEORGE-WARREN.

LANG is survived by his wife TAMARA and their five children, SHALA, LARIANN, MOLLY, HARRY and LASZLO. Shala,

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The cities of tomorrow will be old-fashioned monuments of the past https://ghostsofabughraib.org/the-cities-of-tomorrow-will-be-old-fashioned-monuments-of-the-past/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 07:02:53 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/the-cities-of-tomorrow-will-be-old-fashioned-monuments-of-the-past/ The cities of tomorrow will be designed around a central element: a modern remix of the classical architecture we know and love. Designing and shaping the urban environment is one of the most direct and immediate ways to effect social change. You can do a lot for people by controlling the spaces in which they […]]]>

The cities of tomorrow will be designed around a central element: a modern remix of the classical architecture we know and love.

Designing and shaping the urban environment is one of the most direct and immediate ways to effect social change. You can do a lot for people by controlling the spaces in which they live, work and play. Just see how famous New York city planner Robert Moses integrated racism into the fabric of “his” city.

In “A visual story of the future”, Darren Garrett examines a number of different ways cities have been used by illustrators and designers to indicate the future. Sometimes it was the background of the future, sometimes it was the future itself. Anyway, if imaginary cities are an easy shortcut for the world of tomorrow, I think it also follows that we can use the ways we talk about cities that are already under construction – the cities that are just emerging from the drawing boards to become reality. -as a way to better understand the world we already have. We are all biased towards certain types of buildings and architecture, certain types of cities, which affect our comfort with these futures.

Perhaps the most intuitive example of this I experienced was visiting the Great Wall of China a few years ago. I was in Beijing for a three day layover and decided to go sightseeing and take a bus to Badaling, about 80 kilometers from the capital. It’s a section usually teeming with tour groups, next to a large museum, several hotels, and a vast asphalt lot that all those sightseeing buses can park on. There is also a cable car. It’s a very completely restored section of the wall; it looks brand new in places. And that was everything I was conditioned to expect from a theme park in Europe or North America, not a world famous historic site.

But then, it’s because I have expectations about what “the story” looks like. Ruins, preserved in the state where someone decided they shouldn’t deteriorate further. There are exceptions – a lot of European castles still function as houses, for example – but I was alienated by this approach to historic preservation. I know, rationally, that feeling overwhelmed by the Great Wall of China is extremely rude, but this is how I am culturally prepared to understand authenticity in relation to buildings. Most of us do this when it comes to new buildings, new cities, new futures for the built environment. The ways we interpret things like “authenticity” and “beauty”, even in something like a wall, are entirely relative.

Anne Applebaum wrote about it for Slate in 2011 which has marked me ever since. She says she visited Dubai and was surprised at how “incurably vulgar” the city seems to her “jaded American eye”:

There is almost no evidence of local history or culture. International brands are plastered everywhere, from Applebee’s to Rolex, and everything is imported, from Nobu’s raw fish to Starbucks coffee. In Abu Dhabi, the emirate opposite, they even bought the names Louvre and Guggenheim and are building corresponding museums.

She then points to the stories that Europeans wrote about visiting the new large cities of North America in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Europeans were baffled to see the distinctively European iconography and design reproduced on the brash new American skyscrapers. Abu Dhabi getting a branch of the Louvre is no stranger to the paintings of the Old Dutch Masters being in the Frick’s collection. Reactions to the immense inequality between a rich, ethnically homogeneous elite and a poor and ethnically diverse working class are also surprisingly similar to those of Westerners speechless at the Burj Khalifa while lamenting the neighboring slums.

Americans not only adopted the European style when they built their country, but they also imported European mercantilism, capitalism and colonialism. It makes sense that building a world-class city today from scratch involves so much selection and mixing of “real” cities – and this will, at first glance, seem utterly inauthentic to outsiders whose cities are being imitated. . .

In China, this is happening in the most demanding way, with quasi-literal copies European cities and emblematic buildings of the New Chinatowns. These buildings may be ‘inauthentic’ or ‘fake’, but if they copy buildings that people across the world love so much that they have kept them for centuries… so what? These buildings must be doing something right. (And that doesn’t forget how many “authentic” European buildings were rebuilt after 1945, in the style of the Great Wall.)

Abu Dhabi getting a branch of the Louvre is no stranger to the paintings of the Old Dutch Masters being in the Frick’s collection. Reactions to the immense inequality between a rich, ethnically homogeneous elite and a poor and ethnically diverse working class are also surprisingly similar to those of Westerners speechless at the Burj Khalifa while lamenting the neighboring slums.

“Like Europeans before me, I resist the idea that Dubai heralds the civilization of the future,” writes Applebaum at the end of his article. “But I have to admit that, in a sense, it could. … There have always been people who dream of escaping from their culture, who aspire to forget their history, and who are content to live without a past. And now in Dubai they can.

With all of this in mind, the question, I think, is simple: which cities become “the future”? After all, the neon-lit cities of East Asia (especially Tokyo) have been allowed to be “the future” for decades now, as direct inspiration from the cyberpunk genre. Why Tokyo, and not the techno-Islamic collage that is contemporary Mecca, for example? Why is only one of them instantly recognizable as the future-already-here, and the other, well, “cultural vandalism“? (It will also be fascinating to see if the success of Black Panther will lead to the integration of Afro-futuristic cityscapes into science and other popular fictions.)

We’ll find some sort of answer over time, at least. There is a short film which I recently found, a promotional trailer for a new book on Soviet modernist architecture in Ukraine, which touches on something fundamental here. In it, one of the co-authors, Ievgeniia Gubkina, tells how different generations of Soviet Ukrainian architects kept trying to start from scratch; each new generation has tried to build its version of a future on its own blank canvas. The immediate past was dismissed, but the older story – heritage – deserved to be addressed because of its survival and the perspective that time offered:

The architects of today do not dialogue with those of yesterday and they, in turn, did not like the architects of the past. … An interesting model is produced. We are unwilling to speak with a generation of fathers and mothers, but we always look to the legacy of grandfathers and grandmothers. Today we are talking to the generation of the sixties, while in their time they spoke to the constructivists of the twenties and thirties.

You could say that this is also how the process of the rise and fall of cities works. The first major popular campaigns to preserve Victorian-era buildings in the West were led by the grandchildren, not the children, of the Victorians. The same is happening now with the brutalism of the mid-twentieth century, both in the West and in the former Soviet bloc.

Poor 1980s postmodernism will still have to wait its turn to be celebrated in the same way, but I know that when it does, my instinct will be the same surprise my parents feel when they hear someone on the TV news defending a “concrete monstrosity” from their youth. The PoMo of the 1980s is cheesy and garish! It can’t be worth saving! Yet it will be, because it, like Dubai, is already the future , just as Tokyo has been for over 30 years now. Whether we can see these futures as blatantly futuristic as the hypothesis claims, well, that remains to be seen.


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2021 box office ends with more fireworks for ‘Spider-Man’ https://ghostsofabughraib.org/2021-box-office-ends-with-more-fireworks-for-spider-man/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 19:13:07 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/2021-box-office-ends-with-more-fireworks-for-spider-man/ NEW YORK (AP) – Hollywood closed 2021 with more box office fireworks for “Spider-Man: No Way Home,” which topped all movies for the third week in a row and is already among the top movies. most profitable ever. But even with all the champagne for “No Way Home,” the film industry is heading into 2022 […]]]>

NEW YORK (AP) – Hollywood closed 2021 with more box office fireworks for “Spider-Man: No Way Home,” which topped all movies for the third week in a row and is already among the top movies. most profitable ever. But even with all the champagne for “No Way Home,” the film industry is heading into 2022 with plenty of reason to be both optimistic and worried after a year that saw overall ticket revenues double that of 2020. , but still away from the pre-pandemic pace.

Movie theaters started the year mostly closed, but ended it with a huge bang. Sony Pictures’ Marvel sequel “No Way Home” grossed around $ 52.7 million over the weekend to bring its three-week total to $ 609.9 million. It ranks 10th all-time in North America. Globally, it made $ 1.37 billion, a total that places it above “Black Panther” and makes it the 12th highest grossing film in the world.

‘No Way Home’, the third standalone film from Tom Holland as webslinger, gave a huge boost to the box office revival that began in earnest last spring when American theaters opened after a year. closure of COVID-19. The Marvel films dominated the eventful year, representing the four best films of 2021: “No Way Home”, “Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings”, “Venom: Let There Be Carnage” and “Black Widow” .

The North American box office in 2021 was worth $ 4.5 billion, according to data company ComScore. That’s about 60% lower than in 2019 – before the days of masked moviegoers, social distancing, and virus variants like the now-booming omicron.

It’s unclear whether the movies will ever reach these pre-pandemic totals, as exclusive cinema windows have since dwindled, studios have experimented with hybrid releases, and few other superhero films are packing theaters. In part because of the disruptions from COVID-19, the 2022 release schedule is exceptionally filled with potential blockbusters, including “The Batman,” “Black Panther: Wakanda Forever,” “Top Gun: Maverick,” “Jurassic World: Dominion “,” Thor: Love and Thunder “and” Avatar 2 “.

The second place of the weekend went to the animated sequel to Universal Picture “Sing 2”. were the slowest to rebound during the pandemic. “Sing 2” added an additional $ 54.9 million internationally. Its trajectory should make it the first animated version of the pandemic.

But after “No Way Home” and “Sing 2,” little caught the eye of moviegoers over the holiday weekend.

“The King’s Man,” the third installment in Matthew Vaughn’s “Kingsman” series, grossed $ 4.5 million in its second week after a lackluster debut. But it was still good enough for third place. The Disney release, produced by 20th Century Studios, grossed $ 47.8 million worldwide.

Steven Spielberg’s “West Side Story” sold tickets for $ 2.1 million in its fourth weekend. While holding up well (the film is down 26% from the week before), the once-envisioned vacation resumption for the acclaimed musical has not materialized. “West Side Story” grossed $ 29.6 million nationally.

After failing to debut last week, Warner Bros. ‘ “The Matrix Resurrections” fell 64% in its second weekend to $ 3.8 million. The film airs concurrently on HBO Max, a 2021 practice that the studio has pledged to end in 2022. The upcoming reboot of “The Matrix” has even been overtaken by week two of Kurt Warner’s NFL drama “American. Underdog, “which grossed $ 4.1 million for Lionsgate.

One of the only new releases of the week was Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s “Memoria” with Tilda Swinton. Its distributor, Neon, defined a new strategy for the arthouse release, showing the film in one room at a time, without any plans for future distribution or physical release. “Memoria” began its pipe dream across the country with $ 52,656 since it opened Dec. 16 at the IFC Center in New York City.

Estimated Friday-Sunday ticket sales at US and Canadian theaters, according to Comscore. Final national figures will be released on Monday.

1. “Spider-Man: No Way Home,” $ 52.7 million.

2. “Sing 2”, $ 19.6 million.

3. “The King’s Man”, $ 4.5 million.

4. “American Underdog”, $ 4.1 million.

5. “Matrix Revolutions”, $ 3.8 million.

6. “West Side Story”, $ 2.1 million.

7. “Ghostbusters: Afterlife”, $ 1.4 million.

8. “Licorice Pizza,” $ 1.2 million.

9. “A Journal for Jordan”, $ 1.2 million.

10. “Encanto”, $ 1.1 million.

___

Follow AP screenwriter Jake Coyle on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jakecoyleAP



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A definitive list of the best soundtracks of 2021 – the Aquarian https://ghostsofabughraib.org/a-definitive-list-of-the-best-soundtracks-of-2021-the-aquarian/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 20:00:00 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/a-definitive-list-of-the-best-soundtracks-of-2021-the-aquarian/ 2021 was not much better than 2020, but the best soundtracks of the year prove it was a little less terrible. Why even make a soundtrack? Most people listen to music through their favorite streaming service and do so by choosing a list of tracks they want to hear. A soundtrack seems outdated and even […]]]>

2021 was not much better than 2020, but the best soundtracks of the year prove it was a little less terrible.


Why even make a soundtrack? Most people listen to music through their favorite streaming service and do so by choosing a list of tracks they want to hear. A soundtrack seems outdated and even a bit old-fashioned. Except that in 2021, a slew of first-rate soundtracks accompanied all the films that had stalled in 2020.

A total cinephile’s dream, as one amazing movie after another has become available for streaming and in (some places) real theaters, the albums are as adorable as their visual counterparts. It’s not too late to drop a needle on one of those 2021 soundtracks and give up control. Consider NOT spending an extra second organizing your list instead of embarking on a sound adventure with one of these albums.

As many of these soundtracks prove, some great ideas transcend time and space.

tick, tick… BOOM!

Lin Manuel Miranda’s debut film is an adaptation of the life and work of musical writer Jonathan Larson. Larson fans will love the soundtrack of the To rent the creator’s approach, mainly, by telling the key points of the story through the song. What’s good about listening to tick, tick… BOOM! soundtrack is that each song advances the plot of the story. Many musical soundtracks remind us of the characters’ emotional truths or support obscure but important details. BOOM! has its fair share of these too, like “Green Green Dress” or “Sunday,” but other songs like “Johnny Can’t Decide” tell the tale of Larson’s struggle between pursuing his dream. ” be a successful music writer and stay with his girlfriend Susan. “Real Life” is Robin de Jesus’ moving performance about the AIDS epidemic ravaging the lives of New Yorkers – a constant underlying threat to Larson’s circle of friends. Besides being entertained by the narrative facets of these show tunes, the fantastic vocal contributions of Vanessa Hudgens, Tariq Turner and The Mountain Goats make the songs richer and more varied. Finally, it’s proper to call Andrew Garfield’s impressive performance on Larson on its own – no small feat.

Licorice Pizza

Another achievement by famous director Paul Thomas Anderson is Licorice Pizza. Like the worlds he created in Boogie evenings and Magnolia, Licorice PizzaThe atmospheres of lean heavily on the sounds of their time. Anderson, still the authority on total film immersion for his viewers, takes us deeper into his characters, their lives, the overall story – and everyone’s aura – with this musical masterpiece. . Licorice Pizza takes place in California before I was even born, but tunes by David Bowie, Nina Simone and Blood, Sweat & Tears anchored me in that unknown era. Simultaneously, Jonny Greenwood’s melodic composition of the song “Licorice Pizza” adds the right amount of heart to bind audiences to the film’s less specific attributes than time. For example, the universal themes of love and youth make this story timeless. Whether you’ve seen the movie or not, you can enjoy this bouncy soundtrack; while seeing the film only reinforces the emotional resonance of songs like “July Tree” by Nina Simone or “Tomorrow May Not Be Your Day” by Taj Mahal. In short, PTA made us another solid.

Cruel

The music for this predominantly live-action movie is very much out of a Disney soundtrack manual. This makes the case that soundtracks are out of fashion because they are as over the nose as you might imagine… but as a standalone piece, this is rocking listening! Cruel opens with a positively feminist hymn from a title track by Florence + The Machine. A good girl / bad girl contemplation unfolds as Estella kisses like Cruella. We hear the Stones and feel warmth for a suffering young woman who has been victimized, but also feel her anger as she walks down a track with vigor for “I want to be your dog.” The film is fully embellished with “Five to One” by The Doors and The Clash. It’s bold and courageous, which is worth listening to.

Gucci House

If your eyebrows are kissing your hair in the absence of Gaga or 30 Seconds from Mars on the House of Gucci soundtrack, you’re not alone. While surprising, don’t get bitter about this eclectic mix of musical masters. Press play and step into the glamorous world of Italian fashion in the late 1970s. The record features legends, such as tenor Luciano Pavarotti, as well as Dame Judy Sutherland. However, it is not only Italian opera boujee and is far from missing the pop musicality of a Lady Gaga. David Bowie, Donna Summer, Blondie, New Order, George Michael and Eurythmics are some of the famous artists. So even if you are the biggest Jared Leto fan on the planet, it will be hard to resist this mix. Alice’s “Una Notte Speciale” gives the impression of dancing under a sparkling disco ball thanks to its synth pop sound. As Catrina Caselli’s Italian cover of the Monkees’ song “I’m a Believer” will remind you that this song is worthy of the life beyond. Shrek. Do something ultra-fashionable instead of spending time building your own playlist. Treat yourself to start-to-finish listening Gucci House soundtrack and feel like you’re head to toe in high fashion.

Annette

If you don’t know the Sparks Brothers, this soundtrack will give you a taste of their intriguing art rock style. Edgar Wright released a documentary about the duo this year because the two are worthy of their own history. As for Annette, stars Marion Cotillard and Adam Driver play the lead roles and perform a number of songs. “Can we start? And “True Love Finds a Way” incorporate choral singing groups and make the songs full and resonant. Listeners will find that some scenes blend into these songs as well, also think of atmospheres like cars and TV news. Sometimes that soundtrack is stringy, orchestral, and dark. “I Have The Same Dream Every Night” is sung with Driver’s raw energy, which makes it both creepy and intriguing, for example. Annette is fascinating listening. If you want big, orchestral and dramatic sound, you won’t be disappointed.

Judas and the Black Messiah

It is far from an edifying film. In addition to the gruesome murder of Fred Hampton, the heinous institutionalized persecution of the Black Panthers is dramatized in this film. The good news is Judas and the Black Messiah is full of award-worthy performances and its musical accompaniment is just as spellbinding. Unlike the other movies on this list, Judas does not rely on period music to establish a tone. Instead, a roster of talent ranging from Jay-Z to A $ AP Rocky delivers hard-hitting verses. At the same time, melodies float in songs like “Fight For You” by HER and “America” ​​by Angela Hunter. Rakim’s “Black Messiah” is distinguished by his unparalleled MC prowess coupled with the telling of the Panther story. Do not miss this soundtrack, because apart from supporting the basis of the film, it is a standalone for its epic sounds.

Roadrunner

I admit being totally biased when it comes to director Morgan Neville Roadrunner playlist. Neville not only included songs from the Anthony Bourdain documentary, but combed through the chef’s writings, social media, and friends to find his favorite songs. The result is almost a hundred songs from across the musical map (which is hardly surprising for a guy who has traveled the world with an open heart, mind and stomach). The writer and chef-turned-TV star’s aural tastes included shaggy, punky, psychedelic (and sometimes), nasal tunes from artists like The Clash, The Stooges, Brian Jonestown Massacre, Modern Lovers, Joy Division and Arms. Since it’s not actually a soundtrack, that doesn’t justify understanding why it succeeds, but it does warrant real listening as it’s an eclectic collection of the most popular songs, artists, and acts. appreciated by Bourdain. Something about hearing them reminds us of a man who was generous enough to share with us. These songs and the specific playlist of this film are a kind of memorial of him that I love to visit.

West Side Story

Steven Spielberg took the famous 1961 film version of Romeo and Juliet (not the 1957 theatrical production), with music by Leonard Bernstein and Stephen Sondheim, and gave it a makeover. All the big ones are still there, they just appear in a new order, and there’s a fiery addition – “La Borinqueña”. The Puerto Rican anthem adds dynamism to Western coastexisting sounds. The new version of Spielberg was praised for its improvements to the character story, the casting and the adoption of a character called Valentina, who is played by Rita Moreno (original Anita from the 1961 film). The incredibly moving song “Somewhere”, originally performed by main characters Tony and Maria, is now sung by Moreno in Spielberg’s version. Discover the new West Side Story if you love the old and want to see what works musically and inclusively in the new. Bernstein and Sondheim weren’t so much ignored as they were redesigned in a formidable and modern way.

The summer of the soul ( Or, when the revolution will not be televised)

Fortunately, this life-changing musical event has finally been “televised”. It’s definitely coming too late, and it’s for anyone who can stream it (barely a large audience), but the fact that this footage came out of 1969 in New York City seems miraculous. Thanks to Ahmir Questlove Thompson, performances by groundbreaking artists like Nina Simon, Sly & The Family Stone, Stevie Wonder, The Staples, the 5th Dimension, The Temptations, BB King and Gladys Knight & The Pips (to name a few a few) were selected on the film’s soundtrack. Reconnect with the energy and love that filled the air at the 1969 Harlem Culture Festival at Marcus Garvey Park (formerly known as Mount Morris Park). A mix of the world’s most influential singers and musicians makes for completely captivating and nostalgic live music listening. Summer of the soulThe soundtrack proves that good music never ceases to move its listeners, no matter the time.

The velvet metro

What’s absolutely fascinating about director Todd Haynes is that he can tell a story about who and what is true with as much verve as his fictional films. You’d be hard-pressed to find a work by Haynes that isn’t captivating, like the 2021 music documentary, Velvet Underground. Along with Velvet’s 11 songs, the soundtrack includes influences and associated musical talents from the era. You’ll find Bo Didley’s rendition of “Road Runner” from his live performance in Myrtle Beach. Distant guitar riffs crash like waves and the influence on Reed seems like an obvious oversite despite years of listening. The Primitives performance of “The Ostrich” is incredibly fun and Velvet Underground-y. However, what makes it successful is that it’s basically a compilation of sounds from the guys who laid the groundwork for zillions of amazing acts that followed their lead. It really is that simple and as sturdy as that.


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Manhattan Book Group gets approval from Mariel Hemingway https://ghostsofabughraib.org/manhattan-book-group-gets-approval-from-mariel-hemingway/ Sat, 25 Dec 2021 04:40:58 +0000 https://ghostsofabughraib.org/manhattan-book-group-gets-approval-from-mariel-hemingway/ Best-selling books, Mariel Hemingway, recently supported Manhattan Book Group: “If you’re looking to get your book professionally published, look no further than Manhattan Book Group. There’s a reason Manhattan Book Group is ranked # 1 for independent book publishers in New York City: they’re the best of the best. I recommend them wholeheartedly. ” Mariel […]]]>

Best-selling books, Mariel Hemingway, recently supported Manhattan Book Group: “If you’re looking to get your book professionally published, look no further than Manhattan Book Group. There’s a reason Manhattan Book Group is ranked # 1 for independent book publishers in New York City: they’re the best of the best. I recommend them wholeheartedly. ”

Mariel Hemingway is the granddaughter of Ernest Hemingway, the Nobel Prize and Pulitzer Prize winning novelist. Mariel rose to fame with film and television appearances including Roseanne, Superman IV, Manhattan with Woody Allen and Personal Best. She has over 60 acting credits to her credit. She was also nominated for an Oscar. She even collaborated with Oprah to co-produce a documentary, Running crazy, about the Hemingway family.

We reached out to JJ Hebert, the founder of Manhattan Book Group, and asked him about Hemingway’s endorsement. “I have always been a big fan of Mariel’s work in film, television and literature. It is an honor to be officially associated with her and the legendary name of Hemingway.

Manhattan Book Group is known worldwide for its hybrid approach to book publishing, having revolutionized the publishing industry by guaranteeing bestsellers and media coverage and delivering 100% all the time. Founded and operated by USA Today, The Wall Street Journal, and # 1 best-selling Amazon author JJ Hebert, Manhattan Book Group is one of New York’s top independent book publishers, located on Broadway in New York City.

One of Manhattan Book Group’s unique marketing departments can connect promising new authors to Mariel Hemingway herself via an influencer package. Hemingway will support eligible books through a promotional video. Recommendation videos are uploaded to YouTube and promoted through Google ads. Manhattan Book Group also makes publishing basics such as professional publishing, custom book design, illustration, global distribution and marketing.

For more information on publishing a book with Manhattan Book Group, visit manhattanbookgroup.com.


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